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Thursday, May 16, 2019

micro worries macro plans


MICRO WORRIES MACRO PLANS
As survivalists and preppers, we worry about a whole lot.  Or, at least, I worry a whole lot and you all look at me funny, like I just farted in the church pew and it was obviously a wet one.  But I’m going to go ahead and assume I’m not the only crazy one and include all of you in the above generalized statement.  We worry about Libtards.  We worry about more freedom lost.  We worry about gun control and mandatory cash-less transactions and NSA spying and rigged voting and nuclear warheads over Iran.  We worry so much I always have something to write about.
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In one sense of course we are correct to worry.  If you don’t identify problems we cannot migrate their effects.  Since we worry about Peak Oil ( okay, I know for sure that I’m the only one who does and you all look at me like I’m the crazy one ) we get solar panels and get rid of our cars ( yeah, I know-I’m cracking myself up here ).  Since we figure the banks will “bail IN”, we bury our cash in the back yard.  At least that cannot rust, like our buried guns.
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Speaking of which, I’d say bury half of the same kind of guns you have in the house, sell the rest and buy the heck out of ammo.  I know you have too much gun and not enough ammo.  I’ll bet a jelly filled donut on it.  Even if you aren’t concerned with gun confiscation, there is still theft and Not Putting All Your Eggs In One Basket ( I don’t know about you guys, but I think if they do ban all guns it will be rebellion time or forever make peace with your enslavement ). 
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We worry about food shortages from farm country flooding ( personally, I feel our Just In Time imported food paradigm saves us this time although probably not the next one ), so we extend our everyday groceries a couple of more months.  We worry about unemployment so we get out of debt.  There are a million things to worry about.  I certainly am not implying you can stop worrying or that you should.  We are going to worry.  That is who we are and what we do.  But we DO need to try and keep perspective. 
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Most likely, we are worrying about the wrong things anyway.  I mean, if you think about it, the majority of our preps are going to be wrong.  If you worry about job loss, and cut your debt, you have by definition shortchanged the amount you can stockpile or the preps you make.  If you stockpile cash for a credit implosion, you can lose it all to inflation.  If all your money is in a die-off plan worth of ammunition and guns, that is less rent you can pay before homelessness ( if you own, you still rent, with property taxes ).
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No matter what happens, you’ll have made huge counter bet poor investments.   Better than ONLY betting one disaster, but you take my point.  I take solace in two philosophies.  One, you work all your life, period.  You can work for “free”, just renting everything, consuming fleeting assets and have nothing in the end or you can put all your energy into acquiring stuff to act as paycheck trophies, yet that barely matters to anyone but yourself.  You’ve made yourself feel better, but it isn’t much more than a placebo.  And second, the contents of my first book.
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Now, of course you have no excuse for not reading it.  It is free, along with most of my other books, at the web site which is listed at the end of every article.  If you don’t want to spend the time reading its 100 pages, you can instead read the 30 page condensed version.  In essence, all your preps are broken down to just a few basics.  To me, it always just comes down to a few pieces of basic equipment.  Wheat, water filter, a rifle with ammo and really very little else.  No matter how detailed I prep, that is my baseline.
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No matter how wrong or misidentified my worries, as long as I can eat and protect myself, I’m covered.  That is my perspective.  In the end, silver coins and photovoltaic panels, LED lights and squirreled currency, optional rifle optics, even long term coffee supplies ( close to blasphemy, I know ), none of that is really all that important in a big scheme of things view.  In the first grid down winter the only thing that will matter is if I can keep myself warm, and the cause of carbon fuel delivery failure is mostly irrelevant. 
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Really, if you distil things down to bare bones minimums, you are looking at little more than what you can carry, besides the consumables of food and ammunition which are easily cached.  Should you worry about, say, owning junk land ( assuming no other place to go )?  In a way, yes.  And yet, there is also little reason to worry because if worse comes to worse you just go nomad in the wilderness.  The first immigrants didn’t worry about money for land ( most of them were indentured servants, with just the clothes on their backs ).
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They had a few supplies-a flintlock and some powder, an ax and a skillet, say.  They had to do things the hard way, but eating and shelter were simple.  All the other crap they could worry about later.  A retreat is a great thing to have, versus dug-outs in different locations and cached grain, oil and vitamin pills, hauling a grinder, filter and wool clothing to them all.  But it will keep you alive if needs be.  I’m not saying I prefer to go mobile for survival.  I’m saying in the end you just need a few basics to survive.
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All the worry and planning and prepping past that point is just to maintain luxuries.  And, again, there is nothing wrong with that.  I want my electric light to read my books by, as I’m drinking my percolated coffee, wearing clean clothes after I bathe in at least lukewarm water.  I plan of having those things and am invested for that.  I’m just saying that all those worries need not bother you if incomplete or not as extensive as you desire, because the bare bones are taken care of already.  Every luxury should be appreciated.
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Not worried over because you don’t have enough to duplicate today’s levels.  After the collapse, few will care about much more than just staying alive.  You are already miles ahead of their personal problems.  While they were busy filling their shorts in fright because of overwhelming White People Problems, you were laying the bare bones necessities in deep stockpiles.  And you STILL had enough left over to stress about if you should go drop $40 at the theatre watching a Marvel comic movie.  No one is saying you shouldn’t treat yourself for being a Good Little Prepper.  Responsibility should also be rewarded.
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I’ll continue tomorrow with more concrete details on caching and bare bones supplies.
( .Y. )
( today's related Amazon link click here )
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note: free for today books.  EMP here.  
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40 comments:

