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Monday, July 9, 2018

battle rifle book 1


BATTLE RIFLE BOOK 1
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note: free books.  Plague https://amzn.to/2L2wqGD and its sequel https://amzn.to/2uiJ90u 
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[ I’ll be posting these about once a week.  Projected but far from guaranteed is about seventeen chapters at the standard 1k words apiece.  Nothing is new here, but I felt the need to write this and hence you SHALL be subjected to it ]
INTRODUCTION
If you are a new loyal minion, it might come as quite a shock to you that I am not like all the other survivalist writers out there, fawning and nipple milk leaking over semi-automatic weapons.  I despise the concept of semi’s for the apocalypse.  I shan’t go over that here.  You’ve read it all multiple times.  If you haven’t, if you are new, I would suggest you read my “Apocalypse Gun Porn” which is available in the book BBBno2.  This new book is for those that absolutely positively must have a semi-auto rifle for the apocalypse, despite my rather logical and well reasoned arguments against them. 
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Not pistols.  This is your primary long arm book only.  If you must have a semi pistol and need any advice, I’d point you in the direction of those new guns from Turkey.  It seems to be the new High Quality Low Price company everyone is raving about.  I’m a revolver guy.  As they say, if you ignore a pistol, go with a revolver and if you abuse a pistol, go with a semi.  I don’t feel I need more capacity than a revolver because at the ranges a pistol is good for it is a shot or three and then you are dead or it is hand to hand.  A pistol only fills a small niche need, and that is not my focus here.  It is to guide you to the best rifle or carbine.  If you are poor and already have a long arm, tough, stick with whatever it is and be grateful you have it.
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Just buy more ammunition for it.  Ammunition is the weak link.  Anybody with half a brain can improvise a firearm with minimal supplies.  You really can’t improvise ammunition.  Not modern smokeless ammo.  All this here is NOT to get you to buy another gun.  If you have one already, concentrate on ammunition.  This book is for the beginner survivalist or for someone who can afford to change their arsenal.
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I’ve changed my arsenal a few times, as my understanding and learning evolved.  My first one was just a pistol.  After all, I was in crowded California.  Best to have a concealable option.  Next I added an SKS-only because it was the cheapest option in that state ( I left in the early 90’s and I’ll never go back.  It had issues then, now it is a open sewer ), but the then wife wasn’t too keen on my paycheck but her money being spent on ammunition, so I just sold it to help with the moving money.  I also went from an auto to a revolver ( but kept both until I felt I could let go of my 1911, a faithful companion for fifteen years ).  I went back to the SKS but also dipped my toe into the Lee-Enfield. 
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Alas, it was the no.1’s, and the sites sucked.  I eventually switched over to the no.4’s, getting rid of the others.  The revolver became a victim of the divorce, and then the 45 of the divorce after that, along with the SKS’s.  I was without any gun for a few months, then started over completely.  I guess you could say between moving and divorces, I’ve changed my arsenal many times.  Next I had all no4 Enfields, a new revolver, sold my 45’s and stuck with just 303 and 357.  It was years later before I bought the Forever Gun arsenal.  Before that, I dipped my toe into a No Paper Trail arsenal, but that fell to a move also.  Shotguns were tried but never stuck.
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Here is my point.  I’d switched arsenals so many times that it was a comfortable process to me.  I had no problems getting rid of guns that proved to be less than ideal for the apocalypse, and buying all new ones, along with all the ammo and accessories.  So, when I tell you I’ve stayed with Lee-Enfields ( no4’s ) and revolvers for twenty years  and Forever Gun Rimfires for ten, it isn’t because I didn’t want to start all over.  I’m used to that.  It is because I finally figured out the optimal choices for myself.  But my choices aren’t going to be your choices.  Obviously, because I don’t do semi-auto.
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Just don’t take this as a Arsenal Change book unless you can afford to.  As I said, poor and already invested in gun/arsenal  A, more ammo only.  If you can afford it, then this book might be illuminating.  You can consider gun/arsenal B.  This isn’t another excuse to bash the Ar15, more an excuse to pimp for the Lee-Enfield.  I’m not going to buy gold twelve years ago and then insist you must have some yourself, because of the price difference.  And just like gold, firearms markets have changed due to price.  The Enfield is no longer affordable, nor is the AK ( we’ll get into that, as it is borderline whether you think is it or isn’t ), whereas the AR is so much cheaper that it turned into a contender ( which at the time it definitely was not ).
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If you are reading this in the future, the market could have completely changed again.  When I wrote The Forever Gun, rimfire was completely unaffordable and NOT an option.  I focused on the 9mm, holding my nose over the semi issue ( to my mind, the 9mm revolver is WAY overpriced and unworthy of consideration ).  The rimfire is once again a contender.  Things change.  Just as LED’s completely did away with older school illumination, gun prices dictate arsenal changes.  Nothing stays the same in life, nor in survivalism.  The semi’s that were golden twenty five years ago are not now, and those dismissed should no longer be. 
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Next time, size does matter, and so does cost.
END ( today's related link https://amzn.to/2NoZXLZ
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*** Unless you are in extreme poverty, spend a buck a month here, by the above donation methods or mail me some cash/check/money order or buy a book. If you don't do Kindle books, send me the money and I'll e-mail it to you in a PDF file.  If you donated, you may request books no charge.   My e-mail is: jimd303@reagan.com  My address is: James M Dakin, 181 W Bullion Rd #12, Elko NV 89801-4184
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65 comments:

