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Thursday, June 9, 2016

nary a drop to drink 2 of 3


NARY A DROP TO DRINK 2

For the American West as a whole, you have a giant desert.  One area has sufficient rainfall, and then you have the coast up from San Francisco.  All others between that strip and to the Continental Divide-again, more often than not, the exceptions proving the rule- are not suitable for farming except for mass energy infrastructure dams and their irrigation or deep well pumping.  You can rule out the Federal dam structures, many past their prime and subject to failures due to budgetary constraints ( down stream from a dam?  Don’t be ), at least long term.  And wells?  You can put more into drilling one than buying a house, but you have no control over new neighbors moving in and sucking off the same aquifer.  You might run out of water before the mortgage is paid ( ask the Texas farmers and ranchers ).  More importantly, aside from the debt and money issue, is long term viability.  You want to live through the Apocalypse with the nearest non-well water source hundreds of miles away?  I can see a relatively shallow well, with few neighbors and few prospects of future growth, in addition to a manual draw system, but I can’t recommend no other source of water.

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If you are contemplating moving to the desert, I think your number one rule is, do NOT rely on a well for your primary water source.  Surface water and rain catchment only.  If you don’t wish to live like a savage, and the wife insists on more than a three gallon a day water allotment, it is cheap as hell to just haul water, dump it in a tank and pump it with 12v.  If you are driving to work anyway.  To me, $60 a foot well drilling is a complete waste of money ( granted, your area might be $40 as most companies in my area are suckling at the gold mine’s teat and can’t be bothered dropping the price for mere civilians, but even a 100 foot well at that lower price is ten times the cost of a plastic tank for your truck, AND one for your home [if freezing is an issue, just bury the sucker and cover with insulation] ).  After the electric outages deny you town water, you have your back-up catchment and your nearby surface water.

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At one time I had a lot in northern Arizona, bought at some ridiculously cheap price like $300.  It was my first lot, if I’m not mistaken, and it was my homelessness insurance.  But it certainly wasn’t my retreat location.  The closest surface water was not only seasonal, it was twenty miles away.  If you feel safe doing that on rain water alone, more power to you.  I didn’t.  Which is really a shame as directly moving there would have saved me much toil and treasure.  Not that I’m unhappy at my present location.  If I had moved to Arizona I think I’d be having several nervous breakdowns there, the place is outpacing most of the rest of the West besides California for ecological/overpopulation collapse.  My point is that ideally you want a home near water, as skimpy as it may be, as long as it is year round.  Food is far easier to hoard and do without an immediate second source than water is.  But you don’t need an insane amount of that water, either.  Five or six gallons a day, if watched carefully and utilized intelligently, is enough for hot weather hydration, cooking, dishwashing, bathing and clothes washing.  If you have transport or food animals, you’ll need surface water, period.  Rain catchment is for immediate isolation while waiting for the die-off to complete itself ( it won’t be long-the entire globe is oil dependent and transports nearly all its food great distances-a recipe for widespread quick collapse ).  Horses or even just goats need more water than you can catch, so don’t plan on a well for them, or raising them with alternate energy.  They are for after the die-off.  If you have them now, and use a well, it isn’t an impossible situation ( except perhaps financially ), but you had better have a back-up source of water they can rely on.

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On rain catchment, if you live in a monkey molesting overly socialist People Paradise that bans it, such as Oregon or Colorado, I would suggest telling them to bite your ass and move out post haste.  If you are in a well watered area, it isn’t a huge deal.  If you are in the desert section, it is only your life they are screwing with.  Oh, but hey, our little buddy The Northern Idahoan Survivalist Guru likes such locations as Oregon, with all its Hippies and communists ( don’t get me wrong, I have little love for Capitalists, but at least with Mammon Worshipers I can throw down a bit of silver and scurry away.  With communists, they are never satisfied unless you can honestly prove to them you are happy they are screwing you.  It is a matter of degree of fear and hate on my part ).  Don’t misunderstand me, I’m happy he doesn’t like Nevada-I have more than enough neighbors and don’t need any Yuppie Scum Survivalists moving into these parts.  But, really?  Oregon and Washington?  The dry parts and those downwind of massive nuclear waste collections?  Those are preferred lifestyle choices?  In what insane universe?  Are there already enough survivalists in northern Idaho and he prefers the poor riff-raff proletariat masses to relocate to the crappy parts in other states?

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Anyway, the desert is fine for you and me, po’ boys.  We don’t expect a retreat to have woods and streams and concrete bunkers and farm fields.  You know who else had all those except the bunkers?  Confederate civilians.  All those locations fared poorly when Sherman went marching ( Grant, proving that anyone on a piece of Federal currency except the ones favored by free market drug dealers is a centralist punk, used the homely analogy to describe his strategy as “I’ll hold down the cat and Sherman will skin it” ).  Just saying.  The desert looks mighty inviting when it isn’t targeted by centralist agriculturalist empires.  Tomorrow, lets wrap it up with feeding yourself without much water.

