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Wednesday, December 30, 2015

my biggest prepping mistake 3 of 4


MY BIGGEST PREPPING MISTAKE 3
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Note: L.J.S., sorry I can't respond to your e-mail, the reply or forward just hangs and won't respond.  Thanks for the links.  I hadn't heard of the authors and enjoyed them.
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Did I make a mistake about where I live?  While I would have loved to settle down in the South, affordable land and jobs rarely went hand in hand and at the time unemployment might have meant jail time ( don’t get me started on child support to spouses that make twice your salary and the divorce says her income should be calculated but it never is by the female dominated enforcement folks, and don’t tell me “it is for the children” when I’m paying “support” after both children are out of the house, working and adults ).  I love the culture, and if it really mattered to me I still have the township mobile home lot in eastern Texas, but more or less arriving where I am seems to have worked out to my advantage.  Back there I have two million city dwellers an hours drive away and a vast majority of them are unemployed hostile racist ghetto mobs.  Do I regret not making payments on land in another spot in the South?  Well, yes and no.  Yes, because there is fertile soil and rain there, but no because living there is going to be challenging.  Not only the hostiles in your midst, but tens of millions of douche bag Yankees ( with apologies to any minion who was unfortunate enough to live there-I feel the same way about Californians and I was born and raised there ) waiting with baited breath to descend upon the South like locusts as soon as their winter heat is seriously interrupted ( just like Whites believe they have a right to move to Hawaii, Yankees seem to regard the South as “theirs”, spoils of war ).

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Don’t get me wrong.  Almost every location has both very good points and very bad ( some are more tilted one way or another ) and no one spot is perfect ( I won’t start, Idaho Homesteader [smiley face] ).  The South has a lot going for it, such as a culture that isn’t 100% in the 21st century ( that is a good thing ).  But I feel, personally-and your mileage may vary, that the population issue makes it too dangerous.  The Second Civil War ( which may or may not come prior to other areas seeking independence-in this instance I’m speaking of the rebirth of the Confederacy ) will most certainly see the South victorious this time around as long as they wait long enough for the feds to lose enough energy supply, but the road to that victory will most likely see racial wars within the area, Southern cities nuked by the North, mass starvation as the southern population shrinks back down to what the land will support organically and decentralized, guerrilla warfare between cultural Southerners and Southerners By Immigration, new diseases both old but reborn and newly arrived from the tropics, and a host of other issues.  Here in the desert West, things will be just as difficult but not as multifaceted.  We will depopulate much faster due to ALL improvements since the indigenous Indians carbon fuel based ( not least too much dependence of too many folks on shrinking deep wells and disappearing snow packs ).  The West the Whites know is completely modern Industrial Age based and completely unsustainable.  If you recognize and plan for that, survival will still be precarious but not impossible, with the huge benefit of a lack of crowds.  I’m not overly fond of my location, not because it is the high desert in the middle of nowhere but because it isn’t MORE remote and denuded of population.  I’m on the right path, location wise.  I ended up here accidentally but I don’t believe it was a mistake picking this for a prepper location.

Next article we finish up

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19 comments:

  1. If money wasn't an issue, what spot on the map would you specifically pick to spend the rest of your life in?

    I'm looking for ideas.

    I thought we'd picked a good locale 10 years ago but in the past 2 years some urbanites have intruded and I believe it's time to start looking.

    We're currently in a winter cold upper mid west location (south central Indiana), came here from 40 years in SW Florida (Cape Coral - Fort Myers), and we're getting old(er) so a warmer location has some appeal.

    But isolation is mandatory.

    I have less than 10,000 rds of ammo and would rather use it for food than defense.

    Frankly, after being out here in the sticks for a decade if I went back to suburbia I'd either go insane, kill somebody, or kill myself. My fuse is THAT short regarding assholes, which seems to be just about everybody any more.

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    1. Without money as an issue, I think I would still pick NE Nevada, but the most remote spot. Rainfall is much better than the western part of the state and some counties are losing population and are just in the hundreds or low thousands. But, I'm looking at nomadism/herding, not farming. If you insist on farming this state is not for you.

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    2. I researched this before ghostsniper, and this is what I've come up with. The central U.S. states such as the Dakota's, Western Kansas and Nebraska,
      and perhaps also eastern Montana and Wyoming. They are pretty much flat in most areas, but these are some of the least inhabited areas of the continental U.S., and also place one at a good distance from the coasts. I've also heard that rural Minnesota and Wisconsin are pretty conservative areas, and nice places to live and raise a family. Unfortunately, unless the area is inhospitable, such as the Sahara desert, anywhere that's warm is also going to be overpopulated. Cold weather is miserable, but it also keeps at bay all of the miserable people. Try to plan for at least a partially earth sheltered abode, as you do not want to be spending your entire warm season putting away firewood for the cold months when you are in your 60's or older.

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    3. And doesn't that general area have a huge build-up of dams? Might be a plus as long as you aren't directly downstream.

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    4. Not sure about the dams James? I just know that they're the least inhabited areas, with the most buffer from the coasts. When I looked at a map of Kansas and Nebraska, I noticed that the western half of those states are virtually uninhabited. And of course the Dakota's are no man's land. Wisconsin and Minnesota are more populated I believe, and even though I do believe that they are considered blue states, I heard that the rural areas are still pretty much unscathed by time, and are decent places to live.

