daily ad

Thursday, April 28, 2016

WNTBTTA 9


WHAT NOT TO BRING TO THE APOCALYPSE 9

PART TWO

Before we start this, I’d like to give full credit to a loyal minion for furnishing the list for this second part.  He was envisioning the civilization residue left in the wake of a sudden New Spanish Flu or Solar Flare Event ( or man made EMP working in excess of expectations ).  I’ve assumed this list can be used for most every apocalypse other than Greer’s ( the Druid Dude ) “longest ever straining credibility collapse during Gore Warming and overpopulation and energy shortage which will magically take centuries to unfold”.  The list was for one specific fast die-off event.  It was my doing, not aforementioned minions, to apply it to all likely collapse scenarios.  So if some are “stretches” or strain credibility, it is my fault alone.  I credit said minion, I do not mean to blame him.  It has always been my view ( after sufficient study and years of authority abuse that wiped away my optimism and hope ) that whatever collapse we see, it will NOT be anything other than catastrophic, 99% die-off, complete ass falling out of civilization.  Your mileage my vary, good luck with that.  My view is we are all going to die ( even if trying not to is a worthy goal ).

*

THINGS NOT TO STOCKPILE DUE TO THEIR WIDESPREAD AVAILABILITY

1) kitchenware.  We all preen over our perfectly seasoned cast iron pots and pans and skillets, and they work so much better over a less than evenly controlled wood fire than anything else, but the truth is that cast iron is still a luxury.  It is really nice to have.  I do, and I recommend it ( for civilized on-grid denizens, stainless steel of quality brand works much better with your electric or gas stove.  I’m a convert after using them the last year.  The only trick is to NOT rush the cleaning.  If it has to soak, let it.  Scrubbing is rarely needed, if soaked ) but if funds are tight there are multiple pots and pans in nearly every home.  Sure, most will be toxic crap Teflon coated, most likely not so very coated anymore, giving you the bonus of tasteless flaking pieces of the stuff.  Granted, your Teflon infused organs will soon enough be in someone’s stewpot, so it isn’t like there is a long term health consequence.  For you.  So, there won’t be the kind of pots you prefer, but there will be a myriad of them available for the picking, nonetheless.  If Third World war torn peasants can bake their flatbread on a piece of sheet metal scrap, you can use a busted ass pan from someone else’s kitchen.

*

Same with plates and cups and mugs and silverware.  I’m just as guilty as the next cheese dingus, multiples stockpiling every kitchen dish as if  I would never see another one, ever.  I can’t imagine I thought I could ever sell flatware for a pretty penny ( most likely stainless steel won’t be smelted ).  Perhaps I was just going under the assumption that collapse, no collapse, no matter what I had everything I needed without leaving home.  But it does seem silly, now.  Who doesn’t have a half a kitchen drawer full of flatware and other tools?  Who doesn’t have too many cups or glasses?

2) building materials are usually recommended to the average prepper.  Why?  Suburbia is going to be chock full of abandoned houses that, if not demolished and salvaged, will rot and melt down and blow away.  Plenty of two by fours, nails, plywood, roofing, insulation and other materials.  Since the key to survival is going to be downsizing shelter ( less heat ) and burrowing at least partially underground, with drastically reduced population, and smaller shelters replacing conventional size homes, there should be plenty of houses available to everyone to salvage.  I’d recommend an odd roll or two of heavy plastic sheeting, but at $60 each you might have to also forego that purchase.  It is invaluable for underground housing, but you could also improvise roofing as underground waterproofing, after a fashion.  

*

Of course the preference is having exactly the needed materials on hand, ready to go.  You might have a tough time both demolishing buildings, transporting the material easily, AND avoiding the die-off in progress if there are time constraints such as an approaching winter.  However, while wishing for prepper perfection in one hand, unnoticed in the other hand there is appearing a giant pile of reality.  You can’t always budget for everything you need.  Hell, I’d wager NOBODY can prep as prescribed.  It is a huge jumble of hopes and dreams and budgetary constraints.  If building materials are not in the budget, salvaging will have to suffice.  Just get the basics you can’t improvise on.  Which should be few.  Continued tomorrow and for who knows how much longer.

END

Please support Bison by buying through the Amazon ad graphics at the top of the page.  IF YOU DON’T SEE THE AD, DISABLE AD BLOCK ( go to the Ad Blocker while on my page and scroll down the menu to “disable this site” ). You can purchase anything, not just the linked item. Enter Amazon through my item link and then go to whatever other item you desire. As long as you don’t leave Amazon until after the order is placed, I get credit for your purchase.  For those that can’t get the ads because they are blocked by your software, just PayPal me occasionally or buy me something from my Amazon Wish List once a year.  Pay your author-no one works for free.  I’m nice enough to publish for mere Book Money, so do your part.*** 
*Contact Information*  Links To Other Blogs *  Land In Elko*  Lord Bison* my bio & biblio*   my web site is www.bisonprepper.com
*Link To All My Published Books
* By the by, all my writing is copyrighted. For the obtuse out there

27 comments:

