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Monday, September 12, 2016

the forever gun book 1


THE FOREVER GUN BOOK

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Note: I’ll be posting this as I did other, older books.  A few chapters at a time rather than continuously.  I don’t want too many minions to get bored and wander away and forget to come back. 

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THE FOREVER GUN BOOK

INTRODUCTION

“The Forever Gun” is a concept whose origin is lost in time.  I’m not sure if I coined the phrase or a minion did.  Or if I saw it elsewhere and forgot about it, my subconscious attempting to take credit.  It isn’t rocket science, regardless.  Smokeless powder is such a superior form of firearm, and firearms themselves such a superior weapon compared to others, that the longer you can retain use of that weapon system the better off you will be.  Originally, an ideal Forever Gun was a rimfire rifle ( with, ideally, an accompanying pistol ) with ten thousand rounds of ammunition.  At the time I purchased mine I spent $99 for the rifle and $175 in ammunition for a grand total of $300 ( with the added federal purchase license or background check or whatever they call it ) give or take.  This was not a mystical time lost in antiquity ( where ice cream cones and candy bars of enormous proportions were a nickel and movies cost a quarter ) but rather in the last ten years just prior to the housing bubble bursting.

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A rimfire is of course far from an adequate survival rifle and was not chosen for its stopping power or compactness or lack of recoil or anything else.  It was, simply, chosen for its insanely low price.  For barely more than one weeks minimum wage, you could be relatively sure of being armed the rest of your life with a smokeless powder weapon.  It was the suckiest of all weapons-true.  A rimfire might be wicked good at eventually killing everyone shot by one in the absence of modern medical care and antibiotics, but it wasn’t very good at distracting your enemy enough so that he didn’t shoot back at you.  However, and this was a BIG “however”, if all your enemies were armed with bows and arrows or smoothbore muskets with abysmal accuracy, the rimfire would start to have a lot going for it.

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Now, before your little pea brain starts churning and pumping out a hundred and one better “forever guns”, let me just stop you right there.  I am NOT in the business of pimping out hideously expensive survival solutions.  My business always has been and always will be Frugal Survivalism.  Tappon and Clayton and Ruff and Rawles are all busy compiling lists of The Very, Very Bestest And Mostest Super Deluxe Survival Gear.  I simply will not in my wildest dreams believe that more than 1-10% of potential preppers can afford such recommendations ( and, no, Virginia, the average wage earner taking thirty years to compile the necessities is no longer feasible.  Things are bad out there, you CANNOT time the collapse, just because one thing happened in the past doesn’t mean it can happen again, and for the love of God, 99% of all conventional prepping advice is for the benefit of the companies selling the devices, not the consumers themselves ).

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Wait, you say, a #10 can of freeze dried testicles will last thirty years.  A big bad mighty and righteous AR-15 will smite all my enemies.  Spending the most is getting the best and that helps me survive and I am worth it.  Maybe so, Junior.  But ponder this.  I am completely and totally in love with myself, and I have no problem believing that frugal preps are sufficient to keep me alive.  Your thirty year shelf live freeze dried food cannot compare to my three HUNDRED year shelf life wheat kernel and the cost of my food is much lower.  It is probably more nutritious.  And my old beat up war surplus bolt action will be going long after your AR has one of its Space Age plastic/specialty metal parts break.  Not to mention mine will not run out of ammunition as fast.  Your defense against a Frugal Stockpile is, “I’m worth the extra” and “the one with the most savings at the Apocalypse does not win”.  To which I reply, “You have Very Little of the Very Best.  I have a Lot More Of Better Than Nothing Equipment”.  Want to bet who lives longer-the one with six months of balanced nutritional meals or the six years of adequate calories?

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Everything you do in survival preparations must be within your budget.  And I’ll be frank-a Forever Gun is most likely no longer within many of your financial means.  I present the concept as a good idea and an interesting one.  If you can afford it, all the better.  But many cannot, even at my bare bones recommendations.  What I will NOT recommend is the Top Tier choices, as the average survivalist is going to have enough issues affording the least costly as it is.  Nothing chaps my ass rougher than all these gun mags drooling themselves to dehydration over impossibly expensive equipment.  $2k pistols and $900 scopes.  When 9 out of 10 periodicals do this review after review, issue after issue, is it any wonder I’ve ceased subscribing to most of them?  And I can afford it-hell, it’s a business expense.  But they can take their less than balanced never unbiased always toadying up views, roll them into a small tube, and stick it where the sun don’t shine.  I will NOT be THAT guy.  Most of us are poor, many more of us are getting that way, and soon all of us will be gazing about in uncomprehending befuddlement at the smoldering ashes of this economy.  Affordable and frugal gear MATTERS.  We need to do more with less and quickly.  Engaging in a circle jerk of fantasy wish fulfillment over dream arsenals is counter-productive.  And intellectually lazy.

