Tuesday, March 24, 2015

consuming to invest 8


CONSUMING TO INVEST 8

Wool Clothing

Most folks hate wool.  I can’t imagine why.  I mean, man-made materials are so much better at keeping you warm even if they are bulkier, rip easily and as a bonus burst into flame turning you into a screaming running matchhead if you get too close to any fire.  Okay, perhaps that last point is a bit exaggerated.  Perhaps today’s fabrics, blended, are less of a fire danger.  Less is still some, though, isn’t it?  I prefer to stick primarily with wool with an outer cotton shell as a windbreak.  Cotton doesn’t keep you warm, however.  That was the whole point in wearing it, why England took off financially.  In warm, warmer and warmist climates, cotton is king.  But away from the jungle, in cold climes-you know, mostly away from the rest of all those oxygen wasting asshats-you need wool.  It always cracks me up when you see all those helpless urban Yankees in a severe winter ( who could have seen it coming? Oh, and for the benefit of foreign readers, Yankees are NOT Americans, they are the inhabitants of the northeastern part of the country-kindly don’t insult the rest of us ), shivering in twelve layers of cotton clothing.  Try some wool, dumbass.  If wool makes you itch, or if you don’t want to clean it as often, you wear a layer of cotton, THEN wool.  Just like you wear a T-shirt under a dress shirt.  Not rocket science people.  Wool is warmer than you can imagine, it is still effective even with a hole or three in it ( which are easily mended ), or when damp, and it is renewable.  Sheep give you a new batch every year, and sheep don’t eat off of the same land as humans ( okay, they CAN, given a centralized mechanical operation, but they are designed to eat grass which humans can’t digest ), unlike cotton which competes with farmland. 

*

If you can’t find wool in your local thrift store ( I have plenty, of the ugly Christmas variety-I don’t mind, after a certain point, looking silly if I’m warm.  I work outside most of my shift, and I’ll happily waddle around in a bulky stupid patterned sweater with a huge rabbit fur Commie Cap on my head, invigorated at ten degrees below zero [ that’s Fahrenheit, you metric using socialists ], unlike all the Yuppie Swine skittering about in clothing far less warm ), try Sportsman’s Guide.  You can usually get wool sweaters for about $15-$20, the same for thicker wool pants ( search under “military wool pants” as those are surplus items ) and their pea coats and great coats in wool, if those are your choice, vary in price but I’ve seem them as low as $30-$40.  So, wool not only saves you money because it lasts longer ( the keeping warmer part is non-financial, but priceless ), but if we all finally heed Carter’s advice-granted, thirty five years late- and wear a frigging sweater inside so we can turn down the thermostat, there is a nice savings for you also.

*

CONSUMING TO INVEST 9

Wool Blankets

Some of my fonder memories when I lived in the mountains as a child, besides all the exploring in the wilderness, was sleeping.  We all had down comforters and there was no heat at night, with a window usually cracked.  When you are warm, sucking in cold air is invigorating.  It is also healthier.  Okay, not extremely frigid air, but merely cold.  Luckily, today, there is China ( they do come in handy for half our stuff, even if the other half makes us vulnerable ) and they churn out very decently priced synthetic down filled comforters.  Now, being a kid back then, I was a little snot nosed oven, generating much of my own needed heat.  Now that I’m a heck of a lot older, I tend to get a bit colder on my own.  So I have two or three wool blankets underneath the comforter ( as it warms up at Spring, I slowly shed each blanket until I just need the comforter-then in Summer I only need a sheet, and then we slowly build back up come Fall ).  Wool blankets are NOT cheap.  And don’t buy the cheap ones as they are too thin or they cover less space, or are not 100% wool.  You are going to have to invest heavily in them.  I’d suggest at least $100 worth which will get you four or five of them ( what?  You don’t believe in stockpiling extra?  By the way, I’ve heard wood ash makes a great moth repellant ).  That is twice as much as a comforter, but in the great scheme of things very affordable.  From Day One, you are saving money on your heating bill.  I’m not sure how you go about turning off the water so pipes don’t burst without heat overnight in your house( I had it a bit easier with RV living ), but even if all you do is go from 75 down to 55 ( have a timer on the bathroom space heater if you must shower in the morning ) overnight, your heating bill reflects that quite well.  You’ll have saved that investment the first winter, if not the first month, and it is money in your pocket thereafter.  Then, in a grid down situation, you are already set for no heat ( which is why you also have extras, not just because you need to buy now and beat inflation ) as a bonus.