  1. Some building materials just5 to build or patch up while waiting for the die-off to wind down would be useful - you don't want to go into a zombie infested town to spend hours tearing apart a house with hand power while waiting for one of the evil undead to show up behind you... But you shouldn't have to stockpile more than you would need to build a minimal shed/bedroom.
    Pots and pans, sewing needles, spices, etc. were in fact trade goods in the last dark age. But I agree again there are enough of them out there now that they are not going valuable trade goods during and immediately post die-off. Have enough to cover your immediate needs for a couple of years, and trash pick or scavenge or trade for what you need post die-off.
    Spices especially will be replaced with locally grown herbs in most cases - garlic, onion, lemon grass, mesquite, etc. Only salt, tea and pepper are worth stockpiling for post die off dark ages - personal use mostly, not trade.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Without burning witches, we'll keep the herbal knowledge which will replace what used to be imported.

      Delete
    2. You can buy and grow tea trees. I did some google research and found a company that sells what you need. If your climate is to harsh they do well in a green house.

      Delete
    3. (Pots and pans, sewing needles, spices, etc. were in fact trade goods in the last dark age. )

      That was before the industrial revolution powered by inexpensive oil and gasoline.

      The next dark ages (just around the corner?) this stuff will be laying all about as we have been making the junk for 100+years and have limited value from it's abundance.


      Chuck Findlay

      Delete
    4. How much from the last 100 years? Or will most of it be from the last twenty? The junkier junk. Its utility will be degraded.

      Delete
    5. - AnonymousApril 28, 2016 at 5:28 PM
      Yep, that's what I was saying, during our lives and probably our kids too, there is so much of that little durable household good/tools around that if there is any sort of die off the cost of getting more will not increase enough for it to be worth your while to stockpile more than you use on an annual basis.
      No-one is going to corner the market on sewing needles or pans for the first couple generations after the die off/crash even if it one as slow as ArchDruid dude thinks it will be...

      Delete
  2. On the bright side, my teflon coated organs won't stick to the pot the MZBs are cooking them in. even if it is not "well Seasoned" ironware...
    :)
    -eviltwin

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That is what I like about you-besides being a funny MF'er-you care about other people!

      Delete
    2. Lolololololololol !!!!

      Idaho Homesteader

      Delete
  3. Right up your ally James.

    100 Budget Friendly Items for the Frugal Prepper


    http://www.backdoorsurvival.com/100-budget-friendly-items-for-the-frugal-prepper/

    Chuck Findlay

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I don't even have to check that out. Seen the site before and less than impressed. But thanks ( I'm assuming there was no sarcasm intent-:) )

      Delete
    2. No sarcasm intended, I looked at the site and while I thought of most of it, I thought I would share it. We all are on a budget (at least I am) and any idea to save a few $$$ is worth looking at...


      Chuck Findlay

      Delete
    3. I see your name and I get skittish :) I'm mostly kidding-please continue sharing links. I mostly am oblivious to alternate sources aside from the dozen sites I can stand wading through.

      Delete
  4. Hardware of any kind will be easy to find PADA. Like POWER TOOLs better to buy solar panels to run /charge them. Consumables for trade is cheap compared to a lot of items that will litter every house abandoned.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Shouldn't you stay away from rechargeable tools due to battery failure?

      Delete
    2. I agree James. Battery powered tools have a short life span. Great for now but give me 110volt a/c powered for durability. Those battery packs don't last. If you want to power them off solar though you will need a decent inverter. My electric chainsaw, A Works brand draws 4 or 5 amps or up to 5,000 watts but it is a beast.

      Delete
    3. True but if you find them, better to take cordless tools for salvage work and leave the panels guarded in camp. Nightshift your saw is 15 amp 1800 watt max allowed by UL labs.

      Delete
    4. James battery powered tools save money as they allow you to do more work without the power cord being dragged around, needing to be hooked up, needing to be put away.

      But there are good and bad power tools as far as the power you get out of the batteries.

      Drills, jig saws, small panel Circular Saws are good as they are good at using the power for the work done.


      Bad battery powered tools are Saws-Alls, Circular Saws, Chain Saws as all these do a lot of heavy cutting and suck down a battery fast. They are OK for a mild (homeowner) use, but for a trade man they are just not worth it.

      Also low quality tools (as far as brand) tend to have low quality batteries or older generation batteries as older tech is less expensive then cutting edge tech. My Milwaukee batteries are (I think) third generation and deliver a lot of power to keep you working. And they have a 3-year warrantee. More expensive tools allow for better quality parts (including batteries) that last longer and give you years of life. Low-end stuff, not so much…

      And as far as batteries every power tool needs spares to do work while one is on the charger. Spare batteries are expensive, my Milwaukee M-12 tools use 12-volt batteries that cost $80.00 each, but they outlast moat other batteries from lesser brands. Last Friday I put up 14 8-foot fence panels. (over 100-ft of fence) on one battery driving in a LOT of 4-inch screws, the battery was still 1/2 charged according to the meter on the drill. A Black & Decker impact driver would have crapped out at 3 or 4 panels because 4-inch screws take a lot of power to drive home.

