Thursday, February 15, 2018

poodle shooting 3 of 3


POODLE SHOOTING 3

Talking about emotional decision making, I’ll freely admit that this has led my arsenal choices.  I shall forever fear and hate the AR, regardless.  I understand I had an older well used A1 model and they more easily jammed.  But the thing was always spotless and STILL had issues.  I simply cannot forgive that kind of performance ( it is my life we are talking about, after all ).  This was imprinted on my brain under stress and logic doesn’t change that.  I don’t claim I’ll never use one again-you never know how the coming guerrilla war is going to go.  I just won’t like it.

*

Hollywood and fear of the AR cemented my love for the 45, but admittedly the pistol has many problems and there are much better choices ( imprinting on the 357 revolver was done in a period of severe stress financially, where selling the 45’s were a positive and keeping the frugal shooter, the ammo sipper, was preferable ).  Being attracted to the SKS was pure Hollywood inspired emotionalism and the ChiCom versions proved to be rancid turds that even a $99 price tag couldn’t polish up.

*

How did I imprint on the Enfield?  Simply, the recoil ( which I wasn’t used to, just getting out of the military using gas operated weapons with little to no recoil ) knocked the scope into my eyebrow and took a chunk of flesh.  After handling the poodle shooter, this kind of power tightened my sphincter!  And that was it-one shot, one bloody but non-dangerous wound later and I’m hooked on Enfields for life ( and although I have the tools as needed, I don’t know if I’ll be able to scope one again.  Just because you know the trauma that changed your programming doesn’t mean you can change back.  I know the road rash near run over accident that took my bike riding speed from 15 to 9 mph, but I still can’t ride a bike fast anymore.  The same way I don’t know if I want to take the chance of using a scope on an Enfield again ).

*

So, I can talk for days and days and tens of thousands of words about how wonderful the Lee-Enfield is.  And I have.  To my mind, THE best apocalypse rifle to have.  I can cite studies and figures.  And I have.  Yet, how much of that is just my emotional imprint with the weapon and how much is actual logic and analysis?  I submit to you that it is one of the hardest things in the world to separate the two.  If you are emotionally invested in religion, there is no logic to eradicate that belief.  It just IS.  If you are emotionally attracted to Gore Warming, everyone else are ignorant barbarians trying to kill you ( even as you drive around soiling your own nest ).

*

The M-16/AR became as popular as it did for purely emotional reasons.  No logic can possibly explain why it was a decent or even good weapon to begin with.  Notice I said, “to begin with”.  It had SOME fabulous features, granted.  But it had far more flaws that no amount of rifle barreling or ammunition powder tinkering was going to change.  Yet, as soon as it became popular and then became the standard, THEN just its popularity alone improved the weapon.  You can cite all kinds of facts to me about how mistaken I am and how wonderful the gun was and is, but that is because you are emotionally responding to your gun choice.

*

You take your facts and prove logically how valid your emotional response is.  Yet, if you had chosen another weapon you would do the same with that.  THAT is my point.  We rationalize our emotions.  That is simply a human trait.  I’m not asking anyone to try to change that, just simply accept it.  You think your AR is perfect because you are emotionally invested in it.  Which, AGAIN damnit!, is not a bad thing.  Emotion is our version of life saving instincts.  All I ask is you don’t ignore the bad as you embrace the good.

*

The AR fouls its own nest.  I’m not attempting to claim you need to go to another form of self loader.  The AR platform should be used as designed.  That no recoil feature, and the simplified action, are very good things.  What you need to do to minimize the fouling gases is to use it intelligently.  Which means, don’t use it as a submachinegun or a squad automatic weapon.  Use it as a marksmens weapon ( not as a sniper.  Don’t flatter yourself ).  Even if you don’t agree with me that turning it into a bolt gun is a good idea, don’t use the system as a rapid fire weapon.