  1. Correct, following. It is more apt to be a perpetual operational mindset as a Minion ambles about doing his thing. Those deplorablist prepper types generally think in a different wavelength, than the rest of the rubes. Instead of using the turn signal to turn that plastic suv into a fast food or belly glut buffett establishment, those other types fix up their own forms of rations within their own domicile and are as or more happy with that than being amongst the 'cattle people'. Instead of buying chinamart house pretty trinkets with slogans of love and harmony painted on them by thought crime prison laborers, them other types lay in practical use supplies or in demand implements instead, and feel they got the better deal by far. The little nuanced differences on the micro level are what makes preppers and especially the upper echelon ones like the Minionite membership way ahead of the curve of reality based living, and fully ready for anything macro. Carry on .......

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    1. Coneheads are visiting. Sad Panda. We've got them at least eating one meal a day here, which they get excited about, overeat, exclaim how wonderful it is. Then go right back to eating fast food. And this is me cooking, so it is as basic as it gets. Meat and taters or Mexican, mostly. But oodles and gobs better than anything sold in troughs to the public. Yet, so lazy they wouldn't dream of doing the same thing. Better to earn more to eat out. I've eaten out once this year, and it was terrible ( DQ-once a treat, now rancid oil and strange ingredients ). How do people do it every day? How do they earn $50k a year and have no savings? It's an insane asylum out there. I thought I was turning recluse because of my old age, now I just think people went bat crap crazy.

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    2. Cooking a decent, not restaurant quality, decent meal just requires the cook to GAF. Can you read (a recipe), can you follow directions (the recipe), can you measure, can you keep track of time? Not hard

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    3. "...pretty trinkets with slogans of love and harmony..."

      LOL
      Don't forget that especially noxious "believe".

      "How do people do it every day?"
      (eating out trash)

      It's amazing idn't it?
      Our son's tribe will be here again in July and the eatfest will be in full swing. My wife partakes, as she is addicted to that grand daughter, but I bail right out of the gate. I just can't take all that eating 3 times a day. And with all the diseases amongst the urban proles it takes a special kind of retarded to jump right in the middle. I love my son to death but it went off the rails when he set out on his own and try as I might he keeps resisting my snippets of wisdom. There's nothing I can do for him and them. In a major grid down scenario he and his tribe won't be permitted to enter and I have made peace with myself in understanding that if my wife gives me shit about she'll be on the other side of the wall too. When the rubber hits the road I'm the only one that gets to make life decisions about my life. You're either on board or over board, there is no middle ground.

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    4. Good you can make the hard decisions. Not all family is created equal. My sister, I wouldn't piss on her head if her hair was on fire. So, by association, her spawn are rejected out of hand. They might be great people. Hard to believe, living under her roof, but anything is possible. But it wouldn't matter. You can't wish resources or positive behavior into existence.

