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Wednesday, July 23, 2014

carbon knife update

CARBON KNIFE UPDATE

As you are all aware, being in a state of perpetual awe of my drivel, the last time we talked about carbon steel knives advertised through BUDK company I told you I was going to acquire $100 in knives to start the process of moving from a collection of stainless steel to carbon, seeing as how the Chinese have made a mockery of stainless steel tools and all you get is the worst of both worlds- hard to keep an edge like stainless and prone to rust like carbon. There is still a place for stainless, such as in a high moisture environment or when there are long storage times, or simply for post-apocalypse trade and you want the cheapest you can find. I don’t mind having both but I’d prefer to not just have one. Now, I did advocate buying at BUDK, but mainly because you could not necessarily because you should. I ended up ordering through Amazon but only because I was in a hurry and had no time to go to BUDK and set up an account ( my last purchase from them was seven years ago or so-I’m sure I’m only on the catalog list since I spent so much money at Sportsman’s Guide- and that info and debit card info is all obsolete and my password long forgotten ). Churning out a blog is full of rushing about as if one had a life and was very important and busy.

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I ended up spending $75 and I got a tomahawk, a Kukri and a Bowie, along with the nifty Smith brand key ring sharpener that has a carbide V for dull edges and a ceramic V for touch-ups and a rod for serrated edges. It was $23 for the Kukri, $20 each for the ax and bowie and around $8 for the sharpener with free shipping. Out of $75, I’m happy with $30 of my order. Not the greatest ratio. Granted, these were entry level carbon steel weapons. But I had expected a bit better none the less. The tomahawk was the brand Cold Steel, and the head is not well attached to the handle. I don’t know why I’d carry it around just to have it break the first use. It is nice and light weight, so as with a bowling ball of the same characteristics you can really get some velocity going with it. And the metal seemed well worked. But the attachment… The Bowie was made in Pakistan and the whole thing barely hangs on to the “acceptable” side of the scale. The fit seems all wrong, hand to grip. And the sheath is a befouled joke, likely to tear apart on the first snag ( the belt loop is weak and thin ). It will do in a pinch, barely. The Kukri was another story. It was rough, but very well made and balanced. The two itty bitty knives that come with are worthless, as they look like the retarded leper of an apprentice to the knife maker with digits falling off tried to craft something with no semblance to a cutting tool. Made in India, and the only one I’d recommend ( besides the sharpener ). Ironically, sold by BUDK through Amazon. My next payday mail order ( the last on was eyeglasses for my daughter ) is going to be a Corona grain mill ( I know I have two or three crap Chinese ones but I’m not sure if I have one or two Corona’s. Best to get another one or three just to make sure ), another Kukri and two more sharpeners.

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12 comments:

  1. Amazon is pretty much my go to for the most part, (And yes, I do make it a point to order through your links) but sometimes BudK has some good deals. Yesterday they had a special that if you ordered $29.00 worth of merchandise you got a free Kukri. It looked like a decent Kukri as well? Sometimes they have free shipping deals.

    Now my Schrade Old Timer Boot Knife that I got through them is listed as having a 7Cr17 high carbon stainless steel blade. I'm no metallurgy expert, but it sounds like a compromise between corrosion resistance, and edge retention? The dive knives are the best option if worried about corrosion. They are either nickel plated, or at least have a high nickel content, which is also quite hard I believe? So maybe take a closer look at the dives when looking for a foul weather knife.

    I have a hand axe, but never found it to be that useful. Years later, my brother got two Kukri style knives from cheaper than dirt. The Kukri kicks ass as a chopper, and is way better than the hand axe. I feel like I could head up to the hills with it, build a log cabin, and just go all "Jeremiah Johnson" on this cesspool that we call a civilisation :D

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    1. I'm quite impressed with the Kukri, especially amazing since it wasn't my idea :)

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  2. Question: Don't you get tired of telling people how good you are?

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  3. I totally understand the hurry-hurry, get what you can afford, the better than nothing because the collapse could happen this afternoon at 3:00, but after the initial surge, why don't you focus on quality not quantity?

    For the same price of your 'not so happy with the quality' tools that you just got, you could have bought a really nice Buck knife that could last you a lifetime.

    In fact, it has a lifetime warranty and they will sharpen and maintain it for free if you ship it to them. Granted it's not warrantied if YOU do something stupid, but they stand behind their product.

    Since you already have TWO better than nothing grain mills, I would hold off on the Corona mill. I HIGHLY recommend the Country Living Grain Mill.

    Yeah, it's a lot more money. But you really get what you pay for. Really, you're worth it. Save up and buy the Country Living, you won't regret it.

    You could even view it as an investment. When the world ends you could be the local miller who grinds grain for the neighbors in exchange for half. Because it really is that much easier and faster to use that the cheap mills.

    You could also use your upgrades for a whole new series of books -- The Good, Better, and Best Gear to survive the Apocalypse or call it -- The Good, the Bad and the Ugly Survival Gear for TSHTF.

    Idaho Homesteader

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    1. I can't fault what you are saying, yet the fault with that investment is that this area doesn't grow grain and probably can't. I'd be a mill dependent on imported grain. Which isn't unusual, but I wonder if this wouldn't then be an investment for my grandchilden or great-grandkids rather than myself. I like the book idea. I will consider.

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    2. Well when the collapse happens, load up your hand or bike cart and head for greener pastures -- places that can grow grain.

      You could have a grain mill, a good knife sharpening wheel, some trade goods, leather repairing equipment and your solar charger set up mounted on a little cart.

      You move into a little community already a valuable member who provides a needed service. When the local war lords starts getting too weird (remember that power corrupts), you move on. (Another fiction book idea for you to pursue.)

      On a side note, you really should run an experiment on growing millet. It can handle heat, drought, short season areas and it's easy to harvest by hand.

      Idaho Homesteader

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  4. I probably get the same catalogues that you do, Lord Bison, and I do my ordering through Atlanta Cutlery, who sells stuff made by Windlass (an Indian company who also makes bayonets/kukris for the Indian Army). Much higher quality than the Pakis for the most part, although I do have the Sawmill Cutlery SM-17 which is a newly made file knife (1/4" thick). It needed work to get it sharpened properly, and I removed that Flaming Monkey Balls quality belt loop and threaded some paracord through the holes instead. For $15 (they've since raised it to $16) it's a very decent knife that I don't care about getting dirty.

    PS: One traditionally uses a worn out file to make a knife from, a detail that escaped the Pakistanis, so there's a useful amount of file teeth along the sides of the blade.

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    1. I know there are better companies, specialty wise, than Amazon. But, my case, conveniance and quickness

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  5. Great haired one, Old Hickory butcher knives. Carbon steel USA made Cheap http://www.amazon.com/Ontario-Knife-7025-7-Inch-Butcher/dp/B000MF9PY0/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1406175191&sr=8-2&keywords=Old+Hickory+7-7+7%22+Carbon+Steel+Butcher

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  6. Check out the Mexico manufactured Estrella mills too. They and the Corona look very similar in manufacture and materails, except for the Estrellas painted finish.

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    1. And $45 after shipping compared to $65. Thanks.

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