*

I won’t get into the whole problem with semi-autos again.  I just focus here on the use of rapid fire rather than semi-auto actions.  The AR will deliver problems to you in the field, eventually, if you use it with rapid fire.  It is a GREAT weapon as far as accuracy.  The lack of anticipation of recoil will really help your marksmenship.  Just stop thinking of that feature as an excuse to keep firing blindly.  The round sucks.  You can’t get around that.  You are really just using a rimfire that will actually penetrate skin at 300 ( or 600 ) yards.  This is okay.  At 300 yards, you can merely wound rather than incapacitate, then have plenty of time to flee.  Just don’t give the round more credit than it deserves.

*

I will never give up my Enfield’s unless forced to my advanced age and becoming crippled.  But I cannot recommend anyone follow my example of an arsenal if they are just starting out.  The supply finally giving out, the rifles sell for insane amounts I would never pay for a beat up used gun.  New?  Sure.  They don’t offer them new.  You are out of luck.  If you are starting out, I wouldn’t even recommend an SKS, as tempting as they are. 

*

Certainly not an AK, as superior as they are in their specifically designed roles ( a shorter range high volume carbine that will not stop firing, with an effective round.  The 7.62x39 was actually designed first, over several years, and THEN the weapon.  I submit to you that the guys designing it feared Stalin’s wrath if they screwed up.  The idiots who decided to change it were probably the same ones who liked the idea of invading Afghanistan.  Who the CRAP ever thinks invading Afghanistan is a good idea?  Oh, wait…).

*

Just hold your nose, sell a little piece of your soul to the devil who is holding the corporate dingus suckers from Colt, and just give in to the new standard militia weapon that ‘Murica has adopted, for a little better but mostly worse.  May Baby Jesus have mercy on us all.

END ( today's related link http://amzn.to/2H4b1ei )
 
Please support Bison by buying through the Amazon ad graphics at the top of the page. ***You can make donations or book purchases through PayPal ( www.paypal.me/jimd303 )
*** Unless you are in extreme poverty, spend a buck a month here, by the above donation methods or buy a book. If you don't do Kindle, send me a buck and I'll e-mail it to you in a PDF file.  If you donated, you may request books no charge.   My e-mail is: jimd303@reagan.com  My address is: James M Dakin, 181 W Bullion Rd #12, Elko NV 89801-4184
*** Pay your author-no one works for free.  I’m nice enough to publish for barely above Mere Book Money, so do your part.*** junk land under a grand *  Lord Bison* my bio & biblio*   my web site is www.bisonprepper.com *** Wal-Mart wheat***Amazon Author Page
* By the by, all my writing is copyrighted. For the obtuse out there
 

42 comments:

  1. Good series Jim. You are not wrong in your gun choices as made in the circumstances at the time, it is still solid and will hold up a long time still. Consider a afgani tribe member can screw with a super power with last century bolt guns is proof. Just stick with what you "know". The guns, ammo, (and food) is one part. The brain, mindset,training-practice of the individual is the absolute other necessary part by far. Lack of reslove,hesitation,squeemish tummy has no place in collapse-shtf. Listen to Jim, not the gun fag websites,magazines,tacticool kids at gun shows,etc.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yeh, bitches! Listen to ME. I'm kidding. I know you don't. Got junk land? How many years of wheat grain?

      Delete
  2. Your reasons for not wanting an AR , resemble my same dislikes of that weapon. This being the prime reason for choosing the mini 14, it having a much cleaner cycling method. Ruger guarantees no firing pin problems with normal fire and no steel cases used.
    Rate of fire is an over hyped term. Rate of hits ignored.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The only bad thing on the Mini is they are 50% more and have no spare parts widely available. But of course, you can now say the same thing about the Enfield :)

      Delete
    2. When I had a Mini-14 firing Norinco brand ammo the bolt would seize up with brass(and have to be disassembled). That was pre 1996 & the rifle I had was first gen

      Delete
    3. Naw , mine is the heavier barreled newer version.
      Also with upgrades naturally lol.
      I consider it to be only a git out of Dodge weapon.
      Got .30 call stuff for later.

      Delete
    4. Plus I figure when they ban them here soon, I'll just sell it for a huge profit and buy two good bolt guns with the proceeds...

      Delete
    5. I don't know if it should be a consideration, but the asswhores pretty much out of the blue banning private sales here in NV came as a bit of a surprise. Beware of the strategy of the semi as an investment if your state might follow.