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17 comments:

  1. buy it cheap, stock it deep - food, water, medicine, shelter, heating, clothes, ammo and firearms.
    If you cant afford to feed it don't own it.
    This goes for pets, livestock, firearms, vehicles, or children.
    If you have some of the above that you wont be able to feed in a total economic collapse (no job and little to no social safety net) now is the time to begin divesting yourself of it in some manner that is either morally or financially advantageous. Children can be trained to help provide for themselves to some extent (ID'ing and collecting edible plants, standing watch, getting jobs, etc.) Pets and livestock can be trained to guard, or pull a plow, or whatever to the best of their nature and training. What can your vehicle do for you without insurance license or fuel - especially if it is just waiting to be repo'd.
    And a fancy firearm that cost thousands? with only a couple dozen rounds of ammo? what can you use it for post economic crash? Ammo, Ammo, Ammo. have only a few firearms and lots and lots of ammo and they will remain valuable to you.

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    1. Women and children can also be used for bait in traps. Have several of each in case there is a learning curve.

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  2. "Your thirty year shelf live freeze dried food cannot compare to my three HUNDRED year shelf life wheat kernel and the cost of my food is much lower."

    Not to mention.. you can plant a portion of yours and make even MORE food! yes it takes hard work and time, but try growing additional food from an MRE :)

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    1. Hint, hint, buy the book on small scale organic grain growing seen here to the right.

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  3. Once again, good points. Stocked up on those .22 a long time ago. However, I do have a few reach out and touch someone weapons and blow a hole big enough to throw a dog through calibers. Acquired second hand, years ago, and paid for. It's not even an EBR, but a "sport" rifle. If I was starting from scratch I would not have bothered. It is nice to have something that can break the chest of someone wearing an armored vest from shock alone.

    Kinda owe the dog for good service. Best alarm and bear chaser I ever had. Not bad for a 30 pound rescue mutt. Keeping her fed is a priority.

    I don't even read Rawles anymore. Years ago it fine to read as the situation was dire. Things are getting too real for me right now to fill my head with his ideas.

    Kinda hard to justify the expense for that style of prep. What seems to happen is that someone will focus on just one thing, guns or maybe freeze dried foods. If the emergency does not turn out to fit their narrow range of prep, they are boned.

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    1. As we talked about before, Yuppies think they are boned without money and luxury, so the lack of preps works to their advantage killing them off and putting them out of their misery. Of course this has to be subconscious as they belong to the Christain Militia and suicide is frowned upon.

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  4. I'm going out on a limb here because you already said you'd rather have a 9mm carbine (Hi Point?), but I just wanted to give a range report for...

    http://www.gunadapters.com/12-gauge-to-9mm-pathfinder-series/

    It's also on sale right now, don't know for how long. Also, I believe you said previously you're now leaning towards 9mm for a forever gun.

    Gun used was a H&R with an oversized, high-vis bead sight (I think it covers about 12" at 100 yards). Although the H&R has a vigorous ejector, the weight of the adapter and the O-rings keep it securely in the (polished) chamber of the H&R and don't slow down or add an extra step to the reload process. Nobody makes 9mm buttstock shell holders for 9mm that I know of, so my speed loading technique is to use a 9mm magazine for the reload. You can keep the magazine in a quick-access pocket, pull it out with your left hand, and slide a round into the chamber. If you want to keep it in your mouth (faster reload maybe?) I'd probably go with a thin single-stack magazine like from Kahr. I'd also consider some textured grip tape to keep it from sliding against your teeth and so you don't have to use as much pressure to hold it. Anyhow, I only used Winchester "white box" 9mm 115 grain fmj while standing, unsupported, no sling, at 100 yards. (The literature sent with the package recommends Remington UMC 115 grain jhp, which actually expands reliably). I was aiming at a rock and it seemed to get about a 6" group (smaller than what the bead sight covered). I want to try it at 200 and 300 yards but I haven't had the opportunity yet. There was no discernible recoil and no difficulty with extraction of the empties (quick fingernail pluck). I was wearing hearing protection, but the muzzle blast was unnoticeable and the noise seemed to be about half that of the same round from a pistol. Maybe this would be a good backup to your primary 9mm long gun. At a minimum, it's impossible to "spray and pray" so your 9mm supply would potentially last much longer.
    Peace out

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    1. Definitely an idea I will use-thank you very much.

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  5. As for myself, I recommend the BIC approach, such as in BIC lighters and BIC pens. They're good for the job, inexpensive and you can afford to lose one (and they're hard to break). Similarly, my carry knife is an Opinel for the same reasons (costs about 8 €), the Mora knife is in the same vein.