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    5. 1:59-food at the grocery is so damn cheap ( right now...knock on wood ), you can become a decent cook just by screwing up a few meals and you are barely out any money. Then, you pay that back within a few meals savings. I can't remember, I'm guessing about fifteen years ago, it was no longer cheaper to eat out than eat in. It actually used to make sense to eat out as the cost savings were negligible. But then, as the ingredients went to hell, the costs tripled. Who actually things its a great deal to go eat out? Even one small potato worth of fries is near $2. But worse it just tastes like crap. No longer a treat, now it all tastes like generic frozen foods.

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    6. These are dingo bucks here. But I worked in a food factory. The company paid less for a 500ml bottle of Vanilla Essence than I did for 50ml at the discount supermarket. Similar cost differentials across the board.

      But Dingo bucks - roughly $5 per person for a meat & steamed veggie meal. I was losing weight when I'd make an extra serve and take that for lunch. Now I'm eating a pie & coke and for some reason my weight is piling back on.

      My favourite (cause I'm cheap) is 2 cups of Jasmine rice (it's rice for _a_ meal, not stockpiling so I can justify the extra $$) cooked in the rice cooker (dang I'm lazy) then raw egg mixed in with soy sauce. It's some Japanese comfort food according to my friend. My wife likes to add sweet chilli sauce to it as well. Easy peasy to cook and so very cheap. Cup of rice, an egg and some flavouring. Best thing? Forget the egg & you've got a meal that you can stockpile (soy sauce lasts forever... no really)

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    7. Lord Bison. It was me at 1:59 - posting from work

      Last week was mothers day here in Dingoland. My family all have plenty of disposable income. I do not. So of course we went out for lunch. When that happens I always, always order the cheapest thing on the menu. I walk away paying 1 hour 15 minutes wages for my meal.

      One time, my brother organised a meal at a Japanese restaurant. I looked up the menu & called him back saying GFYS I can't afford those prices. My father picked up the tab. Long story short the bill for the family exceeded my weeks pay. Who TF can afford that? that's ridiculous! Dang, I'm getting angry just thinking about that day. On the upside though... Wowsers was it yummy!

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    8. I'd say the cheapest here on the menu is one hours wage. Do you guys do the whole "GMO, hormone meat, cellulose addition, factory farm, corporations paying back mergers costs" food? If you are eating more wholesome food, more decentralized, I'd say you are getting a better deal than we are.

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  2. “No matter how wrong or misidentified my worries, as long as I can eat and protect myself, I’m covered.”


    And don’t forget clothing, and ideally, a good sleeping bag. With good clothing and a good sleeping bag, you could technically survive without a shelter. Not saying that anyone should try this, but you could if you had to. Right now is the time to get a sleeping bag. A synthetic, low temperature rating sleeping bag can be had for well under $100. The caveat being that the cheaper bags are not lightweight, as are those designed for backpacking.

    As far as the wilderness nomadic option, while not ideal, it is an option. The trick is to go somewhere that is not easily accessible by motor vehicle. I would think that you would want to have a cache system in place. A simple, walk away shelter is the best option in this scenario, so probably a wickiup would be the best choice here. Caves, or other natural earth sheltered, would be better, but have the unfortunate disadvantage of being stationary. According to one evasion and escape publication that I read, once you get about 25 miles out by foot, you’ve eliminated 99% of the population. Other than the serious backpacking types, most Americans are simply too lazy, or in too poor of health, to make it such distances without motorized aid.

    Here in Commiefornia, a prime candidate would be the Donnells Reservoir area:

    “The difficulty of getting to Donnells Reservoir is undoubtedly a part of its charm. The waters are never crowded. In fact, many visitors find themselves completely alone on the 425-acre lake.”

    https://www.lakelubbers.com/donnells-reservoir-2415/

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    1. I think in this case, heavier is better because you need the longevity ( re_ light weight sleeping bag ). Food and ammo is cached, so your daily weight is not insane anyway. Probably covered tomorrow ( memory hazy on what I wrote a week ago ).

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    2. A wool blanket will keep you warm even if it's wet.