  1. Yes Jim. Firearms as products evolve in utility, quality, price, acceptance-availability. As a Minion also evolves in his abilities, finances, and needs-requirements his firearms inventory may change, not unusual and it happens often. As a gun store peddler and gun slut myself I agree with ammunition being the #1 key requirement to focus on, stock it the hell up. Secondary importance is Minions should stay with mainline (military-police) adopted weapon system types (not fan boy fads) and mainline calibers (again common military calibers, not new creations or fan boy bullets) There will be ample battle field pick-ups and guns found on dead bodies. No need to buy dozens now for yourself.

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    1. Buying dozens is fun, but it is time for the Big Boy Pants. Get rid of a fun gun if you can't do the ammo.

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  2. I am kinda a run what you got type of guy. I do have a no 4 Enfield, but that is because I stumbled upon a screaming good deal. I would have been just as happy with a nice Mossburg shotgun or a Marlin 30/30.

    While I wouldn't mind a pistol, I am waiting for another good deal to come along, 9mm being the minimum I would consider

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    1. I can see a 22 revolver for the apocalypse, but other than that, yep, a cc self defense gun should start at 9mm

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  3. Was at a friends a couple weeks ago and his young nephew came in sporting his brand new AR15 he bought just minutes before off the shelf at Gander Mt. The friend has plenty of guns but no AR's and doesn't see a need for them, and he's a hunter of every kind. The nephew handed it to me and I threw it up on my shoulder and sited it and that seemed OK I guess. Then I racked the slide, looked in the door, left it fly forward and pulled the trigger. Seemed a little scratchy, could use some CPO. I pushed the receiver pins out, pulled the BCG out, held my pocket flashlight at the muzzle and sighted down the barrel from the breach. No chrome. Limited shelf life. I told the nephew a few things and he excused his error by saying he just wanted one now and he'll upgrade in the future. I told him that if he's not buying matched sets of parts from the same respectable dealer he will make the whole thing worse.

    If you start off with a cheap AR15, and most other cheap things as well, and try to upgrade it later you are trying to put a V8 in a Volkswagen Beetle. Yeah you can do it but you're going the long expensive way about it. Better to buy the Camaro with the V8 already in it then upgrade that later on. The base model is already quality and anything you do with it regarding upgrades will be icing on the cake.

