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Thursday, August 28, 2014

hamburger storage


HAMBURGER STORAGE

Let’s take a short break from the daring adventures of post-apocalypse weapons technology devolution, the breathless exposure of one’s bias towards a Home Happy Place, the continuing sage of fat bitches losing weight with exercise, and talk about a happier subject near and dear to all our hearts.  Dead bovine storage food.  Canned meats fall into one or two categories, usually both simultaneously.  They are hideously expensive or taste like the flaked off flesh of a mummified leper.  The only cheap “meat” or meat-like product is Treet.  Not only is that NOT a Treat, it ain’t meat.  Okay, I will give the devil his due.  It tastes a heck of a lot better than the budget hot dogs ( one super nifty idea from “Prepping For Armageddon On A Budget, book 1” by Charlie Bennett, which is now featured above on the Amazon ad and hence a subtle friggin hint to buy the son of a bitch,  is to cut up hot dogs in chunks and put them in a big screened stock pot in the sun, stirring a few times a day, to get a dried meat product- some items like taters don’t dry by this method and need the oven but a lot of foods do dry this way and he stocks up his budget pantry all through the summer.  He dries in the oven all winter ) out there now for the not so budget price of $1.25.  I confess, in a moment of laziness, to trying hot dogs again-in beanie weenies- for the first time in years and I swear by all the Gods they are even worse than ever.

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I can’t make home-made corn beef hash anymore because a can of the meat is way north of four bucks.  Ouch!  To me, canned chicken has a very noticeable chemical aftertaste.  Most canned fish is palatable, barely, but I’ve never been a huge fan of fish in any form other than fried, it certainly ain’t as cheap as it used to be, and I’m sure that now the only non-depleted stock is right off the Fukishima disaster area so any can I buy will provide a faintly radioactive glow to read the label by.  Now, I’ll be the first to tell you that a new product is probably not the most economical method.  There are better solutions, like buying meat on sale, freezing it, cooking it up in a pressure cooker when desired, then slow drying it in the oven in the winter to heat the house for no extra cost.  But, as a simple solution, one that isn’t too costly, there is now plastic pouches of cooked hamburger meat at Wal-Mart for $2 for six ounces.  Yes, there is some water added to it ( just there is in in most raw meats now- or, in the case of raw hamburger, Pink Slime ).  But subtract an ounce for that and $6 a pound for cooked burger isn’t outrageous.  It is COOKED, yo.  And packed for storage.  I’ve tried it, and there is just enough meat to satisfy the protein craving of two adults when mixed with a starch or filler.  And it tastes normal.  I’m stocking the crap out of it, myself. 

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16 comments:

  1. 6 bucks a pound?? I'd buy MRE's at that price instead.More food,and variety.Maybe a pressure canner and make it yourself.Not sure where you shop,but ground beef here in AZ is 3 bucks a pound,on sale.

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    1. Ground beef is $3 a pound. Uncooked and not in a long term storage pouch. I'm sure compared to storage food companies it is a good deal. AND, you only need spend $2 at a time ( rather than $25 per #10 can ).

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  2. Nit-picking time, Jim. Walmart? Thought you were done going to Sam's place? Also, knowing you as I do, the hot dogs you profess to not liking are undoubtably the dollar for ten type which nobody should eat. The acceptable ones are something like six dollars for eight which I'm sure offends you seven ways to May (or whatever the saying is). I think the truth of the matter is to mix canned meats with something to offset/hide the flavor. For good or bad, the best way to enjoy meat is to kill it yourself. May I suggest a meat grinder to put next to your grain grinder. Good for making wild/tougher/cheaper meat more palatable. Keep up the good work.

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    1. Seven ways to Sunday. I still shop at Wally's, but keep buying less and less as time goes on. Kroger doesn't carry the hamburger.

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  3. James, it's time to expand your survivalist mindset and challenge yourself to do something new.

    You have the money and the time -- you really should invest in a pressure canner and some canning jars.

    I can chicken, turkey, venison, elk, beef, and pork. It taste really good. It's real food (not pink slime) and I maintain the quality control.

    I use the canned meat for soups, stroganoff, stew, and just eating straight from the jar.

    A pound of meat will make a pint. A pint jar is more than enough for two people.

    The equipment is easy to find and not too expensive considering you now have a food preservation and processing center in your home.

    If I get time in the next few days, I'll write a guest article on the supplies needed for canning meat.

    Idaho Homesteader

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    1. Money I have to spare. Spare time? No- not even enough time to read. And NO energy. Work is now so much harder physically. And I am getting older. Not saying I couldn't, just that I have little motivation.

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    2. Canning meat takes 90 minutes a batch and you must keep track of the pressure. So you grab a chair and a book and plop yourself down in front of the stove.

      Start reading and every couple of pages look up to make sure you still have the correct pressure. You get to read while you are making great long term storage food.

      Plus you could write a booklet on Canning Food for the Apocalypse. Use all your canning supplies as a tax write off.

      Idaho Homesteader

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    3. Hmmm. Damn you for making so much sense. I wonder if Herself could be talked into doing that in the winter to stay nice and toasty. No, she'd cry like the thing would explode. Might be worth a try asking. I have a powerless freezer outside to keep the meat, and 90 minutes of propane is like 2% of a $15 tank.

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    4. I'd recommend Jackie Clay's book as a resource guide to home canning.I think you can order it thru backwoods home magazine.She's off grid,on a homestead,and a genius.She also uses proper punctuation.

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    5. Proper punctuation is a trick! Run away!

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  4. Thank you for taking the risk for us all.
    -sumdude

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  5. whats the shelf life? You are beginning to sound like a yuppie prepper,buy it instead of learning it.I expected more from a hairy lord......

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    Replies
    1. I'm not sure why the storage life would be any less than a can- a very long time, and without rust to worry about. In my case, it is cheap enough I am replacing all my old meat cans. Some over ten years old-which are past time to trash because of corrosion. This is just the standard "buy extra groceries for storage" we all do. I also eat the hamburger on weekends due to no refrigeration ( that, and eggs ).

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    2. ICELAND is going to blow from 2 volcano's so stock and stock.
      http://www.jonfr.com/volcano/?p=4845

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    3. Wouldn't that be pretty humping funny if it was Iceland and not Yellowstone or Yosemite that did us in globally? I'll check the link-thanks.

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