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Saturday, September 3, 2016

frugal survival digest addendum


FRUGAL SURVIVAL DIGEST ADDENDOM

I just noticed that Wal-Mart has $99 shotguns again.  Before, I stated that your cheapest firearm choice was a $199 generic ( well, “starter” might be a better choice as Mossburg puts it out ) shotgun.  You could still get right at about $500 total for the complete plan with this firearm, but it was an effort in skimping.  But I’ve always thought far more highly of a break-open than a pump.  Simplicity, price savings and ammunition conservation.  I know you will all throw up your hands in disgust at the thought of not being unable to strut around weighed down by multiple bandoleers of shot shells, blasting at any noise with a full tube of ammo, terrorizing all who dare question your technological and logistics superiority, but this is called reality survivalism, not Yuppie Scum Prepping.

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Now, to be honest, Wally might have never dropped the single shot at this price.  I just might not have noticed it.  But in either case, there you go.  A cheaper alternative.  A $400 survival plan rather than a $500+ one.  That could make a difference to a lot of folks.  Or, spend the same amount but add to it.  For less than the price of a FLIR, now being excitedly pushed by Rawles while on sale for $599, you could have a year supply of food, a water filter, a firearm and ammunition, lighting and a knife with sharpener, AND the down payment on a junk land lot in the boonies.  Which do you think is better?

END

23 comments:

  1. What brand? Rossi or something else?
    Peace out

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    1. The brand is "Hatfield". Never heard of it, myself.

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    2. I just went and researched it and here's the problems I see. It has a extractor instead of an ejector like the H&R, which would be okay IF the action opened like the H&R (but it doesn't) because you could just polish the chamber and with one hand give it a short backwards pulse to get the empty out while your other hand was occupied with getting the new shell. You can't do that though because the action folds back completely on itself automatically when you open it, not like the H&R which only opens maybe 1/3 of the way. It also has a manual crossbolt safety which is not only unnecessary (the hammer is the safety) but it creates a severe safety hazard of the potential of accidentally bumping it on when you need it in a hurry. Even if you envision only using it for low-stress hunting/foraging, you should also consider that it may be the only thing you have to defend your life during that hunting/foraging mission and when you need a fast followup shot at your attacker (or fleeing game), this won't work. I'm confident with fast followup shots with the H&R because it has a good design, this one is unserviceable in that regard. Also it reportedly has a very heavy trigger and poor quality control with cracks in the wood when new and other fit and finish issues. That's understandable at the price point, but I think you'd be better off scouring the pawn shops for a used H&R, or if you insist on new, a Rossi (even though I don't really care for those either). But besides that, it looks like it's good enough quality that you should be able to get a couple hundred shots out of it.
      Peace out

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    3. I could make some flippant remark about all the issues with a certain poodle shooter five times the price, but I'm feeling magnanimous this morning. I actually appreciate the info-a better decision can now be made by the minions. I won't buy from Wally on guns, but then I still have disposable income. If you have little choice...

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  2. I have a Stevens model 9478 12ga single shot that I got back in 1978 when I was 14 years old, at Gemco (Remember them?) for $50. I have used that gun probably more than any other gun that I have. The single shot shotgun is a fine gun. Put some rifled or sabot slugs in it, and you can take any game in north America with it. Put some upland game loads in it and you can take anything from rabbits to squirrels, to quail with it.

    But, and this is a big but; the 12ga single shot is a light gun, and kicks pretty hard, even fitted with a good recoil pad. Mine will leave a bruise on your shoulder after putting a box of the low velocity loads through it. I recommend a 20ga for most people.

    I was also going to recommend the flintlock musket (As I'm prone to do here often in the comments section) as a forever gun. A long gun when fired with a round ball for taking big game, a shotgun for taking small game, and the most primitive, but still practical, forever ignition system that you can find in a gun. The biggest problem is that the friggin things cost a grand now! But if you can find a deal on one, I'd get it.

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    Replies
    1. I think that, all things being equal, the rimfire and the flintlock are no longer good forever guns. I think I'll be doing a booklet on this soon.

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    2. For a forever rimfire substitute, if you can't afford a high end air rifle, consider something like this:

      177 Pellet Rifle to Black Powder Conversion (could be a .22 cal if you want it to be). He actually used the Chinese B1 rifle discussed here before. Around $30 new if I recall.

      Him firing it, 3 minutes.
      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uNdzQHGXr6s

      How to do it, 13 minutes.
      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iZbkuJ8gncc

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    3. Thanks, I'll check it out. I can't see it being flintlock, but...

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    4. I'd say that if you can somehow get your hands on any kind of flintlock cheaply enough for a forever gun James, go for it. I always say musket, because if you don't need to shoot at ranges beyond about 50 yards, they are more versatile because they are also a shotgun.