    If you want an AR15 that is comfortable to shoot all day long, accurate out to 300 yds, and built to last more than a few thousand rounds, you are going to spend at least $1,000.00, and that's a stripped version with no extras. Halfway decent extra's, in order to have a pretty good all purpose rifle, will cost another $1,000.

    If I was a completely broke dik dawg and suddenly became "woke" this morning, but had say $400/wk coming in I'd seriously considering my first step in securing my future by getting the hell of of any metropolis immediately, and into some sort of rural environment as far from cities as possible.

    Then a few buckets of wheat and a used .22 auto rifle and as many rds of ammo I could get til my coin ran out. It's very difficult for me to consider the mindset of someone that has NO survival thoughts or possessions at all because all of my life I have been in some phase of self sufficiency. Since I was a teen I've had knives, flashlights, guns, and extra food around. People that don't have that stuff already probably don't deserve to live when the bottom falls out as they will be a drain on others.

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    1. Do you consider the auto 22 a safe bet over a bolt, based on the crappy plastic innards? Is this a non issue? Or is it just to get you throwing lead at the mobs, and a short term gun like that cheap AR? I'd be interested in your thoughts. I might be too paranoid over the quality issue. If I buy any gun ever again it will probably be rimfire ( as long as the cheap ammo holds out ) and I don't mind spending for quality. I just want ruggedness.

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    2. It's hard for me to compare a bolt to an auto cause they are 2 different animals that do the same thing but differently. I likes my bolt but to me it's more of a "casual" gun. Take your time, shoot slow and easy and accurate. Any auto is meant to do the opposite to a certain degree. This is not meant as a slam against any decently performing gun.

      As far as plastic "important" parts in a gun goes, I would try to replace them as soon as possible with steel or possibly some sort of other metal. I'm not a fan of plastic overall but can accept it in some things, but not important things. My Rem 870 came with a plastic magazine follower so I replaced it with an aluminum one. Plastic breaks (at the most desperate time) but aluminum won't. As for a .22 auto rifle, Marlin 60 or Ruger 10/22, but I won't discount others, and as far as pricing goes, the Marlin is so inexpensive I don't see why everybody doesn't have one. My 60 is silver and black and I'm glad I have it. One of my better purchases over the years.

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    3. In this case, I'm basically concerned with a gun that will last for generations, not its accuracy or ability to dump lead. With a bolt, I'm looking at far less to break, long term. I was just wondering if I can get that in a semi. If I have to spend $300 on a 10/22, AND replace plastic parts, meh. I don't think I'll rush into buying anything, this is just research. I'm trying to find out if I gain any advantage even considering semi.

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    4. Good place to do that rimfire research is RIMFIRECENTRAL, has a lot of knowledgeable people and posts that might help you determine what you want. Also research PROJECT APPLESEED, they will have a lot to teach as well.

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    5. Excellent! Thanks for the info.

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    6. Well, I just don't know. I've worked as a Porsche mechanic in civilian life and a L-19 mechanic in the Army. Also, I done some semi-professional gun smithing, mostly 1911A1s and ARs, lots of Mauser k98Ks.

      Everything constructed, and most natural stuff, breaks. I've run lots of ammo through many ARs, and never had one break. I've seen broken ones, mostly problems with the bolt. Bad magazines or bad ammo cause all most all stoppages, but those can be avoided.

      The most serious stoppage I've had was in Africa when the bolt lifter on my Remington .416 RemMag broke off. Required serious welding (and three days) to repair.

      Does that mean bolt rifles are not reliable? Or that ARs are better? I don't think so.

      I believe that the M16 series had teething problems. And I've seen how fashionable it is to bad mouth the AR. Cooper called it a 'poodle shooter.' He also touted the 10mm pistol.

      I know the 5.56mm cartridge only puts about 1,000 pounds on energy on target, and blah, blah, blah. I know the performance characteristics of the various bullets available for that cartridge. My .416 put over 5,000 pounds on target behind a Barnes bullet, so I didn't shoot Cape Buffalo with an AR in 5.56mm FMJ.