      I'm 100% on board with caching. If a minion is really motivated one could cache items that'd make creating an OK shelter easier & more comfy (Bisons plastic sheeting idea)

      I suspect having multiple locations would be a good idea. Doing so would give a minion options.

      The beauty of the BISON approach is that you *can* have multiple locations because the cost isn't as prohibitive as the Rawles plan

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    3. A few years ago I bought (4) 12'x12' camo tarps for about $15 each. Each, I spread out on the garage floor then folded 10 about 18" wide, then tightly rolled up while pushing trapped air out. Then I took (2) 50' lengths of paracord and wrapped the rolls and tied them off. That roll, and a fold-up handsaw, is my tried and true shelter. I've used it several times and it works excellent. I use the saw to cut down an appropriate sapling about 12' long. I cut 2 pieces of paracord and lash the sapling across 2 trees about 8'-10' apart, about 4' above the ground. I drape the tarp over the sapling. I had previously cut all the branches off the sapling and I carve some of them into thin stakes that I pound down through the perimeter grommets along the back edge. I let the front edge hang down a foot or so and use paracord through grommets to lash the tarp to the sapling. Since the tarp is 12' wide and the sapling is 8' that allows about 2' to hang down on the sides to prevent some rain from coming in. A fire about 6' out from the front and it stays nice and cozy in that lean to. Packing back up is easy as long as you don't mind a few leaves getting rolled up, plus the roll will be a little bigger. So, $15 for the tarp, about $10 for the cordage, about $20 for the saw. $45 for your home away from home.

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    4. 2:04-plus, my plans leave enough money for multiple FLIR scopes. Happy Panda!

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    5. Usually, the lightweight bags are down, but I don’t recommend them. Down bags are awesome, until you need to clean them, or they get wet. And really, you do need to dry clean them. Some will say that you can wash them, but they won’t be the same after you do (I found this out the hard way after washing my “washable” down jacket). You can get lightweight, cold weather, synthetic bags, but they’re expensive, and generally not as warm as they’re rated.

      I recall that one minion previously reported that the park personnel found his forest cache. Though I would think that this would ordinarily be unlikely, unless you were trying this in an area with a lot of people traffic. A GPS would be handy, but do not rely on one to find your cache post collapse, and be well versed in topo map and compass.

      When you consider the above, the junk land seems like such a good idea, even if it’s only used as a cache location.

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    6. @2:04 Yes, I was going to mention a wool blanket in my last comment, but left it out, because in extreme cold climates, you would have to supplement it with fire, and post collapse, this might not be feasible. This could be an option for some, in less extreme climates. But if you had high quality clothing, than perhaps you could forgo the fire.

      I got both of my Hudson Bay blankets off of Ebay (Used, but in good condition) for about a $100 each. These were the 4 point. Ideally, you would want at least the 6 point, but you won’t find those cheap on Ebay, or anywhere else for that matter (They’re about $400). There are other high quality brands of wool blanket, but off the top of head, I can’t name them (Pendleton, Filson Mackinaw perhaps?)

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    7. Donnells Reservoir...
      I've been there, but haven't been on the water or explored it. Here are some potential problems. The lake is at 5000', but the surrounding terrain is much higher, with large boulders and rock slabs everywhere. During the winter, it's a cold-air sink, so it'll be significantly colder than the already cold terrain around it. They mention some primitive campsites, but you'd be pretty much landlocked there because of the steep terrain around it. You'd be at constant risk of snow and rock avalanche all winter long. You brought a solar oven to cook with?
      Not during the winter since the steep canyon walls down to the lake will block the low-angle winter sun.
      Hypothetically say that NOW you went back to the primitive campsite to cache some supplies. I'm pretty sure that every place where there's enough soil within a safe walk from the campsites are the same places where people are already digging in the ground when they want to defecate. I can't imagine the soil (decomposed granite) would be deep enough to keep squirrels and marmots from easily digging around it. In the winter you wouldn't be able to dig your cache out because the "soil" would be frozen solid. I'm not trying to rain on your parade, just giving some ideas to think about.
      Peace out

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    8. @3:15, I would guess most sleeping bags are too big for most residential washer and dryers. Maybe a larger rig at a laundromat? I wear down vests in the winter and a trick I learned was to throw 3 tennis balls in the dryer with them and they break up the balled up feathers so they fluff up. Works excellent.

