daily ad

Friday, December 25, 2015

business as usual good for business 2 of 2


BUSINESS AS USUAL GOOD FOR BUSINESS part 2
*
Yeh, yeh, merry friggin Christmas!  A humping happy new friggin year.  Bah!  Humbug!
*
If you look all around you on a scale smaller than empire, you can easily see examples of how True Believers can extend and protect the life of a failing organization.  How cheerleading by the players themselves ( one imagines football players, being large lumbering Neanderthals incapable of thought [ “we went out there and gave 110%!” ] need a separate body of cheerleaders as they are incapable of self direction.  The cheerleads are there to instruct the players [ “GO, team!” leads to the player thinking to themselves, “what was I doing?  Oh, okay, I’ll GO!” ] ) does indeed extend the shelf life of the organization.  Look at teachers.  I’ve had plenty and at least half or more were still  energetic enough to retain their initial enthusiasm to instruct the youth of the day.  I’ve had teachers so intent on mission they were eventually fired for failing to stay on the different official mission by instructing from textbooks only ( the best teachers, those that inspired me for life, connected the dots that the texts barely covered-and one can only imagine there are far fewer of those today ).  I think teachers as a whole, not the aged mentally and spiritually or the administrators but the actual teachers, are a dedicated and inspiring bunch.  Yet look at the system they are forced to work in.  Money goes to everything BUT student instruction ( football players and stadiums and attendance and fundraising ) while testing is done not to ascertain learning but to give the FedGov statistics to use to pretend our country is not 109th in math or 97th in science globally ( some Bush Bitch walking barefoot through Muslim terrorist country to go to a school with a thatched roof does better, or would do better if not for gaming the tests we do, on her scores than most of our students in affluent neighborhoods getting thousands of dollars per student in their schools do ).

*

That our schools are not mere warehouses for juvenile delinquents more than what they already are is testament to the hard work of the teachers there.  The work of training the students isn’t hard, they are natural sponges up to a certain point, but the hard work is done fighting their own organization to get any teaching done in the first place.  Or, look at the military.  Do you think the officers running the place are doing anything other than hindering anything getting done?  In peacetime the lower ranks, primarily junior NCO’s, are essentially getting the necessary work done DESPITE orders to the contrary, and usually at the expense of a career as the price they pay is being pressured out for unconformity.  In wartime, their lives are on the line as those in charge do everything wrong keeping them alive. 

*

The teachers that teach despite hindrances and the leaders that lead despite contrary orders are the ones getting results, but they don’t advance the survivability of the organization.  Those teachers and sergeants that give in and drink the Kool-Aid, and then still have some drive and energy from their idealistic days, drive the organization.  Once the insane work load  batters them down they take their place alongside the short-timers nearing retirement as being carried by newer blood, but still have enough evangelical fever left to push the new blood to the desired direction.  Newcomers who fight the system can leave or adapt to groupthink.  Those older members unit to drive out the non-adaptors, which is their primary job as it requires less energy and is suited to their skills they’ve learned surviving in place over the years.  The young converts have the energy to supervise the new arrivals whose job it is to do all the work before either burnout or conversion.  Nothing is actually done by the converts except keeping the organization in place, but just enough real work is done by the new arrivals to justify the entire system to outsiders.  Job security ensures organizational survival.

END

Please support Bison by buying through the Amazon ad graphics at the top of the page.  IF YOU DON’T SEE THE AD, DISABLE AD BLOCK ( go to the Ad Blocker while on my page and scroll down the menu to “disable this site” ). You can purchase anything, not just the linked item. Enter Amazon through my item link and then go to whatever other item you desire. As long as you don’t leave Amazon until after the order is placed, I get credit for your purchase.  For those that can’t get the ads because they are blocked by your software, just PayPal me occasionally or buy me something from my Amazon Wish List once a year. Or, buy the monthly magazine.  Pay your author-no one works for free.  I’m nice enough to publish for mere Book Money, so do your part.