      My experience over the (now) long life of the .223 Remington cartridge and the AR is that the platform is reliable and the cartridge effective on its intended targets.

      You are right that it is easy (and fun) to burn up thirty rounds. No weapon is fool proof, given a sufficiently determined fool.

      Just get off the trigger when the job is done. Personally, I'd rather shoot something dangerous too often rather than not often enough.

      Enjoy your stuff, James. Keep at it, whatever 'it' is.

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    7. As I've said before, I understand I'm prejudiced against the AR after my bad experiences with the A1. I have an actual mental block against accepting it has improved. It is like hating an ex-wife. No matter how much more you understand her side of the story, you still hate the vile whore. The AR has enough attributes to make it a viable choice. Just not a choice for me, more than likely.

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    8. Point made; point taken. No quarrel.

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    9. Not taken as a quarrel. I need to be constantly schooled to keep in top form. The day I can't learn or won't, I'm finished as a writer. If I had an AR, I wouldn't quiver in fear. I know it is Good Enough. Used OUTSIDE its mission role, it is a great rifle. It is the use as a submachinegun dirtying itself that makes it crap. Mid range sniping and you've got a contender.

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    10. when I was 16 my uncle < god rest his soul > gave me a Remington .22 zz automatic. it has run flawlessly , for nigh on 36 years . its a semi . My ruger is way less old . seems ok . but seems a little flimsy compared to the old Remington . just my personal experience .

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    11. I imagine the cheap boys rifles of yesteryear were made better than the most expensive 22 today. Sadness :(

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  4. Thing is , unless you spend big bucks and get a piston acuated AR , It is not worth owning !
    Worth noting, the 10/22 is still the most dependable and cost effective rimfire weapon sold. IMHO.
    I Had a #4 way back in the early eightees, sold it for a Remington model 700. Even back then ammo was too expensive for the Enfield.
    I'm salivating for a Ruger American bolt gun now

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    1. 10/22s have to be kept clean also, I had one slam fire on me shooting a feral cat.

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    2. I owned a few 10/22's back in the 90's. Never got to use them as they were another divorce casualty. Based on my comment above to GS, what do you think? Am I gaining anything ruggedness wise sticking with bolts, compared to the 10/22. I believe they are the best semi, but do I hurt myself longevity-wise compared to the bolts?

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    3. Concur, go with ruger 10-22. It will last you a long time. Clean and lube as always. Look at the break down model for compact storage-carry. Also a bull barrel with threading for suppressor later on or as an option for opportunities. :) :) :)

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    4. I've read quite a few good reviews of the Ruger bolt (RAR), but I'm pretty settled with what I have already. If I had to start over, the RAR would be one of the 1st considerations after a handgun. The order of acquisition would be 1) centerfire handgun, 2) centerfire rifle, 3) shotgun, 4) rimfire rifle, 5) rimfire pistol (possibly a small hideout pistol.

      That is just my thinking though.

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    5. Jeez, I'm so far behind the curve on guns. Never heard of 80%.

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    6. Isn't the break-down much more? I'm already spending extra for the brand.

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    7. Yeah, the breakdown model goes for around a hundred bucks more.
      I have a 10/22 that I bought back in the early 90's. Have barely ever cleaned the thing and probably had a ten housand rounds put through it, with zero issues.
      Now I've got a stainless model too, purchased about five years ago. Paid $259.
      Both have after market folding stocks.
      Have the same stock on the mini 14.

      With all Ruger , you'll want the factory mags !

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    8. I think for inflation the 10/22 is actually lower in price now. Which is good. I'd only have the factory 10 round flush mag for it-I think you're looking at zero risk with those.

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    9. There's a video on youtube of a couple living off the land nomad style in New Zealand. The footage of the sheila hunting had her with a stainless 10/22.