    Regarding firearms, it seems the Hi-Point C9 ( http://www.alloutdoor.com/2016/07/25/hi-point-c9-pistol/ ) is such a weapon. It does the job (well enough it seems) at a price of 150 $ (one-third of a Glock).

    I chuckled when on a forum I read the testimony of a guy who took this Hi-Point everywhere, and leave his "superior" costly pistols at home.
    I screamed internally WELL SELL THEM INSTEAD ! And get some more backup Hi-Points for the money.

    I do agree with Lord Bison Of Immaculate Hair views on the evils of semi-autos, but on the other hand for somebody who is short on money AND time, and thus cannot afford to learn fire conservation techniques, a semi-auto pistol might be golden for the first few nasty encounters on the die-off phase.

    $200 (pistol+ammo) and you're good to go on the firearms aspect.

    (PS I don't hold stock of that company - but it seems they're successful)

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    1. Luckily, I moved so many times in my life prior to settling down here in '08 that the BIC Approach is a natural for me and has saved me grief also ( they say three moves equals a fire in destructiveness to your possessions ).

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    2. PS-I might steal the BIC Approach concept.

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  6. Pretty-good 10x-fixed range-finding-reticle $200 glass makes shooting more effective (imho, not fussing with zoom) than glorious peep-sight for old eyes. so far, this one seems to be okay http://www.midwayusa.com/product/353744/bushnell-elite-tactical-rifle-scope-10x-40mm-mil-dot-reticle-matte. 1" (not 30mm) diameter has variety of mounts available. There is a different one with 1/10th mil clicks instead of 1/4mil clicks (so what?). Bright and sharp in this price range. If it works for a while it'll keep working.

    I was briefly interested in the .30 conversion that used .223 brass, but Uncle Sam isn't interested (how can he be, what with the domestic shale Ponzi collapse?). Cheap and compatible is most important, not how well it works with suppressors.

    .22lr's were cheap once, and I bought them. Ruger MKII pistol with heavy-barrel is a heck of a contest shooter with expensive or selected ammo, but not much of a defense weapon. 10-22 is plain practical, if the user is. A 10/22 TakeDown with a folding stock fits in your backpack easy. During the recent .22 ammo drought, I got some great deals on .22's from owners who couldn't afford to blow away a box of 500 in a few hours any more and lost interest in favor of (cheap ammo) air rifles. Self-control is important with a self-loader like 10-22, as is the low-capacity (but high-reliability) 10-round flush-mount magazines. Ammo is back (not cheap, but available) and the good-deal weapons are still okay.

    9x19mm is sometimes $0.13 each while .22lr is $0.06, and nine includes a reloadable brass case along with "stopping power" if better bullets are fired from a carbine. Nine is the "sweet spot" in a handgun, esp. models that work when you have impaired fine motor skills (big/clunky like G17, Browning HP, or M9) and default to low-grade repetition training. Current commonality/low-cost means lots of ability to stockpile (reloading supplies & breakage parts) as well as likely sourceablity via Free Market in tough(er) times.

    I miss $95 cases of 5000 twenny-too's, but also $125/cases of IMI 7.62x51 M80 (delivered), and $1.09 premium 0% alcohol gasoline. None are coming back, nor are jobs that pay 10 gallons of Diesel fuel per hour for unskilled folks.

    Don't worry, there are "smart devices" to entertain/inform/distract/track you. Be happy! Intentionally collapse faster than the economy and keep warm/fed.

    pdxr13

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    1. I missed the sweet spot for prepping. I was making $25k when gold was $300, silver $5, Enfields $60, gas $1, Oklahoma farm lot on grid $6k. And the ex took almost all of that income. To think what I could have done.

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  7. Not listening - nah nah nah nah - rimfires rule foevah !!

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    1. :) If you buy TWO cases of rimfire, we throw in a chainsaw for free!

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    2. Rimfires are great until you run out of factory ammo. Stack 'em deep, enough ammo and cleaning supplies to shoot all of your barrels smooth. That is enough.
      Same deal with chainsaws: you need enough fuel and 2-stroke oil and files and extra chains and kevlar chaps to cut down all the trees within 2 miles of your bunker. Then, you have enough.

      Got a security patrol for the Arborists making "I have gasoline, and you don't got none...na na na na!" noises? Bow saw only makes a little noise until the short crack/crunch, while building strong arms.

      Sixty dollar Enfields! $80 hand-pick of five, or $150 "accurized" by some UK wartime shop. Don't forget $90 1200-round cases of hardened steel core AP .303 with brass boxer cases, designed to knock down armored horses at 1200 yards. ;-) Never again will the PTB allow military grade firearms of any era to be available cheaply and uncontrolled to an angry population of enthusiastic shooters.

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    3. That is why AR's are so widespread and affordable-they pose little threat to any beyond poodles.

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