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Friday, September 16, 2016

the forever gun book 2


THE FOREVER GUN BOOK 2

PEAK STUFF

As I said, the Forever Gun concept pretty much died with the rise in the cost of copper ( hence brass ).  The 1990’s and the early ‘00’s had a few unique characteristics.  First, the Soviet Union coughed up a bloody lung and died, and the western elites were able, for a time ( I have nothing but respect for Putin-a patriot helps their country rather than rapes it and he did more to save his country than any of our post-Jackson politicians ever did for ours ), to squeeze cheap oil from the country at our usual Captive Colony Near Free Prices.  Second, after discarding the bankrupt corpses of companies that physically re-wired our country for high speed Internet, “online” became a viable business industry.   Third, lowering interest rates worked because of the aforementioned affordable petroleum.  Looking back at the trail of bodies Clinton left, it might be hard to believe, but prior to 9/11 were the last of the good times economically.

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Then came Peak Oil right on schedule.  The concept has been, to a certain understandable degree, overplayed by its proponents ( including myself-I both sped up our demise and overplayed alternate energy.  Not by an embarrassing degree but I also can‘t claim clairvoyance.  My book on Peak Oil is available for free at Lulu.com under the title “Chicken Little Magazine“ ).  Things certainly didn’t go to hell as quick as possible.  We were given a short reprieve and I certainly hope you used it wisely.  Too much was made for the case of quick collapse and not enough attention was paid to EROI-energy return on energy invested.  That certainly would have been more helpful in timing the collapse better ( short take-net energy has fallen so far you should expect dire problems in single years rather than decades ).  And one aspect I don’t think I ever ran across was the forecasting of metal extraction ( not to say it wasn’t out there, even if I did read most popular market books on the subject ). 

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Unnoticed by most was the point where ores became much more diffuse and harder to extract.  A large nugget of ore on or near the surface pure enough to be smelted by low energy fuel is one thing, needing a huge amount of machinery and finance to dig hundreds of feet down and run tons of rock through extraction methods to gain a very small amount of ore dust or pebbles is quite another.  During the ‘90’s we didn’t worry about the lowering quantity and quality because we had dirt cheap oil.  Which both made high tech extraction economically feasible as well as shipping ore across the globe from all other sources previously unexploited.  But when oil peaked for conventional petroleum, several problems cropped up.  The bankers who need increased growth every year ( and growth only comes from surplus energy ) instead saw too much of a decrease, or at least too much of a decrease in the increase of energy supplies every year.  And when we switched over to lower net energy sources ( tar sands, which are little more than a way to turn natural gas into a conventional liquid fuel, and deep water wells and etc. ) we saw the same volume of fuel increase in price as the BTU’s became far more costly to extract.

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There were other knock on effects, but essentially what happened was economic growth crashed and never recovered, and everything cost more in lockstep with energy prices.  Copper prices shot up and hardly ever went back down.  Diffuse ore deposits were more expensive to extract, if they were even worth the effort.  Metal, even iron and steel, went from being too cheap to care if they were thrown away, to becoming very dear and more expensive.  Not to mention transporting them and smelting them imposed more of a cost.  Rimfire went from a frugal shooting past time to an unaffordable wasteful luxury.  You can’t reload rimfire, yo!  For the longest time you couldn’t find the stuff, and when you did you got “lucky” and paid fifteen to twenty cents a round.  It was almost cheaper to get an AK and plink with Russian steel rounds. 

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Rimfire rounds are back in stock but a dime each is a sale if you can find it.  A Rimfire Forever Gun went from $300 to $1300.  Who can afford that?  You can buy a LOT of survival supplies for that, and that includes a firearm that is vastly superior ( although, granted, with less ammo ).  If you are going to pay the money, you want to be able to get a lot more gun for the same price, which is what we cover here.  There are a lot of choices and basically for one to two grand you get a pistol, carbine or rifle and ten thousand rounds.  That number is important.  It is, remember, a Forever Gun.  You can’t just spray and pray and expect your ammunition to last, nor can you buy five hundred rounds of ammunition and expect it to last decades.  Granted, this does NOT speak for your tactics, strategy or luck helping you survive combat.  This is for logistics purposes only.  It assumes you stockpile with paranoia in mind.