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    10. Oh for sure the factory ten rounders are almost never fail to feed great.
      Though the newer ruger 25 round ones seem to be almost just as good. The later Butler Creek hot lips ones are also good.
      WeveW got ten each size for both 10/22's
      Ten of the small ones give you a hundred rounds in a fairly small package too.
      Or , ten of the large 25's allows you to put out a shit ton of lead over a short time ( should you ever feel the need ha ha )
      Fully agree on the 10 k per 10/22...

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    11. I think I'm up to 13k rounds now. Still feel twitchy around the Buy Now button though when at Sportsman's Guide. If I'm not mistaken I just saw a 5k case for $200. Not sure about shipping though.

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    12. Dingo-do they allow such crowd slaying mighty assault carbines there? Seems dangerous. On stainless, I finally came around to downgrading stainless knives, so I also think I could survive without a firearm in SS. They sound so, I don't know-functional? But you need oil for lubrication anyway. Why wouldn't you have oil to keep the rest of the gun healthy?

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    13. They allow everything. No word of lie when I visited their Christchurch store I stepped over a functioning anti-aircraft gun for sale. Sten guns, PPSh-41 with drum magazine, AK-47 (full auto), M-16 & M-4, and suppressors aren't regulated and are considered good manners to use.

      Catch? you're not allowed to fire them (but can buy ammo for). One guy took his Sten out to international waters & videod the fun, only to have the police chuck a spack when they saw it.

      Catch 2 - prices = ouch & good luck getting extra magazines

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    14. Can't have silencers here, else how to triangulate on the shooter after it is open season on our communist overlords.

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  5. It helps to consider strategy and tactics before equipment (as you already know). Strategy seems to come down to three main ways to go. Look so strong no one wants to mess with you. Look so poor no one thinks you have anything they want. Or be hidden so there’s nothing to look at. All three have there shortcomings. Semiautomatic rifles only seem important for choice #1.

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    1. Good point, well put. Semi's aren't the bees knees for every strategy. Of course, Jim, neither are bolts! :)

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    2. Well then, I suggest you get a half a dozen of each type, bolts, levers, pumps, auto's, and you can't go wrong. Get all of them in .22 and keep everything simple.

      Here's your idea for the day:
      A "Universal Receiver", with a wide array of adapters.
      On this universal receiver you can connect any caliber barrel, and any type of actuator, bolt, lever, pump, or auto, and install ammo in a variety of ways, tube, mag well, clips, belts, drums, single shot, etc. And it could have a pistol grip and short barrels for pistol work.

      The new "RemRugMarWin" universal gun - the last gun you will ever own! The gun that tamed the world and dispelled all myths forever more!

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    3. Well I do have Marlin lever guns in 22 and 30/30...

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    4. Anon 8:34 here,

      My point was not to equip yourself for all possible strategies. You may shift strategies over time, but you’re picking one main strategy and rolling the dice. I don’t think $2k rifles make much sense if you plan to look poor or hide from the world, unless you plan to be really bad at the strategy.

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  6. Jim, should serve some coffee with this blog. Enough good info from Minions to enable one to become an APEX-Apex predator. Recommend that whatever one decides, they should consider the finance commitment should not exceed a 20% of available funds whether income, reserves, or held-owned assets. The reason for this thinking is it will not benefit to be gun/ammo/accessory rich and fatally poor in many other areas. As erotic as it is to think of collapse foreplay and post apocalypse intercourse, guns will probably not be all that. Get it out of the way in a kinda BTN manner. Add to it some more later but leapfrog focus and assets to the many more other areas that are as/more important to survival. (Need not expound, Jim covered it all already)

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    1. I thought guns were supposed to be 80% of your preps. 90% if you need a FLIR scope. :)

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    2. "Food is first. Always" Lord Bison (I have other pearls of wisdom but no handy)