      Delete
  3. You MUST see the C&R series about the Lee-Enfield.
    Long Lees : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P-stGi5PlV8
    SMLE : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hl51NVkt6Sg

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Excellent-I'll be watching the second one while biking today. Thank you.

      Delete
  4. I have three brand new ARs sitting in my gun cabinet, along with a LN MP-15/22 and a LN DDI AK.

    And I'm selling them all.

    I can say that due to my further research and watching and who knows how many videos, and the decades of shooting these weapons, I've come to the realization that they are the worst weapons to have for a survivalist. Along with other various military style semi rifles, shotguns and auto handguns.

    No matter what, and if you get actually training it makes it worst, you will blow through ammo like water. You will always have in your mind that if you miss your target there's another round with a pull of a trigger.

    So, you pull and again and again.

    Don't believe me? Go watch any YouTube that's put out by any training company and watch how much they blast out at a stock still target, let alone a moving target.

    And I caught myself getting caught up in the "Buy better parts and make your weapon better" scam. But it isn't really a scam. The scam is that the weapon you buy is like one from the 80's and that MagPul never existed. Yes, you can get a weapon with Magpul, but you are getting charged for it.

    And mags.How many?

    Most people say 10 or 12 should do. I have yet to see someone stop there. More like dozens upon dozens and a few mag drums too. Look at the D-60, the stupid things holds 60 rds (2- 30rd Pmags that cost $21) and it sells for around a hundred.

    Then you need slings, first it was a single point sling, then a two point, now a three point. And it has to be a Blue Force that costs $100. But you can customize it for even more$$$.

    Then mounts, scopes, NV scopes, web gear, better ammo, lights, cases and on and on. A never ending money trap, because you can always do just a little more to make it "better".

    At one time I had over 80 military rifles, shotguns, and handguns, even semi-SMG types that are now PPCs. Hundreds of mags, and a real live ammo fort.

    Now, I'm down to a few because I no longer can AFFORD to keep them in ammo. Heck, I can afford to even go through a mixed case anymore to keep my skills up.

    Now, I going back to single action revolvers and lever guns and you know, actually hit my target with one round instead of thirty.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Damn, I was scared off of semi-auto mags just from ONE weapon, the 45. I had to have two, of course, and the magazine bill, on my frugal budget, was too much. I can't imagine your arsenal. All very good points-thank you.

      Delete
    2. Good comment

      No semi-auto was foisted upon me by government decree. Sometimes the government accidently makes decisions that actually benefit the average shmoe.

      I love watching the American gun video's and reading all the militia porn. However I'm always scratching my head about how they pay for it all.

      All I see when they mag dump is an entire days disposable income, then they reload and I'm thinking "hang on tiger, you've gotta buy food and you're already blown 20% of this weeks pay".

      So I'm thankful I don't have access to all the great tactical gear.

      Delete
    3. You should see them blow a weeks pay at the shopping mall, or go through 10% of a $100 tire peeling out, or a gallon of gas speeding, or instead of five minutes work with a snow shovel dumping a quarter bag of ice melt down on the ground. Going to Wal-Mart for more clothes because the load of laundry is too big to be bothered with. Throwing away half of a $5 burger. I could go on and on.

      Delete
  5. in other news : The nuclear attack on the UK that never happened
    http://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-29804446

    Excerpt :

    Hogg suggested psychopaths would be "very good in crises" as "they have no feelings for others, nor moral code, and tend to be very intelligent and logical".

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. In old news, I just got done watching the entire 1:40 video on the SMLE. I can't believe I was captivated the whole time with Enfield Manufacturing Porn. The first hour was the quickest hour on my exercise bike to date. I might need mental help.

      Delete
    2. The whole channel is awesome. Finest gun porn I've ever seen, the intellectual level is very pleasing.

      I'd recommend to watch the videos from the first one, because technical information just piles up from there. (be sure to watch the "Long Lees" episode, it was made for you :)

      If you bike while you do it, you'll be in excellent shape :)

      Delete
    3. I'll watch the first vid tomorrow. He made it very interesting. Compare to most "boring droners" ( especially the financial guys ).