      I also have a 4,000 Watt inverter in my van and can use it to top off batteries between jobs, but really don’t use this much as I top them off at jobs as needed.

      And before you tell me that Harbor Tools battery tools (actually Harbor Tools anything) are good and you can just buy more of them when they go bad, and they DO GO BAD a lot. That doesn’t work for a professional as time and labor is a major factor in work and pricing of work. And running to replace a junk tool all the time burns up valuable time and also makes you look bad to a customer. This may be OK for a guy working on a weekend project, but a tradesman or a farmer needing things done wants it done now without all the time and aggravation of having to stop and go buy another low quality tool.

      I tend to see battery powered Saws-Alls and Chain Saws that customers own (almost always a lower quality tool like B&D) and they NEVER are able to do much work for a few reasons. First is they are low quality tools, second Saws-Alls and Chain Saws eat batteries faster then a Hollywood Star snorts a line of cocaine. And second you need to keep on top of charging them and almost no one does this. Batteries are meant to be used (cycled) and letting them sit is bad for them. The newer batteries are better about this, but then low-end tools don’t have the latest gen of batteries.

      Good tools like good anything else saves you money over the long run. But I don’t think you and I will ever agree on this point. I look at it from a different viewpoint then you do. I look at what I need the tool to do and then go find the tool to do (or over do) the job needed. You look at the lowest priced tool first and only.


      Chuck Findlay

      Delete
    5. Gary-good point. If they are just there for the taking...

      Delete
    6. Chuck-you are looking at this from a money MAKING perspective, whereas I am looking at it from a money SPENDING one. Your tools are an investment. Mine are a back-up for emergency insurance that may never be used. You have a short list of tools you buy quality. I have a huge list of tools, so must think of quantity.

      Delete
    7. For any kind of building / construction you really need an “impact Driver” It’s a mini impact wrench made to drive screws. It will drive screws that a regular drill won’t drive more then 1/2 way in. My impact driver is my most used tool.


      For an inexpensive drill you can buy a used drill from a thrift store or garage sale (make sure it’s a 12-volt drill) that is missing the charger or has a bad battery for $5.00 or so. All you do is solder a cigarette lighter plug ($1.00 at just about any Good Will Store) on the terminals on the drill. It is now a 12-volt corded drill. Also you need to make a 12-volt extension cord (again from thrift store parts) so you can use the drill more then 3-feet from the battery.

      It will work with any 12-volt source. A battery charger, auto battery, jump box and any auto can power it.

      Not nearly as nice as a cordless drill (no cord to deal with) but it can bring life back into a dead drill for very little money. And I see DeWalt drills (quality tools) for $5.00 to $10.00 all the time.


      Chuck Findlay

      Delete
    8. Excellent info-thanks. See, frugal and quality can combine.

      Delete
  5. Not my 2L MSR or Snow Peak titanium water-boiling all-purpose pan with lid! It's half the weight of stainless and only 10x as expensive.

    Unlikely scrounge, post-apocalypse. Smelting and forming metal at +3000 degrees F. from Ti bicycles or Soviet subs is going to require some serious inputs.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. But daddy, how could we have used a trillion barrels of oil?
      Well, son, all purpose pots with lids were simply too heavy, and the SUV's needed to go camping with lighter pots were not heavy enough.

      Delete
    2. We put the whole world to work on burning up oil, and it only took 150 years and 9Billion of us to do it! The super-rich & tech-warlords digitized themselves and are recorded in the bunkers, in case we need to speak with homicidal sociopaths from the 20th century.

      Now, we walk everywhere and mine steel bars from the concrete rubble for tent stakes and crossbow bolts. This titanium pot and lid, along with a solar oven is your inheritance. It weighs almost nothing and can't rust so always carry it to the site and guard it.

      Agree with CF about cordless tool battery tech: spend more and get the good stuff like Nano-Lithium, as well as higher voltage systems. If you can't, go corded (low-cost, but useful) and hand tools from 100 years ago. Used cordless tools found almost free with Ni-cd or NiMH may be a good deal if they are complete because they let you do more work fast & remote.

      Delete
    3. Fast and remote might be handy, but it still chaps my ass that what should be a luxury is viewed as a new normal, a necessity.

      Delete
    4. Power tools are only a necessity if folks fail to learn and use manual tools first and well. Giving a 16 year old a new cordless tool kit instead of a box of manual tools (that they will keep for life) sets him up for disposable-tool failure and a lifetime of breaking junk tools and bad work. Just like carrying an FAL or 20mm anti-tank (boltie!) rifle, high-quality heirloom manual tools build care and strength.
      Let the boy make money with the manual tools and spend on cordless-power throwaway tools if it seems worth it to him to have the speed without the cord (manual tools are all cordless and recharge with lunch).
      -pdxr13

      Delete

I must moderate-trust me. You don't want to see what happens otherwise. Sometimes it takes awhile to respond as I only check two or three times a day. No N-Bombs, nothing to get me libeled. Otherwise, have at it. If you criticize me, make sure to praise my hair first.