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Again, and I repeat, this is a treatise on an OPTIONAL strategy.  I don’t claim this is viable financially for everyone.  I am just saying that if you can afford a bit extra, I’m going to point out how to minimize that extra cost.  Po’ Boy Redneck Survivalists are going to have to be content with their single rifle of war surplus variety, a few hundred rounds of factory ammo and a few reloading components, and hope for the best.  Which should be a priority before you even think of this project.  Once you do embrace it, you need to think about juggling maximum round count, maximum wounding potential, maximum tactical advantage, longest life and most affordable.

END

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36 comments:

  1. Forever type guns are getting to the point price wise I am seriously considering how to convert a firearm into a platform for a crossbow or spring gun. It may be more cost efficient and allow for usability of more types of ammunition.
    There may be 400 million guns in the USA, but I doubt there are 400 billion rounds of ammo (1,000 rounds per gun). Being able to convert to something easily usable that you can easily produce ammo for will be a big advantage to a firearm with too little ammo. (of course the best option is a firearm with plenty of ammo - if you can afford it.)

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    1. Just keep in mind the superior stopping power of firearms over bolts/arrows.

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    2. Aborginals in Australia were quick to trade in there spears for cheap 22lr single shots even for killing big dangerous game like water buffalo, crock and wild cattle. Aussie

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    3. THANK YOU!! This illustrates my point perfectly.

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    4. I bought my ten thousand rounds ( actually 12,000 ) of 22 lr about 15 years ago lol. Also two 10/22s at the same time frame.
      Working on the ten thousand arrows now hee hee....

      Came into some extra cash a few days ago...went and spent it on more grain... can't have enuff grain !

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    5. I've got my prep spending under control. Right now, I'm focusing on more unemployment savings. Still need to spend a little every payday. Because, no, you can't ever have enough of fundamentals. Just as I recovered from the sugar purchase, along came a sale on a jacket in Sportsmans. My M65 has been literally falling apart for years and they had a Spanish military surplus at half price. Can't have enough cold weather gear for here.

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  2. too bad they don't make more (and cheaper) of these.. http://cz-usa.com/product/cz-527-carbine-223-rem/

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    1. holy sweet mother of jesus h Christ on a pogo stick! That is seriously over priced.

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    2. Why in the world would anyone pay THAT much for that gun?

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    3. Why would anyone spend $2k on an AR with scope and bells and whistles? $5k for a FLIR? $2k per person per year packaged food? More dollars than sense/cents.

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  3. I am currently searching for 2 more guns with no paperwork. A Henry AR7 https://www.henryrifles.com/rifles/u-s-survival-ar-7/ and a Ruger Mk II http://www.gunbroker.com/item/583426057 , both are .22's. I already have all the other bases covered.

    Used and unregistered to me is hard to find and expensive, so I keep looking.

    Both will go in my Blazer as well as a brick of hollow points, cleaning kit, and various other supplies. Truck guns.

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    1. I've never been that impressed with either one, but then all of you could say the same of my picks.

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    2. I've owned both many decades ago and lost both to bad circumstances. The MKII (the lower number models (I and II) are the oldest and the best - newer models are lots of plastic and bad quality control. Probably the most accurate and fastest 22 auto pistol out there, and very comfortable in the hand.

      I have a case for recip saw I wore out and the AR will go in it with some ammo and a kit and lay on the floor in front of the backseat. If I can find one for less than $200 I'll get it. I currently have plenty of guns and ammo but I'm always looking.