      Delete
  6. Lee Enfield...
    I'm assuming when you got the scope injury, you were shooting prone? If I recall correctly, the Lee Enfield came in three different buttstock lengths, for shooters with different lengths of pull, but most of them were the shorter stock lengths? Perhaps a slip-on recoil pad is in order, but then you'd lose your effectiveness of a buttstroke with the steel buttplate. Also, since your plan is to go mobile, perhaps you should have some .303 stashed at various locations about the desert you intend to wander through, since the likelihood of collecting .303 off of somebody who unsuccessfully attacked you is approximately 0%.

    Mini-14...
    All the spare parts you need are right here...
    https://www.midwayusa.com/s?targetLocation=%2F_%2FN-11652%3FNo%3D0%26Np%3D2%26Nr%3DAND%2528p_visible%253A1%252Ccustomertypeid%253A1%2529%26Nrpp%3D96%26Ns%3Dp_metric_sales_velocity%257C1%26Ntpc%3D1%26Ntpr%3D1&userItemsPerPage=48&persistedItemsPerPage=96
    For the firing pin, they must be fitted at the factory. Remove your still good firing pin from your bolt, mail the bolt to Ruger without the firing pin, and they'll insert a new one (you pay) and return it to you.

    .45 Colt article author...
    One thing I forgot to mention, is that because wadcutters are set so deep in the case compared to other bullet designs, the light powder charge is compressed more. You get more consistent ignition and more consistent velocities which helps with accuracy. They now started doing it (extra deep bullet seating) with .38 Special self-defense rounds.
    https://www.midwayusa.com/product/524684/federal-premium-personal-defense-micro-ammunition-38-special-p-130-grain-hydra-shok-jacketed-hollow-point-box-of-20
    The neat thing about these, in addition to the greater consistency, is the ammunition is more compact. Say, hypothetically, you carried .38 Special as your primary CCW, or as your backup gun. In your get home bag, or walkabout bag, you should carry resupply. The actual box is too bulky, fragile, and not weatherproof. I use what I call "bullet bottles." Nalgene industrial HDPE bottles are basically impact and weather proof. Here's what I use (4 ounce wide mouth) as a bare minimum, except this listing is too expensive...
    https://www.amazon.com/125ml-Nalgene-Pass-Port-Shipping-Bottle/dp/B00HW0R2EI/ref=sr_1_3?s=industrial&ie=UTF8&qid=1518727735&sr=1-3&keywords=nalgene+industrial+bottles+4+ounce
    This one would be better for carrying the much bulkier .45 Colt...
    https://www.amazon.com/250ml-Nalgene-LDPE-Mouth-Bottle/dp/B00HW0ZFE2/ref=sr_1_1?s=industrial&ie=UTF8&qid=1518728157&sr=1-1&keywords=nalgene+industrial+bottles+8+ounce

    Peace out

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Spare parts as in post-apoc scavenging. Possible with the AR, impossible with the Enfield or Mini.

      Delete
  7. Sorry for the lousy overpriced link for the bullet bottles. Here's where I got mine...
    https://www.rei.com/product/402055/nalgene-polyethylene-bottle-4-fl-oz

    https://www.rei.com/product/402054/nalgene-polyethylene-bottle-8-fl-oz
    Peace out

    ReplyDelete
  8. Knowing in advance the ar15 limitations will still allow you to be effective. Most minions will just need to cover their driveway and front yard, not do light infantry assaults. Also as Jim referenced the commonality will allow scavenging for parts, mags, ammo. Like glock 9mm, it has its shortcomings but it's everywhere-ness is an advantage in of itself. Think in terms of common 'merican pick-up trucks for parts, not a fruity euro-nippon suv cause they look yuppy. Plan accordingly.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I simply cannot fathom the price of pick-ups. What they sell for used now was a used mobile home on its own land twenty years ago.

      Delete
    2. The problem is thinking your going to defend your home.

      People need to face the fact that their house has no ballistic protection at all. Modern houses cannot stop an arrow from a compound pow from punching through. let alone 9MM. A old block/brick house won't slow down even a 5.56 round.

      Rounds coming through the walls of a house can start fires. I've seen a vacuum cleaner catch fire from being used as a target.