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    9. I was 2:04

      I'm thinking about the pathfinder wool blanket. Yeah, I know. Super expensive. They're all expensive. I think it's one of those things it's hard to escape paying decent money. Wool blankets aren't exactly plentiful here in Dingoland.

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    10. Didn't you guys just have a cold snap somewhere?

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  3. Did you say Coneheads? Old school for sure brother!
    2 minutes of when SNL characters were funny.
    https://youtu.be/KGv-zFXffg4

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    1. I can't take credit-the NOL calls all young punks coneheads. It really fits her spawn.

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  4. Tell the Coneheads to go to Knotts Berry Farm or Raging Waters I'm sure they would feel right at home food and people wise.

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    1. They would live in McDonald's if they could.

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  5. You have probably read this, but....https://oilprice.com/Energy/Crude-Oil/The-Shale-Boom-Is-About-To-Go-Bust.html.

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  6. Fracking fantasy: The suite of drilling techniques “have lowered costs and allowed the resource to be extracted with fewer wells, but have not significantly increased the ultimate recoverable resource,” J. David Hughes, an earth scientist, and author of the Post Carbon report, warned. Technological improvements “don’t change the fundamental characteristics of shale production, they only speed up the boom-to-bust life cycle,” he said.

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    1. Just ignore that guy. Glen Beck assured us we have a minimum of 100 years of fracking oil.

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  7. @Dingo

    Just checked out that pathfinder blanket. Considering the size and weight, that’s actually a pretty reasonable price. If you want a bargain blanket, then look for military wool blankets. The problem is that the better one’s have been mostly bought up, and the remaining one’s have gone up in price a lot, but are still reasonable, considering. The Italian wool blankets, when you can find them, are one of the better blankets (100% wool, and heavy; 5.5lbs). The best that I’ve ever seen, was the Dutch navy wool blanket. 100% wool, large, and 6lbs, 6oz (1st link below).

    ($150 US, but clearly the superior blanket)

    https://colemans.com/dutch-navy-100-wool-blanket-w-red-stripe

    ($125 US. New, but looks like a high quality repro)

    https://www.amazon.com/Italian-Wool-Blanket-Super-Heavy/dp/B00CX8U1CE/ref=sr_1_3?keywords=italian+army+wool+blanket&qid=1558105860&s=gateway&sr=8-3


    @peace out. Donnells lake was just a suggestion. That’s not my actual plan, as I own junk land. I was just saying that if you plan to go nomadic as an option, that you will need to find an inhospitable place to weed out the others, but really, if you just went far enough out in an area that is hostile to motor vehicles, you will be ahead of the game. Again, I’m suggesting this to anyone.

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    1. I have a real problem with $100 blankets. You can get three Almost As Good for the same price. When 1 Is None, how many expensive wool blankets or premier AR-15's can you stock? Not saying they aren't worth it, just that you had better be able to duplicate.

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    2. I have my doubts that a cheaper wool blanket can even come close in quality to a high end brand Jim. There are many factors to consider. Quality of stitching (cheap one's come apart easy, or shed a lot when washed) wool content (obviously 100% wool is best) as well as the type of wool. That said, it is entirely dependant on your situation. If you have an adequate shelter, then yes, the cheap wool blankets will more than suffice. Now let's try a different scenario, say that of the wilderness nomad dude. Then you would want that heavy weight, higher quality blanket. The early mountain men mostly used the Hudson Bay blankets, and swore by them. That's why I suggested the synthetic bag in my initial post. Because in reality (as much as I love wool blankets; nearly having a sexual fetish for them :D ) the synthetic sleeping bag is simply the better choice, being more durable and warmer than a blanket is capable of being. Also half the price or less, of a high end wool blanket.

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    3. You are probably correct with the quality issue. I might be giving the $30 blankets too much credit. That doesn't change the fact that you can only buy what you can afford to duplicate, however. And you are correct about synthetics versus wool. While sleeping in the unheated trailer ( and even the unheated B-POD ), JUST wool didn't work. I had to place synthetics under and over the wool. Which is why I wonder how good one sleeping bag is. The worst months in the RV, it was usually in the teens to twenties inside at night. I needed two synthetic thin comforters, two or three wool ( probably about 3 lb each ) blankets and a fake feather comforter on top.