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  2. The south initially was my first choice as well James, the northern Arkansas Ozarks to be specific. Land was reasonably priced, and I had assumed, perhaps incorrectly from what you've posted, that you would be able to find some sort of job? Lots of trees, water, culture, so it has a lot going for it. But like you say, the population density per square mile is really high. When you come across a land ad that mentions to the effect:

    “This land is about as remote as you could get, yet power is 400' away near the property corner,”

    you realise that there is a big difference in population density from that area, to the western states, where the nearest power line to a remote parcel could well be 50 or more miles.

    But alas, time and money were running out, and Elko county it was, by your influence. The deal breaker for remote junk land is needing an income. If you are smart with your money, and are able to retire at a young age, the ability to relocate to a remote parcel is a real option. Never marrying, or having children, will make this goal much easier and likely to happen. I would have chose somewhere way the hell out, many miles from pavement, if I could have.

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    1. The Ozarks might have jobs, but none I'm qualified in.

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  3. I know what you mean about douche bag Yankees. I was born and raised in a suburb of Detroit. Went in the Army and have been stationed ONLY in the South, if you include Missouri as the South. Made a home in South Carolina for 12 years. Had to move back to Michigan for work, but then went BACK into the Army in 2007. Medical discharge in 2009. Did I move back to Michigan? Hell No! I settled in Nashville. I hate many of the Northern attitudes. No offense to any fine folks who live there still, but I'm sure many know what I'm talking about. I have a house in Spring Hill, and guess what? Because of the GM plant here there are a bunch of Michiganders here. Gonna ruin a good thing bringing their Union mindset. Luckily my BOL isn't there. If I'm ticking off Northerners, well so be it. If you can't see what is around you and how it really affects you then sorry. There are good people in the North in the cities and mostly in the rural areas, but the cities reflect the politics of the whole state. Look at California. Rural folks with the same values as Southerners, but the big cities dominate who gets elected and the laws passed.

    So am I a douche bag Yankee? Since I identify with Southern ways and culture, I feel I'm a Southerner. If you get me to talking about the Civil War, you would think I was born in the South. Although I hate slavery and racism. Which reminds me. Living in the North in the 60's and 70's, you would hear folks say racist things about blacks moving in. My school of 2200 or so had FIVE Black people. I moved to the South and expected it to be worse. Was I wrong? It was better. Whites and Blacks went to the same schools, lived in the same neighborhoods and and of course worked together. Did I hear some redneck say the N word? Yes I did, but the whole racists thing seemed limited to those few redneck idiots. When I moved back to the North I noticed a larger difference, and worse. I had one Black guy in a nice new Cadillac, professional looking and I assumed educated, try and cut me off, but I wouldn't let him in, roll down the window and start yelling at me on why he HATED white people. (I didn't know he was black until he rolled the slightly tinted windows down.) I could care less about skin color. If you are driving aggressively towards me, I don't give in. Period. Anyhow, one indecent doesn't make a trend. This is one of many things I witnessed or experienced. I've seen whites openly say the N word to someones face and blacks saying hateful things back all in the North.

    Somehow though all of the bad names blacks have come up with for whites, don't bother me one bit, even when said with much hate. I get mad more at MFer than any of those supposed racist against whites names. Might just be me though.

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    1. Prior to the Civil War, northerners were just as hateful, if not more so, than Southerners towards Blacks. And northern businessmen ran the slave trade, to boot. You don't need to be a resident of the location to recognize what a raw deal they got.

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  4. As a southerner I agree we will have a flood of Yankees if any event happens. We have 50% of our power is hydro, temps are livable 10 months without heat. Farms can have 2 or 3 planting in a season. The land is fertile because it hasn't been farmed since the 40s.The only reason the confederate states haven't left the union is Social Security and other welfare payouts are beyond ability of the states to continue .Succession isn't possible when By design 50% of your population is federally employed or benefit dependent.

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    1. Not only fed employed and benefit dependent, but also a lot of Northern by birth and immigrants and/or carpetbaggers. Just like the Chinese flooding Siberia to subvert Russian control.

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    2. One thing I had thought about,but got too long winded above, was the advantage of a harsh environment, either desert or Northern winters. When living in Michigan I visited my Bro-In law in upper lower peninsula and how much harsher it was over SE Michigan. If you had plenty of food and firewood/propane people would freeze and starve by spring. Out in the desert in an underground shelter you could outlast with food and water, not much firewood/propane needed. Folks would die of thirst before starving. Try not drinking for three or more days in the desert. These people would drink unclean water and get the runs and other ailments. Anyone without clean water would be dead in a week.

      So looking at my logic above the desert would win. It's environment is consistent all year for the most part and dehydration kills faster than starvation. Freezing is quicker yet, but the conditions have to be right for that to work. i.e. Wintertime and no heating fuel. The other plus for the desert is lower population density. Even in the North anything East of the Mississippi is fairly dense.

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    3. Here in the high desert, we have killer cold, killer thirst and if you venture up a mountain, killer elevation ( ok, I might be making up the last one-unless there are big cats up there or you get lost ).

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    4. No,your first instinct is right, killer elevation is real. Lack of oxygen air pressure causes a near drunk like situation for many first time mountain climbers. Lack of judgement makes for falls and other perils to be even worse. It is recommended to take DAYS to adjust to high elevations like Denver and most of Peru.

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  5. Re: "waiting with baited breath"

    What? You have a mouth full of worms?

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    1. Mouth full of something. Did I spell the word wrong or have you never heard the expression?

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    2. Naw, sushi followed by not brushing your teeth will do ya'

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  6. it's "bated" Jim... :-)

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    1. Okay. As usual, spelling mistakes can be embarrassing. But I do try to remember for next time. Ten years go by, you look at my writing and say to yourself, my, what a studly brain he has.

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