      And your biggest worry won't be parts, it will be ammo as you had to leave it all behind.

      Delete
    3. Speaking of emotional attatchments-that is what your house is. No value outside rain protection and a trap for central heat/air, all the value is illusionary. The rounds punching through will just be your last view of your Bankers Hovel. True on the left stockpile-I think a problem for just about everyone.

      Delete
    4. To support EasyCompany's post, here is a link to a classic webpage, for those who don't know it yet

      https://www.theboxotruth.com/the-box-o-truth-1-the-original-box-o-truth/

      A former shooting instructor investigates the truth or lies in common shooting/gun lore.

      Delete
    5. Unless you have a pre positioned, stocked, turn key retreat-bunker that is accessible, your home or domicile may be it. I am not a wealthy blog writer with a mcbunker, so if I am stuck in place with a puppy shooter or two and come what may, so be it.

      Delete
    6. That's because almost no one is willing to cache most of their supplies.

      So much info is out now that it is almost foolproof, if you don't cheap out.

      But then you can't glorify your treasure if it's buried where you can't see it, fondle it or show it off.

      Delete
    7. Ave-I hadn't heard of that site, thank you.
      1037-not a bad philosophy, as long as it isn't an excuse to do too stupid of things like live in a too large urban area.
      EC-and to be fair, a bit of it is having it out of your control.

      Delete
  9. I’m one of these freaks that actually likes single action revolvers, particularly the 1873 clones (For what a real Colt costs, I could probably buy a homestead, and have money left over). The problem that I do see with them is that if you needed a quick follow up shot or two, it’s a little harder to pull that off with a single action. And it’s unrealistic to think that I could ever come close to pulling off what the chap in the video below can do. For that reason, I’m hoping to get a Ruger LCR double action in .38 Special someday.

    Initially my thoughts were that if the police use semi-autos, then they must be fairly reliable. But the police rarely ever enter into a situation in which there is not a dozen of them with all guns trained on one unarmed, wheelchair bound, paraplegic shoplifter, so I decided against that logic.

    Shooting 5 Targets Under 1 Second - Cisko Master Gunfighter

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9JjIHj3zqbY&feature=youtu.be

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Wait. Can a paraplegic reach for the items on the shelf? Or did he just bump the shelf with his chair and take what fell off into his lap? :)

      Delete
    2. I wonder how long that Cisko guy practiced before he could achieve that speed and accuracy. It seems almost unachievable.

      You may want to rethink the .38 Special LCR. The light weight gives it brutal recoil, even with something tame like Winchester White Box 130 grain FMJ. You'd like it a lot better if you got the .357 model and only shot .38 in it. Also, the lighter weight .38 revolver will be more prone to having the bullets walk forward out of their cases during recoil. It's possible to have a poorly-crimped fifth round in the cylinder walk completely out of the case and be loose in the cylinder. If you get the .38 anyways because you prioritize the lighter weight, it'll probably be a shoot for familiarization only, then dry fire for practice. You can also take whatever factory round you decide to use and give it an extra crimp with your reloading dies to make sure the bullet doesn't walk forward during recoil. Not so much an issue with the .357 model.
      Happy shooting,
      Peace out

      Delete
    3. Yes, he bumped the shelf with his chair, later to be charged with a moving violation. Unfortunately (for the perp) at the moment of impact, a squirt gun falls off the shelf and into his lap, at which point, one of the pigs screams “gun partner!” 6000 rounds, and one moving violation later, “the perp” ends up looking like a piece of swiss cheese, and as he rolls down the aisle, he sounds like a whiffle ball :D

      Delete
  10. @Peace Out; thanks for the additional info. The wadcutter is sounding better and better. In my case, I have no choice but to use pure lead bullets, since that’s what the cap and ball cartridge conversion cylinders all mention that you must use.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I don't know what exact bullet diameter you require, but here's a wadcutter mold you may be able to use.
      https://www.midwayusa.com/product/1010359532/saeco-bullet-mold-453-45-caliber-452-diameter-225-grain-wadcutter
      I like wadcutters with sharp edges. I'm not in your situation, but I would try loading this bullet backwards in the case and run it that way if it flies straight.
      Peace out

      Delete
  11. Ever set up a new scope on a new gun? (This after you've already set up the hard sites.) It is slow and methodical because accuracy counts. You can't do it fast. 25yds, 50yds, 100yds, then 300yds. It takes time, as much as it takes. For me on my new AR and new scope it took about an hour, but that was only up to 100yds. Cold weather and rain has kept me from zeroing at 300yds.