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    4. One good cold weather synthetic bag, would have been perfect for your RV needs Jim. You can get one rated for about 0º for around $50 at sportsman’s guide. Totally worth it.

      When I was still employed, but poor, I camped a few months out of the year to save on motel costs (I lived outside of the area that I worked, and motel costs were eating me alive). I would start in April usually, and it was still cold at night, even in Commiefornia. I brought along my down comforter that I got from sportsman’s guide for $50, and threw it over the top of my sleeping bag, which was already pretty thick. This did the trick, but a better choice is to have a cold weather rated sleeping bag. The synthetic bags are currently priced very friendly; really, a steal, considering.

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    5. Yeah, I really need to get over my dislike for sleeping bags. Too much time spend in them with Uncle Sam.

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    6. Thanks for the info & opinion on Wool Blankets. One important point to add in favour (see the 'u' in that word? English :-) ) of a 100% wool blanket that wasn't mentioned is it's fire proof (resistance). That's a big plus in my eyes and area.

      I priced up the Pathfinder landed in Dingoland. Thanks to rubbish exchange rate AND that we're on the other side of the planet I'm looking at over two days salary. Disposable income wise it's.... well let's not go there. However I do have an "income" stream. Here we get $0.10 per can / bottle in a deposit scheme. I scored $20 (no lie) scabbing out of some dudes recycling bin (he had put the cans back into the carton they come in so it was no biggie). Mate at work tells me some people are bringing in $700 a week.

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    7. Of course, the BAD thing about 100% wool is the thing is a whore to clean. I used to be able to find Woolite soap ( generic ) at the dollar store. Now all I'm finding is the "real" $8 bottle. No thank you. Plus, to dry wool it must lay flat and not be hung up. Two strikes. Obviously, be careful the blanket isn't something stupid like 50% blend, but a 10-20% blend might allow regular washing.

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  8. Sorry about that Dingo. I didn’t take into account the exchange rate, and high shipping rates for your region of the world. I can’t speak for your part of the world, but here in the US, the best bargains are found on Ebay.

    In consideration of the above, I’d just go for the bargain wool blanket. Try to get as heavy and large of a blanket as you can get, with as high of a wool content as possible. A less than 100% wool blanket might still be a decent blanket. Ideally, you want to be able to wrap more than one layer of wool over yourself in colder climes (See the Dave Canterbury video below on wool blankets). Though you could always sew two smaller blankets together, to make one big blanket.

    Jim is probably right, in that the bargain wool blankets are probably a better buy. Admittedly, I’m a wool blanket snob, and will buy the best if I can afford it. But what I’ve found is that I usually don’t want to risk the expensive blankets for camping, so I end up just using the cheaper blankets regardless. You can also purchase lanolin supplement to restore the water repellent properties to your wool blankets.

    For the price, this Swiss army style blanket is pretty nice, and it’s heavy (I have one).

    https://www.sportsmansguide.com/product/index/swiss-army-style-wool-blanket-new?a=1123939

    Here’s a real Swiss army blanket (used) and it’s a 100% wool ($62 here in the US)
    https://www.sportsmansguide.com/product/index/swiss-military-surplus-wool-blanket-used?a=2151030

    I also bought a couple of the Bulgarian H3 blankets. Apparently the wool content is fairly low, and I can’t comment on the long term durability of them. But they are thick and heavy, and very soft. I like them a lot, but unfortunately, they are a standard sized blanket, which isn’t much help for the bigger blokes.

    https://www.sportsmansguide.com/product/index/bulgarian-military-surplus-wool-blend-officer039s-blanket-used?a=1687351

    Wool Blankets Winter Camping Part 2 (Jump to the 4:00 mark to cut to the part on wool blankets)

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=waNdI9zKYug

    Elko Minion

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  9. Thanks for the tips on Wool Blankets. Fortunately I have plenty of time to research them thanks to $$$ but on the negative side we are approaching Winter here.

    Touch wood, no apocalypse before then

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    1. You'd think with all those damn sheep there...

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