END

Please support Bison by buying through the Amazon ad graphics at the top of the page. You can purchase anything, not just the linked item. Enter Amazon through my item link and then go to whatever other item you desire. As long as you don’t leave Amazon until after the order is placed, I get credit for your purchase.  For those that can’t get the ads because they are blocked by your software, just PayPal me occasionally or buy me something from my Amazon Wish List once a year.
*

The Old Bison Blog on CD 
Over five years of work and nearly two million words of pure brilliance. Here is the link to order:
http://kunaki.com/sales.asp?PID=PX00KX7Z1I                        

Also as a free e-book, but not cleaned up or organized, at Lulu






 my bio & biblio
*
My books on PDF ( ALL free!!  If you like it, most are available for sale in paper versions )  available at
http://www.lulu.com/shop/search.ep?keyWords=james++dakin&sorter=relevance-desc
*
By the by, all my writing is copyrighted. For the obtuse out there.

 

 

29 comments:

  1. We have alpacas. Okay, we have a sheep, too, but that was one of the Darlin' Mans *impulse* acquisitions (the sheep was free at least!).
    Alpaca fleece is warmer than wool and will not make a person itch. It also has a bit of a water repellent nature.
    Learning to weave (whatever the fleece/wool) is one of the best skills you can learn. You'll also have to learn to shear the animal, clean and card the fleece/wool, spin it and then (if one is not available) build a loom or learn to knit/crochet. A lot of labor, but once you have learned those skills, you have a highly valuable skill!
    And alpaca blankets. Go ahead, check and see how much one of those will cost you! Sit down and take some kind of medicine first, though.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. And it feels good to know something besides e-paper shuffling and consuming. No, I won't price one. My system can't cope.

      Delete
    2. Alpaca sweater is wonderful. I have one from Peru and it will keep me warm in blowing rain ~+40F with cotton jeans and t-shirt. Add Goretex shell and milsurp German wool pants over medium ECW polypro and +20F easily.

      pdxr13

      Delete
  2. what u want is boiled wool.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Cotton or Polyester thermals are all I need under cotton 'buisness' casual work clothes to keep me warm for the walk to and from work down to 0F and a wool hat, scarf and socks. I unfortunately find that most of the wool socks are actually 'blends' and seldom keep their full insulative value much past two winters of wear (going flat in toe and heel areas first then wearing though by end of the third winter). I have yet to find any thick 100% wool socks for purchase new (against my feet or 'nads, I will only wear new). But unless I am going to be out in the weather for an extended period or the weather is getting beyond -10F I am warm enough to make it to and from any shelter.
    Part of the trick is staying as acclimated as possible, 65F is a heat wave in my home and 60 is where the thermostat usually rests. Our heat bill is a fraction of our neighbors even though they have a super insulated house of @ the same footage, and our rental place was last updated in the 1960s. We wear sweaters and socks and slippers. They wear shorts and T shirts. Guess who deals with the outside conditions better? Guess who gets sicker more often? Guess who is moving back to NY? (not me)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I prefer the blended socks because of ease of washing. I just wear two pairs as needed. The last pair of 100% I saw was military surplus. Still have those even with a huge 4" hole in one-good for wearing over another.

      Delete
    2. Yes when I need double socks the hole-y ones are usefull as the additional layer. I also find the wool / sheepskin shoe inserts make boots and shoes much warmer (and less smelly) during the winter.

      Delete
  4. Can you give the link for Sportsman's Guide? The site I found doesn't have the cheap prices you state. Also, where do you find wool blankets, 4 or 5 for $100?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. http://www.sportsmansguide.com/productlist?k=wool+blanket
      I don't like the two pounders, too thin. The Swiss one is four pounds-more like it. Check the weight, then compare prices.

      Delete
  5. What is boiled wool? Never heard of it.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I thought they boiled to condition? Not possitive.

      Delete
  6. Hello, my name is Homesteader and I am a wool hoarder.

    Wool shirts, wool blankets, wool clothes. I have totes of the stuff.

    One of my favourite things to do is find free wool clothes that are out of style or have holes. I cut squares out of the good solid pieces (6 inches square) and sew them together for quilts. They are 'chunky' looking so quilting them with yarn and big stitches looks really 'country' and homey. I use a mix of plaids and solid colors.

    I once saw a wool patchwork quilt in a catalog like the ones I make. They wanted over $300 !?!?!? My cost -- a couple of dollars for thread, some quilt batting, and a skein of yarn. (The wool was free and the backing was an old sheet.)

    Because of the natural oil in wool, it has a tendency to repel dirt and stains. Very durable. If it does get a hole, wool is also easy to patch.