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    3. Regarding all that FLIR stuff. I have a 0-6 variable on my AR and a bipod and both are quick detach, can take em off with the swing of a lever. If I have to carry it for any distance both are coming off. It also has pop-up magpul hard sights. With just the pop-ups it's a little over 7 lbs unloaded. With everything attached and a 30 rd mag installed it has to be over 10 lbs and that gets old quick. A FLIR would have to add a couple lbs to that. So anybody that has a FLIR it is mostly for show. After the blow up those things will be laying all over the place. heh

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    4. A found FLIR isn't as exciting as maxing out a c/c charging 23% interest and buying it new. Much less sexy :)

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    5. Agreed. CC bills are a downer, that's why I don't have any. Debit card and cash only.

      I have a set of IR goggles my wife gave me about 10 years ago as a gift. Pretty neat and they weren't expensive. But they have limited range, out to maybe 100-200 ft. So I got a high powered IR flashlight to throws the beam out much further, maybe 300 ft or so, depending. It's disorienting cause there is no depth perception. If a FLIR was mounted on a rifle I suppose it is possible to see the end of the gun barrel? Otherwise, how would you sight on a target? Kinda hard to explain, you have to see it with your own eyes.

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    6. I have no idea how good or bad FLIR works, I just love the concept of one piece of fragile electronics costing more than land that would save you every month on rent.

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    7. I have a SIG Echo 1 on one of my ARs, for coyotes at night. Works fine, but I'm past the point of wanting to sit up all night just to assassinate a bloody coyote.

      And you can get them as cheap as $1,500.

      Stand back for the shitstorm from Jim!

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    8. Hell, this article is on semi's. I'll have to give every other waste of money a bit of slack, too.

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  7. "If you are poor and already have a long arm, tough, stick with whatever it is and be grateful you have it. Just buy more ammunition for it"

    This is a keeper.

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  8. "I think for inflation the 10/22 is actually lower in price now. Which is good. I'd only have the factory 10 round flush mag for it-I think you're looking at zero risk with those."



    I have a 10/22. It’s an older model that belonged to my father (probably from the first generation, circa 1964). I later bought an after market 25 round clip, and then a 50 round. Both were unreliable, and would often stop feeding. Perhaps the high cap mags have improved over time, but the original 10 round factory clips were always reliable.

    Incidentally, I have a story to share. I saw a coyote a while back in the field next door, and reached for the 10/22. It had sat for a while without being fired. I was able to get a shot off, and the gun locked up. I’m not blaming it on the gun, but rather the lube having gummed up over time, so this is something to keep in mind. Yes, it would ultimately be my fault for letting it sit for so long, but that’s what’s nice about levers, pumps, etc. This is almost never an issue. By the way, I can fire my pump .22 nearly as fast, if not as fast, as my 10/22 by holding the trigger down and racking the pump. That is, if I ever needed to.

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    1. I really like the bolt guns for the butt simple reliability. The semi fans will tell you its the reloading time that's important rather than time between firing, but I look at it big picture: what is better long term, not short. I'm probably more prone to just order more ammo than save up for a 10/22. I can get a 1400 round tub, a set of rings and a drop compensator scope for half the price of another gun, and it will outfit my bolt rather well.

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    2. “I really like the bolt guns for the butt simple reliability.”


      They are Jim, and my all time favorite .22 was an antique Remington, single shot bolt. Even after my father gave me his 10/22 on the condition that I gave the Remington to my brother, I always reached for that old Remington first. That said, a bolt to me would be awkward to operate quickly, in a situation in which you needed to get off multiple shots quickly. This is why I’d probably prefer a lever action or a pump over a bolt.

      My brother lent out that old .22 to neighbor that later moved back east, and took it with them, and that was the last that we ever saw of it. This is the same brother that “gave away” his Enfield to a fellow drunk at the bar where attended. So when it comes to guns, this dude has no sense at all.

