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Thursday, April 6, 2017

VBO 2


VILLAGE BUG OUT 2

Now, while I’m certainly not saying it isn’t possible that you can win the home equity lottery, I am saying the odds are very bad any more.  You keep jacking up the price on middle class homes decade after decade, throw in wage destruction through “affordable care acts”, add a sprinkle of housing bubbles bursting, make sure that all your Union jobs are now minimum wage with illegal immigrants working them, send all the jobs to China, not forgetting to include the mandatory bankers greed of course, and out pops a market where almost nothing sells.  Including your home.  Odds are good you can’t find another sucker to take it off your hands.  The bank valuation doesn’t make the added wealth magically appear, but it does goose the property tax up.  So, my question remains, why are you living there?  More importantly, because I understand since 2009 more and more people are frozen with bad choices that are only surmountable if you run away from the rat race, why do you think a poor investment in the Oil Age is going to transform into a good one come the collapse?

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Almost guaranteed,  where you live now is a bad idea.  Come collapse, you’ll have to move anyway.  However, and you’ll probably not forgive me for waylaying you for quit a long trip to get to this point, where you think you should be moving to is probably also a very bad idea.  Junk land is great for staying out of debt and freeing funds for stockpiling.  It might, but probably won’t, even work for laying low to survive the die-off period.  That $300k retreat out in Montana rural way?  If the Yuppie Scum survive occupying it, they will be abandoning it anyway.  Most of our anti-Rat Race and survival retreat properties are too close to civilization.  They might be a vast improvement over Mr. and Mrs. Money Douche Bags property but they are still a dwelling designed with our present civilization in mind.  Not the coming primitive one.  You can’t help that.  You live now as if you must utilize the road system.  Natural barriers and agricultural advantageous spots are irrelevant.  It must conform to the road system.  At one time, the roads did follow most of those of Europe or Asia, old paths that made sense for the old professions and trades, just widened if lucky and paved.  But after World War Two, the nation turned into one large Levittown ( some places, like Los Angeles due to early oil discoveries, made the transition much earlier.  But post WWII was the general nation wide beginning ) and the old paths were no longer followed if they interfered with suburbia ( Kunstler rightly hates the sprawl for killing the culture, but it also killed our ability to devolve back into the old ways in more ways than just that aspect ). 

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That is where you live now.  In sprawl which is still bad no matter how far you are from the city, or out in less densely populated areas but easy to find as you conform to the nationwide layout, AND you are somewhere without regard of natural water source, local food sustainability, natural terrain or weather variables.  Now, obviously, everybody throughout the Agricultural Age lives on a road because nobody can survive without trade ( the three abnormal behaviors forced on us by agriculture: government, religion and trade ).  Being on a road isn’t as much of a death sentence as being wired to the grid ( I’d follow the lines, not just the roads-but I’d especially follow the paved roads rather than the dirt ones if I was following the wealth ), but as bad as both those are, the practice of individualizing dwellings without factoring in anything other than grid availability is where you’ll see issues.  Living with just the family unit is natural.  A single family shelter is the rule.  But once you fail to cluster that house with others, in a village, and built it strategically, you are hosed.

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Terrain is much more important than factoring in your road grade or the number of bridges you need.  It certainly limits us today, compared to centuries past, because now settlements are built around rail and road and those follow placement rulings.  In the past, a donkey trail was enough for placing a village and that come after food growing.  Now, even food growing is dependent on other factors such as combine accessibility.  Not where nature allows the best harvest.  It is just like when I tell you that you don’t need a car and you all look at me like I just ate a baby and was passing a flying monkey.  From your point of view, your natural habitat the road system, everyone needs a car to get around.  I find a dwelling closest to my job and never travel past bicycle distance from those two locations.  You have no frame of reference for that because it is just normal that everyone drives.

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Except after the apocalypse ( I don’t care what all the Yuppie Scum Survivalists with their underground gasoline tanks of five thousand treated gallons say ).  Then you find your location built around your abnormal lust for internal combustion engines, a lust that will one day seem as perverted as fudge packing, pedophilia, zoo animal love or political correctness, is not conducive to post-oil living.  Your “investment” in oil age grid up property?  AAAaaaand it’s gone! ( seriously, have you watched the Southpark YouTube video?  “Southpark and it’s gone” under the search bar and three minutes of side splitting hilarity ensue ).  Chances are good you’ll be relocating to a better location based on defense alone, with food gathering a close second and nothing else much even approaches those two in importance.  Remember, there are phases here for the civilization collapse.  One is minimizing the need for income and maximizing stockpiles.  Two is having a location for the die-off.  Three is finding or founding a defensible village location you can raise food at.  None are probably going to be the same location.  Don’t get hung up on the investment in any one of them, as you will be moving.  Continued tomorrow.