END

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10 comments:

  1. Elko minion here James, and totally agree about digging a well. Upon hearing that I sold my CA property, both my mother and my brother insisted that the wisest thing to do is to immediately dig a well on my Elko property. Not going to happen, and will never even consider it. First off, the cost of a well will be about 5 times the cost of what I paid for the property. Second off, such a venture will eat up all of the proceeds from the previous property, leaving me nothing for preps. I was actually quite appalled at the silliness of such a suggestion. The cheap water tank hauled by a truck, or a cistern sounds just fine to me at a 1/10 the cost of a well.

    In other non-related news, here in the People's Republic of Kalifornia, the smoking age has just been raised to 21. I'm kind of laughing my ass off over this because of all of those under 21 smokers, many of whom support the nanny state political system, because that's what it ultimately gets you!

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    1. 21 to smoke? Un-friggin-believable. Next up, NYC size sodas.

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  2. Great post. Be sure your rainwater collection is off a metal roof. Asphalt shingles leach all kinds of nasty into the water. Ideally your water will be filtered during the transition from the gutter to the tank. If you allow the water unfiltered into the tank and filter afterwards, the bottom of the tank will fill with sediment, leaves, etc. The sediment will be hard on the valves when opening/closing. You'll still need to refilter or boil before drinking though. The food-grade plastic farm tanks (black or green) only have about a 10-year life span when exposed to UV rays. The solution is to shelter the tank in a building, under a roof, or stucco the tank. The stucco will protect the tank against welding sparks/fire, minor accidental impacts, and stray shots from a BB/pellet gun. How much water can you collect? Here's the formula. Take the square footage of the roof (viewed straight down from the sky), divide by 1000, multiply by 550 to determine the amount of gallons collected per inch of rain, then multiply by your average annual rainfall. For example, your collection surface is 320 square feet, and your average annual rainfall is 10 inches. 320/1000=.32 .32x550=176 176x10=1760 gallons of water per year.
    Peace out

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    1. Just did the math, about 9 gallons per day avg. Not good enough. I need something else. Something like a....pond!

      I built my 24'x36' building (workshop-office) 10 years ago. It has trusses, 6/12 pitch, 12" overhang, and a 5-V silver metal roof, white alum. fascia and ventilated soffit. A month ago I installed vinyl gutters and downspouts as my first step toward water reclamation.

      The building is surrounded by very tall oak and hickory trees and right now one or both are dropping clumps of vegetation on the roof that discolors it demonstrably. Right now 1/3 of the roof is seriously discolored to a light to dark brown. This will wear off as the year goes on but the vegetation, which is immense, gathers in the gutters and clogs the downpouts. I'm researching screening to put on the gutters. But the screening will get clogged with the vegetation and I will need to use a ladder to clean it off. I'm wondering if this vegetation would be easier to collect farther down the line some how, before it gets to the collection tank. I want to get and keep the rainwater as clean as possible BEFORE it gets to the tank and hopefully lengthen the duration of the filtration system.

      Good points about protecting the tank from UV. I'm wanting to get a 600 gal model and now that you've made me aware, I may build a small shed (8'x8') to house the tank, pump(s), etc.

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    2. Hmm, I've never heard of a system to protect the roof-not a bad idea. Stay off ladders if possible to avoid injury. Is it practical to extend the roof closer to the ground? More collection space, no need for a ladder. Sink the tank. Just spitballing.

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    3. Hey Ghostsniper. Nightshift here I'm on my phone and don't have my google log in. Anyway if your roof is galvanized you don't want to drink the water. Painted roof only. Galvanized puts bad chemicals in the water. I don't remember where I read that but I was researching rain catchment.

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  3. Asphalt shingles aren't ideal, but not as bad as most people describe. The rainwater runs off them- they don't sit and soak in the stuff. The main thing picked up from the asphalt shingles is carbon, which means you should not try to purify with bleach, which does create toxic stuff. My main catchment is off of a metal roof, but a small shed with asphalt shingles for some extra catchment is not a big deal.

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    Replies
    1. And shingles is what most roofs have, for when you relocate or take over abandoned buildings.

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  4. If you were moving to the glorious cold desert of N.American Mongolia, a welded-seam stainless steel roof would be a multi-generational water collection surface as well keeping the sky off of your stuff. The European INOX company has a tethered machine the size of a collie that crawls up the raised seam of the roof panels and continuously welds them. On a simple roof shape, probably not excessive cost, as long as you buy the ss material during a commodity depression. If your seams were far enough apart and the pitch correct, you could mount solar panels up there, too. The cost may be similar to a tile roof (several times the cost of 3-tab and proper prep/finish).

    Read Dune for radical water conservation ideas.

    pdxr13

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    1. I'm assuming 3-tab are the asphalt shingles? Anything is actually cheaper than those, accounting for their low life expectancy and needed replacement. Isn't there other options, like a metal shingle? I've never roofed, other than my plastic and dirt.

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