    Idaho Homesteader

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi, Homesteader!
      It is amazing what some crafty crap goes for. Well, you can't claim capitalists aren't eternal optimists.

      Delete
  7. Hey James. Wool is good addition to consuming to invest. Slightly embarrassed to admit I'm in Florida and use wool blankets some. I carry a Woolrich Indian looking blanket I thrift stored and use underneath me in my jungle hammock when stealth camping in winter. I find a fair number of high end wool blankets for $6 to $8. Have not done it, but thought repurposing one into a jacket patterned along the line of a fleece jacket would make a great farmer. Another wool investment is high end socks like DarnTough brand out of Vermont. Very long lived, superior comfort and have guarantee if you wear them out. Thanks for the blog, Steve.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Florida would be a great place to buy the Yankee immigrant cast off wool, for sure. Seeing any problems with mouths or the like? I mean, more than usual.

      Delete
    2. Exactly. Lots of retirees from the north donating wool blankets and buying palm tree and shell motif comforters. I haven't noticed any moth problems yet. Some companies such as Faribault out of Minnesota claim some of their blankets are permanently moth-proofed. Not sure how this is achieved.

      Delete
    3. I just buy some ceder shingles that hang in the closet, sold by the clothes hangers. I've heard dryer sheets work but must be replaced regular.

      Delete
  8. 3 years ago the local D.A.V. half way house had a surplus sale.As they were packing up I asked price on 10 army surplus wool blankets they had.20 bucks for all 10 .Also got 2 duffels for 10 and a pair of Douglas army dessert boots for 20.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. With Forever Fracking, you fools with your wool blankets have wasted your money.

      Delete
    2. The Frackers are Fracked. No one will re-finance their junk-debt to drill more $10M holes. At least, not until oil goes to $200 and the Saudi wells are IS-run or on-fire.

      pdxr13

      Delete
  9. Idea for consuming to invest category is food prep and preservation hardware. Some things like grain grinders you have recommended for years. Grain grinders, spare parts, grain rollers for flaking grains( tabletop models available and good for variety when eating grain stockpiles), dehydraters or at least trays and screens for later, fermentation crocks (Harsch is great brand with water seal at rim.) Old style cabbage slicer, the type with wood tray,3 blades. Make fast work when making sourkraut. Butchering gear like gambrels, cleavers & knives, stout pair of game shears. Thanks. Steve in Fla.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I cover dryers in one of the upcoming articles. Good idea on crocking. I'm writing a note now to add it on. Thanks

      Delete
    2. Rawles has already featured a glowing article on a home FREEZE DRYING machine that costs more than all of my cars combined. I'm gonna freeze-dry me some blooburries!

      The other drawbacks are the high-complexity, need for fancy service parts, and need for lots of power to run the freezer and vacuum pumps. Other than that, neat!

      Freeze-dried #10 cans start to seem real reasonable for exotic post-collapse treats.

      pdxr13

      Delete
  10. Thrift stores are the best bargain in town for wool products. I'm not sure about blankets, since I've never searched for them at the thrift stores. But shirts, coats, pants, etc, are all to be found at bargain prices. I got two pairs of wools dress slacks, that were new, and probably cost $100.00 each; my price, $7.00 each. I saw a Pendleton wool shirt for $5.00, and we all know how much their products cost new, but it wasn't in my size. Unfortunately, as with most dress slacks, they are dry clean only. Which, by the way, is why most wool products are not 100% wool, but a wool/nylon blend. For durability, it might be best to get the surplus wool pants. They cost more, but they're thicker, and can be washed.

    Also, don't forget poor man's wool, polyester fleece. Not as insulating as wool, but pretty insulating, and sheds moisture in much the same way as wool.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Isn't polyester flamable? Or was that just overblown like the Pinto exploding?

      Delete
  11. I don't think it bursts into flames, but it can melt to your skin, so that's a negative. Wool is best, but new is very expensive these days. Heck, you can't even get a wool shirt anymore for under $80.00, and if you're a bigger person, it's often hard to find your size at the thrift stores.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I could never find regular slacks that weren't xtra, xtra, supersized. Like, 45-50 waist. Hmm. Perhaps the fat people don't make it to retirement and dead old people clothes make up most of Florida thrift store donations.

      Delete
    2. The Sportsman's guide military surplus is also a great deal James. But it seems like all that they ever have are European sizes, and it's always too small for me (Not fat, but a bigger guy).

      Delete
    3. Stupid Old Worlders. They refuse the goodness of GMO and hence can't achieve supersize ( we used to get there with a meat and dairy, now just a facsimily of )

      Delete

COMMENTS HAVE BEEN CLOSED