Saturday, January 4, 2020

peev2c9part2


PEEv2c9part2
Location, continued
I hope everyone realizes that the perfect survival location doesn't exist. Let me save you $40 ( so how very welcome you are ) and tell you that you don't need a coffee table book with pretty pictures on survival relocation. They are hopelessly out of date, as nuclear war targets are as antiquated as the Soviet Union. Nuclear weapons are in much shorter supply than they were when such target lists made sense. Not to say those nukes won't still kill us all. They will. They are now spent fuel rods at nuclear power plants.
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I would say to avoid direct downwind locations from these power plants, and then you can pretty much forget nukes as a viable worry. Sure, something could still happen. If Hilary had been elected we all would probably be glowing in the dark right now. But the odds of an asteroid strike are probably much higher, and I never read of a relocation to the Rocky Mountains because of an asteroid ocean strike concern, not since the fiction Lucifer's Hammer came out. You cannot plan for everything, so why plan around the lesser odds?
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These books never are up to date, never include The Great California And New Jersey Exodus trends, never touch on the Great Pale Replacement Program From Latin America, or the quick “purpleing” of a lot of former freedom states. They are as worthless as a FLIR scope atop a Swiss designer battle rifle ( with bottle cap opener in the stock ). You need to pick the place YOU want to live. Your variables are different than any authors, or his readers.
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Pick the climate and the culture you desire. Culture is VERY important. I've moved to many different locations and in many of them I was NOT comfortable with the people there. Hawaii might have the perfect climate, but White boys are as welcome there as a darkie at a Klan convention. I grew up in California, but the last time I was there, even before political correctness exploded into GroupThink, the place was lousy with bat crap crazy. Neither climate or culture could save it for me. If you weren't born in Texas, you'll probably not be comfortable living there ( that goes double for Louisiana ).
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Find Your People. Then find the land you'll enjoy. Most of us preppers are older now, having joined the movement during the most dangerous 80's ( we also got a start in the job market when there was one, and have always had the option of stockpiling, economically ). As such, we don't have many years left. So don't waste them. Don't move to a spot because it seems perfect for survival. Pick people, THEN climate, and LAST, the safest place among those two. Trust me, a stranger in a strange land is a miserable existence.
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Since there is no perfect survival spot, don't be fooled into moving there. Pick the least worst spot. I think the high desert is magical for survival. These are my people here ( as much as there can be, nowadays ). I love the cold over the heat. I love having a 300 mile moat of desolate land around me, protecting me from western Californians, southern Las Vegas'ans, eastern LDS'ers and northern Rawlesians. I love potatoes and mutton, about all you can raise here. But I didn't pick my land based on food production, rather economically.
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We are in an economic collapse. We have been, if not from 2000 ( tech wreck, far more devastating economically than we admit ) then from no later than 2005 ( peak oil globally ). In case you didn't get the memo, this is longer than the Great Depression lasted. I submit to you this is THE last Oil Age, Industrial Age economic collapse. I moved with the economy in mind. Not because this area had gold mines. They aren't long term viable, even with gold at $1900 or diesel at $2.50 a gallon ( too diffuse of ore ). They hang on as many other corporations do ( including fracking ), central bank money manipulation. No, I moved here because of affordable land ( among the other high desert spots I considered ).
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Is it the perfect survival spot? Far from it. Not because I can't grow my own food. That is overrated and not very practical for most of our budgets. A decades worth of wheat is one twentieth an acre of farmland's cost. I'll have to go raiding for food, if I want any, more than likely. I don't feel bad about that, as it isn't raiding fellow survivalists for their storage food. I have my own stockpile. No, it is just a tax on farmers to keep a safe buffer state around them, to keep out invading farmers from outside my land. And of course, trade is always a viable option for them, even if on terms favorable to us rather than them.
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Yes, I know, I won't live to see that, more than likely. But you plan, regardless. Plans to deal with imperfection are easier than chasing a mythical perfection. Something is always going to be wrong with where you pick to live, where your survival location is and what you do to prepare. You could pick a pretty decent location, then afterwards get the neighbors from Hell. You could have a perfect job at your new location, then the company goes bankrupt. Pick, and move, and try to make your decisions as if the ass falls out of the economy tomorrow.
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I know you want to plan for the apocalypse, but realistically you must plan for the economic collapse and then hope you made the correct choices for the die-off and Dark Ages. The economy is already collapsing, and not all apocalypse preps are good economy preps. As much as it would be smart to stock fifty thousand rounds of ammo, it is smarter to pay off the land and then only have fifteen thousand rounds of ammo. Because the repo man takes the house before it is feasible to shoot him.
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I was able to move to my retreat land, because it is terrible for a retreat, only being six miles from town. I chose it as an off-grid home because I could bike to work, and I biked to work so I could pay off the land very quickly ( in case I became unemployed ). I picked the town because there was plenty of cheap land outside it ( inside the city limits, prices are insane. Outside, very reasonable with reasonable zoning laws ). This was all done under a collapsing economy ( 2008 ). If I had waited, I might have gotten a better retreat. OR, I might have seen an even worse economy and become unemployed and then been unable to prep at all.
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I advise moving to the smallest town you can, and still find a job. Pick THAT as it is closest to the cheapest land you can find ( with the other considerations of culture and climate accounted for ). Either rent in town or commute from your land. If you are in town, have a way to bug out to your land ( with most supplies buried ) with a temporary shelter. RV's are the default, but do whatever is in your budget. If you commute, make sure it isn't a death sentence to live out their without a car ( hello! Peak Oil, death of the PetroDollar ).
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As far as East verses West, neither is safer than the other. The East has all the population, but the West has few water sources and they are all a target ( never have a well that needs a mechanical pump. Commute to surface water, and have rain catchment ). I like my odds in the West, but this was where I grew up and am comfortable, not because it is inherently safer. The East has plenty of safe to safer areas in the mountains outside the urban sprawls. I don't like the population in the East, nor the more vibrant members, but you can survive there off farming.
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The West was never viable past small groups of hunter/gatherers. Only coal and oil made it realistic for settlement. Keep that in mind if you choose to live there yourself. It isn't a bad choice, it just takes extra planning and preparation. As does the population density in the East. But there is no wrong choice. Just wrong preps.
( .Y. )
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15 comments:

  1. Right. Selecting a location has to be considered with a long laundry list of concerns tabulated on spreadsheets or some form of intel and administrative study. I web browse locales but there is a devoid of nuts and bolts things a prepper type needs to see on the ground.

    I use Ely, Nv. as a site example. It is a quaint county seat town with hunt fish etc. O.k. for grid up functioning systems. But it has a max security state prison with attendant government structures of state, federal and county. It has a progressive bent creeping in, that usually through the endless weight brought to bear by the idealogical foot soldiers of the leftist or statists overwhelms the local cow county cowboy conservative cultures of the area. It would be akin to being near a pig farm with over spilling odors. Certain areas will have spicey times spilling into your lap from the too nearby negative elements. Recon well and strategize the intel. Those not encamped for good now will have only one shot to use for hermitage selection,(my dilema) with no do overs as time's up.

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    1. City-data.com is pretty good, giving average winter temps, racial make up, major employers, how far away population centers are, etc. It helped me discard a lot of potential junk land ( for instance, several desert acres in Texas, cheap as hell, very close to a river and a very small town. Alas, 10% Whites )

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    2. Yeah internet sourcing data as such is good for process of elimination cues. But, as you kinda know getting a Cop's eyeball view or right brain perspective of visuals of the area are immensly as helpful for final decisions or signing name to paperwork kinda of importance.

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    3. Just visiting a cop shop and talking sweet to the Desk Bitch, stroking their ego, you get an idea of where to stay away from.

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  2. I got my sportsman guide catalog and intend to lay in more cold weather clothes and gear. I live in the low desert for now, barely gets too cold and don't really need them here, BUT..., I have to strategize for no grid, and existing with out heat or power. As well, one may find themselves in real cold country, either from fleeing that primary squat in sunshiney unicorn valleys or using that rougher climate area as a buffer zone or refuge from spicy towns nonsense. 'Merica has by now earned it's turn for seiges and famines to last for many winters. Dig in.

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    1. I was in Florida one January and it actually froze ( Daytona ), getting to 28 or 29. No suitable clothing at all. Riding my bike in that crap. Lesson learned-be ready for not normal weather. The Arctic Vortex here a few years ago ( Jan 2013 ) reinforced that. I got phenomena. Probably didn't help my already small brain. But I did go from Northern Nevada weather at its worse to Southern Alaska weather in my clothing stores.

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    2. Point proven, grand solar minimum cycle or not. It can just get plain cold up in them there Wolverines hills. Just say no to sniveling, and gear up!

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    3. Not as cheap as it was, Sportsman's went Yuppie, but even with back-ups if you stay away from brand name is is still rather cheap. Layering being your buddy and all

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    4. Layering ain't all you think, cause it bulks you up and restricts movement, which can get you injured or killed, depending.

      I just got a set of garments (haven't tried them yet) that are called a "base layer". Long britches and long sleeve tshirt, very thin, silk like and "slippery", allowing the next layer to sort of slide over the base and not get bound up. Supposed to wick off surface moisture.

      My problem with insulated under garments and other layers in general is that they tend to bunch up in certain places becoming uncomfortable and restrictive to movement. My winter warrioring days are behind me and if I ever have to venture out into the arctic elements to deal with assholes I will do so with a hail of shrapnel. Then get back inside in front of the fire.

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    5. I layered for my bike rides and for working outside with deliveries. Not sure what we are doing differently.

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  3. Regulations. Find places that don't think about zoning.

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    1. Rare, but worth the research.

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    2. You can do a lot of undercover work in zoned areas, but places without zoning are full of people who mind their own business. They have not yet decided that how you use your land is their business. In the city, when 40x100 is "property" that can now have up to 4 2500 square foot dwellings, rules and inspectors are how folks don't kill each other right away. Crowding makes crazy! pdxr13

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    3. What about Houston? Or is that apples and oranges?

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  4. You're right about books that tell you where to live in areas in the U.S. I bought one of the expensive books a couple of years back. The area recommended in my city is now being built up with lots of new homes and businesses. One of the worst areas to move to now.

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