*  My monthly newsletter: search at Amazon under Kindle “Malthusian Survivalist Newsletter”.  * 
*Contact Information*  Links To Others*  Land In Elko*  Lord Bison* my bio & biblio*   my web site is www.bisonprepper.com
*My books: http://bisonprepper.blogspot.com/2015/04/my-book-links.html
* By the by, all my writing is copyrighted. For the obtuse out there

16 comments:

  1. Over at Grid-Down Luxury-Survival site, it is suggested that using $30K worth of solar gear to heat a 40 gallon tank of water is a good thing. What?! Why not buy another 20 acres of neighbor-buffer?

    The solution is: A freakin' big tank of propane to heat hot water until it's gone, OR a direct-solar water heater on the roof (coiled hoses, little pump with solar panel). Making heat with PV is always the stupid way to to get bulk-heating. The only way it can be worse is to run an inverter from a giant battery bank to heat water at night, which is exactly what is proposed.

    No EE degree required to see the oozing slime of fail. Copied below for truth.

    pdxr13

    Letter Re: Water Works
    Team,

    Yet another solution to hot water is to use a solar inverter of an appropriate size to provide 220v power to a regular old hot water heater. I can recommend the Outback Radian 8000W inverter and the Rheem Marathon water heater due to the water heater’s high efficiency and extra insulation. It uses between 3000w and 4500w of power depending on the model, and if you put it on a timer it only runs at night when everyone is asleep and not using the inverter otherwise. I have seen that inverter run our well pump, the hot water heater, and both of our furnaces all together, and it only hit about 75% of its capacity doing so. That combo keeps all five of my family members taking hot showers daily, and it doesn’t consume any precious fuel! – Gilpin Guy

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I read that article and had a similar reaction. What a Yuppie Scum. Even if your cost didn't bother you, what about battery failure? ( the day before this one an idiot was saying how "only" three gallons of propane a day was a screaming bargain ) Yes, you avoid propane, gone in a year, and have batteries that last five years ( if that, assuming they are new and not already used up by the time of the collapse because he lost his job due to economic implosion and couldn't afford to replace them ). Your solution, given a few replacement motors, lasts decades. Or, just have some mason jars under a sheet of glass like I did. Sure, you can't take a bath every single day. It is still more than once a week like the norm used to be. Or, once a year back when they didn't even try. If you can't see a need to bump down your "needs", you are NOT going to survive. Don't raid a Yuppie Scum's retreat-they will be stocking only luxury items, not longevity items.

      Delete
    2. If a site has lots of wind power, hot water can be a way to get some value from a diversion load, once batteries are fully charged. I would tend to pulling my rotor down (tilting mast!), once my batteries were charged to avoid wear on expensive wind machine rather than run diversion-load (which is mostly to give the power somewhere to go other than wrecking battery bank). Heating shower water with anything other than passive solar (moved by thermosyphon or little pump), or low-tech fire-fuel seems like a poor long-term plan.

      Do the 3 gallons of propane a day people run a post-apocalypse sauna, or an uninsulated 4000 square foot above-ground bugout palace? 3 gallons a month propane strategy with extra wool hats & blankets is a sign of thrift, and likely survival.

      pdxr13

      Delete
    3. Poor long term plan is what these people do. Semi-auto, living in the big city with bug-out vehicle, freeze dried foods ( usually exclusively ), one-is-none since they can only afford one of the best, etc.

      Delete
    4. Don't forget a $23000 belt-fed semi-auto former-MG to provide a "base of fire" for the SurvPalace.

      What would the Bison Prepper do with a minor lottery winning like $23K?
      More buffer acres with grateful minions? Hidden 5000 gallon cistern? Heavy equipment contouring of current bunker area? Much MOAR wheat and .303kit? Li-Ion super bicycle? Short pallet of silver 100oz bars?