    Use a sandbag at the front and get your sitting position right. Then, after the scope turrets have been zeroed in both directions, you shoulder the gun and position yourself with the scope for comfortable viewing. Paying attention to your breathing the gun will rise and fall. Take a breath in and your body rises causing the end of the barrel to drop. Pay attention to where the cross hairs are on the target. Let all the air out and the gun barrel will rise, again pay attention to where the cross hairs are on the target. You will eventually squeeze the trigger when your air is out and the cross hairs are in the proper place on the target. This is crucial. I'm giving an abbreviated version here as there are lots of little things to pay attention to that I am not mentioning.

    The overall point I'm making is that accurate shooting at distance is not accomplished by acting like almost everything I have ever seen in TV shows and in the movies. Even in the army they did not teach accurate shooting. You have to learn it on your own from people that know what they are talking about.

    This is the way I shoot almost every bullet I shoot. Slow and methodical, by the rules. The point is to put the bullet where you want it and this cannot be done in any other way. While my AR is capable of shooting as fast as I pull the trigger, what is the point of doing that? Shooting that way will not get the bullets on target no matter how long you practice it. Rarely do I shoot faster than say 3 to 5 seconds between shots.

    We (my neighbors property) have 4 steel plates set up about 8' apart and at various heights and we do try to shoot all 4, down and back (8 shots) fast sometimes. There are other fast move maneuvers that we practice too, from behind trees, over logs, left handed, in the dark, etc. But the goal is always first and foremost to hit the frikkin target and slow and methodical is the only method that works.

    So my AR can indeed send a lot of lead downrange 90% of the time I shoot it much like I would a bolt. Methodically. There is nothing emotional about this, just plain logic. One last thing. Hanging with people that think emotionally will make you that way. I see em at the professional range all the time. They are usually there on the weekends. I only go there during mid-week when most of the show offs are suckin boss ass.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. My point on "thinking logically" was that our conclusions are usually emotionally based. I understand what you are saying about avoiding the usual idiots. But are we a LOT better? I contend that for whatever one or two things we get right, most everything else is illogical. For instance, all the "pros" at the range. What kind of car are they driving? Is it practical transportation or a bit too much status symbol or luxury? Is their wife someone they love or more of a trophy wife? Do they enjoy their job or is it just to earn extra money ( that is being TOO logical when they should apply more emotion to the equation ). Are they going out to lunch after firing, spending a weeks worth of grocery money on one meal? No one acts 100% rational all the time. He would be an insufferable prick no one likes. Just as no one realizes how little logic they use and how emotional they are about most everything.

      Delete
  12. People who SELL weapons thought invading Afghanistan was a good idea....

    ReplyDelete
  13. @Peace Out. Yes, the idea behind the LCR was weight. I had looked at the .357 and saw that it was around 4oz heavier, so that’s why I was thinking the .38 special. Weight is an issue for me, and I could just see myself leaving a heavier gun behind as a result. I initially thought about the .22lr, but since it’s primarily going to be a defensive weapon, I’d rather throw a little bigger chunk of lead at my adversary. In either event, you provided some food for thought, so thanks.

    With regards to the Cisko dude, I agree; almost seems impossible. I personally wouldn’t even try it, because I feel that it takes borderline super human abilities to pull it off, not to mention, more ammo to practice with than I could ever afford. If you think about it, such shooting would have never been possible (at least not for very long) with the old Colts, with their weaker flat springs. All of these modern quick draw dudes use Rugers.

    For the .45 Colt ammo, I suppose as long as the bullet diameter is the proper size for the .45 Colt, it should work. The cartridge conversion cylinder only requires that you use all lead bullets without jackets, and cowboy velocities.

    ReplyDelete

COMMENTS HAVE BEEN CLOSED