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    3. There is a "good" version of the AR-7 that's not wobbly. The Ruger MkII pistol is fetching too much premium over the MKIII, imho. What people hate about the Ruger pistols is the take-down, but there is an aftermarket kit for a hexbolt bolt release that keeps everything from wearing to looseness if you like to clean. Removing the chamber-loaded indicator makes the action better, as does deleting the magazine-required-to-fire system. Ultrasonic dip cleaning is another option. A tuned-up Ruger MK is an easy accurate shooter, and then there's the cute SR-22.

      pdxr13

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    4. I have a deep distrust of firearms that must be improved once out of the factory.

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    5. Back before my accident, I went and bought a Ruger 22/45 lite and every after market widget known to man ,for it.
      It has a holographic red dot sight, and you can dump ten rounds inside of a fifty cent piece, at twenty yards in under five seconds. Very accurate fast pistola !
      Now days...of course, I would not buy such toys.
      Sure glad I've been prepping, since Christ was a corporal ha ha. Gave me a lot of years to load up on the essential items, long ago.
      Like you Jim I've got maybe five years storage of long term food for two people.
      Until you have such...do not buy toys !!

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    6. Toys are fun. I bought a few pre-Y2k when I had a period of extra income ( the extra wheat I bought, on two separate occasions, long ago abandoned in moves and replaced ). I'm ashamed of them and keep them hidden. Granted, needed and useful, but way overpriced. Yuppie Survivalist overpriced.

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    7. Well if we're gonna start talkin about toys from the past....

      Back in the early 80's a guy I know bought 3 brand new Cobray Mac 11's in 9mm for $500. He sold me and another guy 1 each for $250 and kept the 3rd one for himself - for free! It was a fun gun, 32 rds, and actually pretty accurate, but uncomfortable to hold and shoot. Heavy and awkward. This was about the time when the bad guys on Miami Vice (I was living in Florida at the time) were using them to spray n pray. My thumb still hurts from loading that thing.

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    8. That's not a bad toy to be bragging on.

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  4. I've given this some thought James, and this is what I come up with.

    Start by browsing through the rifle calibers offered in the Lee Loader. They are: .223, .243, .270, 45/70, 30/30, 7.62 x 54 Russian, .308, 30/06, .303 British. The Lee Loader is not the fastest method of reloading, but it's $40, and we're on a budget.

    Next, pick a caliber and a gun. The .223 is the most economical of them all (we're talking about a forever rimfire replacement in this example). So find a .223 bolt or single shot. I recommend the single shot if you can find one. It will be cheaper, and I don't think that a bolt is really that much faster to operate by the time that you work the bolt and get back on target. The range capability of the little .223 also buys you some safe distance.

    Next, pick up a bullet mould. Yes, they will be crappy lead bullets, but has anyone priced jacketed bullets lately? They're definitely not priced in forever dollars. Afterwards, hit up your friendly local automotive tire guy for some free lead.

    Had a heck of a time finding a Lee chart for this caliber, but did find a chart that suggested 21.5 grains of IMR 4198. Round that down to 20, and that gives you 350 rounds out a 1lb can of powder (7000 grains). For a plinking load, and general eradication load, you can probably download them even less, say 15 grains, or 466 loads. Don't have a .223, and you would have to experiment, but if you can get away with 10 grains of powder as a general purpose load, that's 700 rounds per can.

    http://www.gundigest.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/08/223Reloading-3-680.jpg

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    1. Which is only about $600 for powder and primers ( for 10 k rounds ). Plus whatever brass is. I saw 25 cent stuff but am unsure how many times you can reload them. Better than the rimfire, perhaps, price wise. Certainly better performance. I cover this in #3 article in this series,

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    2. The problem with reloading is that in a gun fight you will fight like you practice. So under stress your quiet likely to stop to pick up your empty shells when you should be consentrateing on your target dodging incomeing. Aussie

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    3. A bolt action is much faster than a single shot. The fastest technique is your thumb and forefinger (middle too if you want) never leave the bolt, and you use your ring finger to pull the trigger. Even working the bolt fast using this technique, there is no reason for your sights to ever be off target unless recoil is a factor. You can even keep your sights mostly on target shooting a RH bolt gun left handed, as on the left side of an obstacle. Practice running your bolt left and right handed, aiming with your left and right eye, regardless of which eye is dominant.
      Peace out

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    4. By nature I dislike rapid fire on bolts-it encourages semi-spray tactics. Fine on the battlefield in volley of fire, wasting irreplaceable ammo after the collapse.