      Delete
    5. I was looking at freeze dried single-serving packs at the Sporty Store in pdx and looked at calories. Only 500 calories per pac, and they call that 2 servings! For the money, I can get 14 little cans of tuna on-sale or 2 big cans of salmon. I could share a 14.5oz can of salmon 2 ways and not be too miserable if there were crackers, but would prefer to have all 1200 calories of fish after a day of carrying crazy-heavy 66# pack. Then warm beverage.

      pdxr13

      Delete
    6. 1:05-what the heck would I do with 20k? That silver looks good, but only half. The other half, build a turn-key underground house for the girlfriend, all the luxuries we just talked about recently so she would move out there. Then think about quitting work and going on foodstamps ( why you want your savings in silver instead of in the bank, besides other obvious reasons ), writing full time and getting my exercise digging out another home for in-laws, caches, etc.

      Delete
    7. pdx-I'm the last one to say don't buy freeze dried. Initial bug-out or short term disasters or running away to secondary location. Heck, I still have two MRE's that should be about worthless now after going through years of temperature extremes. I'm just preaching moderation. Your point should be well taken by others. Far more bang for your buck with almost anything else.

      Delete
    8. Your MRE's will be safe to eat as long as the packaging is intact (no punctures, scrapes, leaks, bulging). It's like looking at old canned food, don't worry about date. Look at the paper label for water damage/staining, look for perorations from corrosion, esp. from high-acid foods. Look at dents and creases- foodbank food that has been rough handled with dents now has "short shelf life" due to internal coatings being cracked, so use first/soon. Cans you bought new/in-case and handled carefully have excellent longevity-decades past "best by date" (except high-acid, like citrus/tomatoes). If very paranoid, heat MRE in boiling water with pouch open for 5 minutes or can contents in clean saucepan. Rinse and inspect inside of container for damage for additional confidence of food safety. Vitamins may (will) be decreased, but calories/protein will be there. Got stored vitamins?
      Accessories in MRE have eternal usefulness (matches/gum, wipes).

      pdxr13

      Delete
    9. re: Freeze dried
      The most expensive calories, space-grade food, mylar-packed/vacuum-sealed/dry-nitrogen/o2 reduced/"weaponized" food is awesome, esp. if someone else paid for it 30 years ago. Yep, sometimes perfectly appropriate, but much of the time stepping down to "merely" dried food gets you many of the advantages (the ones you need? less weight, room-temp, dense-calories, 6-month+ storage) at a fraction of the cost. The LDS canneries double-down on advantages of dried food by vacuum-packing in #10 plated steel cans in 6-pack boxes (stack easy, not too heavy for medium woman to lift to/from 5' high) for 20+ year storage on dry-cool-dark shelf.

      pdxr13

      Delete
  2. Your book should be arriving this Wednesday James. I also added your name to the C/O fish column as well, as to avoid any confusion, is that unnecessary?

    ReplyDelete
  3. I've designed schools and prisons, ever notice they are looking and functioning more and more the same?

    To lock people out you have to lock people in, and verse vicea.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. There's a HS named for the not-president on our largest FRN being remodeled near me with a "track" being excavated that is being surrounded with what could easily be "processing and admin" buildings for a FEMA camp. High ground all around a bowl for shooter overwatch and difficult escape for a mob. Not nice.

      pdxr13

      Delete
    2. In these times of budgetary constraints, I'm glad to see "two-fers". Babysitting center for juveniles, propaganda and gladiator entertainment center, centralized storm gathering location, serf camping area. Build now while we have the materials.

      Delete
    3. 104 million bucks spent is something like HighSchoolFEMAcampSortingCenterSportsPavilion is a "4-fer", just not for Americans.

      Yep, do it while you have the Diesel to run the machines. No way will the population tolerate enslavement for a hand-dig. Most of us have semi-autos and cases of ammo for this eventuality.
      The "debt" will be paid off with a half-dozen eggs a decade after Secretary Gono has his way with the shortage of paper money.

      pdxr13

      Delete

I must moderate-trust me. You don't want to see what happens otherwise. Sometimes it takes awhile to respond as I only check two or three times a day. No N-Bombs, nothing to get me libeled. Otherwise, have at it. If you criticize me, make sure to praise my hair first.