END

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31 comments:

  1. As each of the phases you mention could take days or could take multiple decades, the chances that we will be the generation moving from the retreat fall with every passing year.
    Of course, that is no reason not to have pre-positioned back up caches to move on to after having to bug out of the prime retreat. Picking up a couple more little pieces of junk land to use for those caches are a good investment if you need a place to sink some FRN's.

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    1. Caching being preferred to land ownership. Although, sure, if it is affordable then why not? Not like much of anything is going to hold value. Even silver and gold are multi-generations away after PODA in usefulness.

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  2. Exactly the reasons which we sold our place in Idaho.
    Once the grid was gone and fuel did not exist. We were screwed !
    Sure we lived ten miles from a small town. Had our own well with good water at only forty feet and was prime agricultural ground. Yet it also was only forty miles from Boise and a quarter million people ! Yes we lived in the country , but as you say , on a road and connected to the grid. The golden horde would indeed have found us.
    It is true hat we sold for three times what originally was paid....And could have waited till say 2006 and sold at even three times more....But would we have sold ?
    Pretty much you cannot escape the people factor, they are freaking everywhere. Even Elko has more than you can shoot.

    I kinda like having my moat of swamp between me and the crowd. Them city folk don't like gators and snakes.
    That and you don't have to be concerned about food here. It grows wild all over the place , with a shit ton of wildlife.
    Besides , there's always plan B...Lots of sailboats there for the taking hee hee.

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    1. You are better off with your multiple plans. I have Plan A ( nomadic raiding ) and that is pretty much it, if I make it to that point.

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    2. Currently my plan is that everything is A-OK after 6 months unless my tribe joins me then the plan moves to 1 month.

      Still, at least I have a plan that's longer than "Get something for dinner on your way home because there's nothing in the cupboard" plan that most follow

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    3. Plans are like opinions, we all have one and they usually stink.

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    4. I've read multiple reports of Burmese pythons breeding like crazy and eating EVERYTHING down there in FL. True or exaggerated?
      Peace out

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    5. Pythons? Some but mainly in the swamps. In 40 year I never saw one in civilization. Monitor lizards are another story. Much more aggressive and cunning. They have forward pointing eyes and they look right at you. Unnerving. They are all over suburbania and it's doubtful they'll be eradicated unless the public at large gets into it. See, when the old lady down the road sees one nibbling on her ankle biter she calls 911 and by the time they show up it is gone. Over and over. Whereas if she'd have pulled her heater and laid down a hail of shrapnel that's 1 less Monitor to aggress and breed. I don't see this happening until after a major collapse that wipes out most of the nutless wonders of both genders. Then the Monitors will be running for their lives cause you know, "they taste like Popeye's fried chicken". LOL

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  3. Yeah, we've gone village, not unlike (and down river from) the Druid Dude. BUT - us east coast village folk assumed that passenger trains wouldn't be cut this soon in the crash, and yesterday's '220 Amtrak stations to close' has just complicated life in a lot of villages. It will drive the Yuppie Scum of of our towns, who were using the trains to go into DC to work every day, reduce the current 'tourist trade' in our quaint towns, and speed local housing market collapse. Even the restaurant I cook at will be affected - our weekday evening rush just happens to correlate to the last train of yuppies out of DC.

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    1. I didn't hear anything on Amtrack. We have a stop here. I'll have to research. Thanks ( ps-good luck! )

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    2. I didn't find anything on google, just official regular stuff like timetables. Got a source for me?

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    3. Sorry about the delay in getting back to you. Here's a link http://www.commercialappeal.com/story/money/2017/03/30/memphis-and-220-towns-and-cities-nationwide-could-lose-amtrak/99828262/

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    4. No worries, although I'm slightly offended you don't take full time to be my loyal minion :)

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  4. I believe it has to do with areas that Duh Donald wants to cut the overhead. Far as I know it is only in the suggested realm of cuts , not set in stone yet .

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    1. Ah. Okay thank you. I've actually began to question the effectiveness of Google some time ago.

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  5. PS trade is not artificial, archaeological evidence shows trade that spanned from africa to iceland as much as 10,000 years BC IIRC.
    Trade requires only an equivalent of force, or a guarantor with overwhelming force (like the government at current) and two parties wanting what each other has.
    When there is no equivalence of force or guarantor is when trade falls apart for piracy and banditry instead.
    When everyone has access to the same stuff there is also little to no trade either.
    Global high speed trade like we have now is unusual for is speed and prevalence (everyone owns SOMETHING that came from another continent, and probably got it within a month of its manufacture). Previous eras had trade that took many months and years for goods to get to their final destinations, often at a final cost exponentially more than the originators would get for the item.