      For the skilled craftsman, it would not be too difficult to reproduce a musket at home. There is no rifling, and a hardware store steel tube will serve as a barrel for the low pressure black powder propellant. The lock assembly can be purchased at Dixie Gun Works, and possibly Track Of The Wolf as well. A simple board stock can be formed. The flints are long lasting, only occasionally needing to be re-lapped to restore their edge. Buy a couple of dozen or so from Dixie or Track Of The Wolf, or Knapp your own. You might even devise some kind of alternative ignition system to the flint.

      Not the best gun for defense though, unless you have more than one of them pre-loaded. You would probably want to use buckshot to pepper your adversaries with in this case.

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    5. The only good thing about flintlocks going up in price is that the Fergeson reproductions are looking more affordable. Of course, if you can't find out how to make the German super-fine powder, they foul up in about five shots and hence their quick loading advantage is negated. If you CAN duplicate the powder, you can jam through dozens of shots.

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  3. "A $400 survival plan rather than a $500+ one."
    =====================

    Highly doubtful.
    If it comes down to $400 or $500+ the person's finances are such that they will buy neither.
    If a person only has $500 and they really want a firearm, for whatever reason, they will get the cheapest they can and that most likely means a used hand gun at a pawn shop or from someone they know and a cleaning kit and a couple boxes of ammo. I mean, what is the advantage of owning new when finances are so limited?

    Regardless, under no circumstances do I recommend buying a new gun with the obligatory registration in todays criminal society.

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    Replies
    1. Aren't you talking about a handgun which runs far more than $100? Here we discuss the severely financeally challenged needing a collapse kit. Other factors such as gun control are not important, in this instance.

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    2. Been awhile since I've been in a gritty pawn shop so maybe they've upped their game? About 10 years ago I remember seeing rows of used revolvers for less than $100. Didn't really look at the rifles and scatterguns at the time.

      Me? I'd do whatever it took to have a gun that fired multiple shots without reloading. If someone or something needs shot then it may need shot twice and the 2nd shot needs to be faster than the first cause now the shootee is wounded and pissed. lol

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    3. No fancy new auto-loading handgun for $500.

      A used revolver (probably .38sp, not +p capable) can be had for well-under $100. Taurus or worse, but sometimes vintage S&W. Expect that it will be filthy. These are available commonly in worse neighborhoods. After clean-up, fixing, testing, ~$100 in frn's. Not from an FFL, just "a guy" with low overhead who sometimes sells stuff.

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  4. A Hatfield shotgun is an import from Turkey! I think. Yugli Arms or something like that. I would want you to buy it, shoot it 100 times, and if the barrel didn't mushroom and blow up in your face I might consider the purchase. I got a single shot H & R I've had over 20 years. It was cheap at the time and still shoots good.

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    Replies
    1. If all you afford is $99, you don't need to shoot it 100 times. Just once, to liberate a better gun.

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    2. HA!
      Now why didn't I think of that. Good one!

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    3. You can do that with a bar of soap in a sweat sock!

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    4. The Hatfield appears to be a Yildiz design. We've owned a pair of .410s in that design - good good those are, no experience with these Hatfields. The folding design is great for concealing inside a rucksack.

      The reason why Wal-Mart is selling so cheaply is they are planning on getting rid of firearms, likely to sell no more. Some good deals if can be found - good luck to all the players !! :^)

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    5. If Wally is getting rid of all guns-like it did semi's-why not just sell to another chain? If the single shots were in a national ad circular, wouldn't they have enough to just get rid of in bulk?

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  5. ATTENTION!!!ATTENTION!!!! Incredible. Rush down to Kroger NOW this very day and stock up on shortening. I don’t know if it is a sale or the new everyday price. But a tub is only $1.79!!!!!!!! No other grocery comes close to being so low in price, especially not Wally. In a nice thick plastic tub ( although the top is a bit flimsy ). You need fat in your post-collapse diet and even if shortening isn’t that good for you, being without is worse. Do NOT plan on burning your body fat to supplement your diet. Go! GO NOW!!!!! Old price, close to $3. Still the best bargain around. But at the new price, you buy NOW! Even if you only use it for barter. ( this will be posted Monday for those that don't read the comments )

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  6. You might be surprised at the gun brands made in turkey. Jim I dont think the gun grabbers will have single shot shotguns to high on the list either. Yes it beats the hell out of a sharp stick and can serve most purposed well except combat. I have an H+R 20 gauge I got as a kid. I still stock a bit of ammo for.

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    Replies
    1. You can use this in combat-if you are an insurgent. I wonder if Turkey is the new Brasil for affordable guns.

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