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    3. In theory, I use the Enfield for a more dangerous, crowded time and the rimfire after that ammo is gone. I'll probably never even use rimfire unless stealthy ambush. So, again in theory, a bolt will be just fine. Not that any of my theories worked out perfectly :)

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    4. Jeez, nobody should have problems working a bolt gun; you just have to learn to operate your bolt effectively. That takes knowledge and practice. For example, do you take the rifle off your shoulder to operate the bolt? If so, why? The bolt action, especially such as the Enfield Jim loves, can be operated extremely quickly.

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    5. Bolts are easy to use, but most folks want walls of lead.

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    6. Want a wall of lead? Try the Enfield:

      "The current world record for aimed bolt-action fire was set in 1914 by a musketry instructor in the British Army—Sergeant Instructor Snoxall—who placed 38 rounds into a 12-inch-wide (300 mm) target at 300 yards (270 m) in one minute." (Ripped from the web.)

      You can work the very smooth, cock-on-closing bolt while keeping the sights on the target. Cool.

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    7. I just hate using it in that way. The Brits did great with volley fire. Not being in the military, I want a rifle that won't jam in a critical moment. I didn't get it because of the smooth fast action but the ruggedness. I know what you are saying, I just hate selling it on a "near-semi" basis.

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  9. I bought most my long guns at estate and garage sales. A Russian sks, a long and a short mosin, break open 12 gauge, and a tube fed 22. The only new weapon I purchased was a Taurus g2 9 mm for 200 bucks. Poor boy arsenal wrapped up for 800 bucks. Now just stacking ammo. Would like a Ak but never ran across a good priced one. No ar-15, just don't like them. Prefer russian longguns.

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    1. I think you are better off with an SKS than a AK. More bombproof ( better build than already rugged AK ), no mags to buy.

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    2. I like 'em and bought a case of Chink SKSs long ago, but the triggers are most difficult.

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    3. Isn't that a pretty easy fix? Might cost as much as the original rifle, of course...

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  10. Jim, I owned a marlin model 60 in the late 1970's and it was very reliable. Hardly ever cleaned it and fired thousands of rounds of cheap lead ammo in it. I bought another one for my daughter about 10 years ago. They now have a shorter barrel and only hold 14 bullets. My old one held 18. This newer one has been good so far.

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    1. I'm not wedded to the concept of the 10/22. I'd be happy with a Marlin. Sounds like a winner.

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  11. I would skip the 10/22 takedown. Bought two of those for my my two oldest kids and they will not shoot consistent groups with iron sights or scopes. If you want a new gun Lord Bison consider the Ruger American Ranch bolt gun in 7.62x39. Bought one for my oldest son for deer hunting last year. Put a $125 nikon scope on it and it drives tacks all day long. I like this gun so much if I had to do it over again I would buy a bunch of these instead of ARs and then just stock the hell out of x39 ammunition. Then maybe pick up a few more SKS or an AK or two.

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    1. I, too, bought a 10/22 takedown, put Techsights and a folding stock on it. Compact as heck.

      As is my way, I must understand how to break and fix everything, requiring a full-take-apart and misassembly-reassembly sequence. Then shooting a few times to see if it still works. I found that the tension on the barrel twist-lock as well as holding or supporting the barrel affects the zero. You can get it just right if you try. A really cool way to fix the Takedown is with a couple of tax stamps and a 7.5" barrel threaded for a suppressor. The action is louder than the report, and with subsonic rounds, the hit on the plate is the loudest thing.

      Delete
    2. She says you don't have enough ammo, 'specially that 1200M horse-killin' kind.
      https://www.sgammo.com/product/303-british-ammo/500-round-can-303-british-surplus-ammo-174-grain-bi-metal-fmj-1980s-vintage
      $229.50 + shipping

      Delete

I must moderate-trust me. Criticize ideas, NOT the people behind them. Be civil. You will be warned twice and the third time just deleted. No N-Bombs. If you disagree with me, you must praise my hair first.