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    5. I saw 5.56 M193 Ball ammo for $325 per thousand rounds at our local gun shop the other day.
      Buddy of mine got some free passes to the range when he bought a Sig PR91. Nice rifle but way expensive !
      Course he has more money than sense....
      It shot nice too...

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    6. Sorry, but I can't help myself but to mention: why is ammo affordable right now, if only politics matter rather than resource depletion? ( ammo is cheap right now, perhaps, because the economy is suffering and less can afford it? )

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    7. Perhaps, because the military is consuming less at the moment shooting little brown people ?

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    8. Are we even doing anything in Afghanistan now, or just holding bases? You have a good point. Are we too broke to keep fighting?

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  5. When folks online were complaining about the shortages of rime fire ammo in America, 22lr was both cheap and plentiful here in Australia, even though most of it was imported from the US. A couple of years ago I was buying Remington bucket of bullets(1200 rounds) for $70 while I was reading that they were next to unprocurable in the US. 22lr has since sky rocketed in price over here but availability is still good. .... Aussie

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    1. I was used to paying $18 for 1100 rounds. Anything more is giving up the ONLY thing a rimfire has going for it which is affordability. If lack of recoil was so important I'd go with an AR.

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  6. Another way to look at it (again, the "BIC approach" as mentionned a few days earlier).

    What is your current lighter ? Is it the Zippo your granddaddy gave you ? Or some fancy gold/whatever stuff ?

    Chances are, it is a BIC lighter. Sometimes you lose it, sometimes a friend "borrows" it etc.

    So a Forever Gun has to be sturdy and inexpensive, so you can have several of them or replace them readily. Surplus Rifles used to fill these criteria until mass demand drove their price up. If Mosin-Nagant rifles were still in vast abundance you would look no further (never mind that gas bleeding story) because you would acquire five of them at 100 dollars each (and the first one would actually never break down in the first place because it's so damn sturdy).

    So I would look at the criteria of sturdiness, affordability and availability before looking at features or precision.

    So far what I think might be a list of equivalence for the survivalist interested in the BIC approach :

    The Savage Axis ($300) is the BIC equivalent of the Remington 700 category of weapons
    The Hi-Point C9 ($150) is the BIC equivalent of the Glock pistols
    The Hi-Point Carbine ($250) is the BIC equivalent of the AR-15 for practical purposes (you're never going to shoot at 400m , or perhaps three shots in your lifetime with the Savage Axis...)

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    1. I did an article on the Bic Approach-I think posted for Monday.

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  7. The historians will have the last word...but I too, am a Vlad Putin fan. Has he been enriching himself? Don't know and don't care. I just have the feeling that,
    a) he has the interests of his nation at heart, and,
    b) he runs rings around Mr. Obama and Mr. Kerry.

    I don't know if the story is true but I'd read that he gathered the Oligarchs and said...you keep your money but two things: you pay taxes on it and you stay out of politics. That sounds pretty pragmatic to me...

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    1. The historians will more likely be spreading the tales orally around the camp fires.

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  8. Came across this link a few weeks back James, and was contemplating if it was something that might be of interest to you. It mentions a couple that left my home state of the PRK, the Redoubt, and even the #1 prepper dude. In typical left wing MSN fashion though (where I found the link) I get the impression that it subtly attempts to portray all prepper/survival types as a crazy lot. You might be able to get an article idea from it?

    http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/a-fortress-against-fear/ar-AAia185?getstaticpage=true&ocid=mailsignout

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    1. They should love preppers-we love spending money. I'll check it out-thanks.

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