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    1. Trade as in no area having all that is needed to survive. Hunter/gatherers in the Stone Age had all they needed. Ag settlements always had a surplus of one thing and not another and trade became necessary. Religion became necessary to control in a centralized government which was necessitated for land control. So, the three weren't needed for survival prior to the AgRev.

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    2. PNW "trade" among massive-surplus and easy-living cultures (almost-free unlimited food as fish/seafood, the only objectively fat N. American natives) was the gifting of valuables on visitors. Fukushima has ended this for at least 200-300 years. The Pacific Ocean may become the New Dead Sea of perfectly-clear water unclouded by any life.

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    3. I'm ambivalent on Gore Warming, but on Fuki I'm all in paranoid. I think you are right. If not in total, in large.

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    4. Anonymous 11:37, Jim of the fine hair -
      Sorry Fuki, won't kill the whole of the pacific, maybe a good sized patch next to the soon to be sea food dependent Japan, and Fuki might give many of the fish people pull from the pacific cancer (and the people that eat them too?) but the fish can handle the radiation better than people, and the radiation mostly will be too dispersed by time and distance to kill much except in the rare odd current that carries too much. Chemical contamination from Bejing, LA, Seattle, etc, is probably a bigger deal, and grid down most of that contamination will decline. The overfishing is the real threat as the peak of oil starts really hitting hard people won't care about WHICH fish they get, much less any stupid paper signed by people from last century saying they shouldn't get enough fish to feed them and their families. So TNT and gill nets, and anything that can be used to pull in the protein will be used even if it means the collapse of the fish population locally or regionally in just a couple years - a fishery collapse that will last generations (of humans) until people quit fishing so much.
      Fuki is no help, but don't overestimate the danger from radiation on a continental or larger scale (no reason to get close to the stuff though).
      Cresson H. Kearny has some good stuff in his writings about how people overestimate the danger and why. (basically because it is unknown and cant be easily detected with our unaided senses it can be scary, and there are people who profit off our fears).

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    5. I don't accept the total doomers on Fuki argument, I just think we are probably not paranoid enough about the danger we accept it as being. The pro-nuke folks have been cheerleading for seventy years about how not-so-bad-for-you it is and I don't buy into that.

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  6. My Kroger has spiral sliced hams for $0.99 a lb. Limit two (at a purchase time) even the card doesn't rat you out at least here in MI. Easy jerky just trim off fat and put into a dehydrator. I like the nesco brand very cheap to buy. I just listened to survival podcast guy on storage. He claimed a dry jar with some uncooked white rice in the bottom add jerky and put a lid on it done! Glad to hear of your new freedom great haired one. Lake Erie Pirate

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    1. I need to read upon that rice deal. Presumably it takes the place of those oxy pads? Thank you, I can't believe the amount of stress I've shed. You don't realize until it's gone. Took me a few weeks to wake up and realize the freedom. Just this week, half way through the day, I understood for the first time that I was actually having a good Monday. If this is what genteel poverty is like, I'll take it!

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    2. Yes what little moisture left is attractive to the rice.LEP

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  7. Yep, nomadic is a long established way of life. The American Indians regularly moved from place to place as they depleted firewood and wildlife. Moving from location to location gave them better options.

    Off grid - no gas transports ? Bikes with trailers ? Wheelbarrows ? I've experimented with some of those game hauling harnesses, they can be rigged to helped pull wheelbarrows up slopes while simultaneously being pushed.

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    1. Don't forget the Chinese wheelbarrows.

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    2. We will probably have enough oil to maintain hard-surface trails 18" wide for Chinese wheelbarrows and bicycles. Pull-outs every half mile (delay of 5 or more vehicles unlawful. Use pullout in 1000'. Rest stop with water.). Just like now, at 1/10th speed (9mph bicycles).

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    3. Great idea, which is probably why it won't happen.

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  8. Are Chinese wheelbarrows some Chi-com solders captured invading the good ol USA ?

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    1. "Chinese Wheelbarrrow" is a 1-wheel cart that uses the width of the operator to maintain stability. Goods are balanced over the wheel (and on the sides) making it easy to pull (especially if blessed with roller bearings, PTFE lube and rubber pnuematic tires) the handle/waist harness. Heavier versions (uphill models?) have a man front and back. This is very cheap cargo transport that can also move a sick or injured person, especially over a narrow but smooth road. If only Burley would make a model that could have an outrigger to go on disused railroad lines! -pdxr13

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    2. Hey, that's a good idea. Find one of those small trucks that have the lowered wheels to go from road to track and use one of them as your rail wheelbarrow.

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