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Monday, April 18, 2016

WNTBTTA 1


WHAT NOT TO BRING TO THE APOCALYPSE 1

If you’ve heard me once, you’ve heard me a dozen times, poo-pahing all the dearly beloved Yuppie Prepper boy toy gear.  You know, pretty much anything that is advertised on any of present generations King Survival Stud Prepper Guru God website and the dozens that copy it blandly and without much imagination.  Don’t get me wrong, there are good advertisements.  The “forever light” green glow stick ( you can read by them if they are kept at maximum charge.  Leaving it in the sunlight gives you about five minutes of reading.  You must recharge at night-get a high lumen LED flashlight running on AA batteries, with a AA solar recharcher.  When the glow stick dims, you hold the max output light next to the glowstick for a mere five to ten seconds or so and you are good for another five minutes of reading with the stick right on the page under the print line.  I’d recommend building a cardboard and duct tape box to contain the flashlight and stick so you don’t blind yourself operating it this way.  You can wait until the company comes out with a unit that does this for you, a recharge on a timer, but I’d be leery but open as it seems to contain a dozen other features which might make it fragile and/or expensive-the point of all this is to stretch out your batteries to an unprecedented period of time ) is an obvious exception.

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But mostly the highlighted gear are unneeded toys whose companies advertising goes to the survival expects most inclined to agree with them that these items are indeed not only needed but the very act of survival is in grave doubt if aforementioned gear is not owned in triplicate.  Now, I of course mean this in a general sense.  There are no chainsaw companies advertising on survival sites, and this is the most recommended item after a generator.  The “gurus” genuinely believe in their message, even if they all merely absentmindedly parrot the same information handed down from on high from the early ‘70’s on ( and THAT info was a collection of myths and wishful thinking and retail survivalist gear economically directed advice and other less that stellar origins ), and even if survival gear companies are usually devoted hobby members and are only seeking a “all in the family” target audience,  the whole incestuous mess in general and in the long run is not conductive to logic or genuine learning.

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THAT is why I’m so against needless toys.  They are indicative of sloppy thinking and perpetuate stereotypes and lead one into blind alleys and mental traps.  In and of itself, an unnecessary toy is nothing much besides another less than perfect attempt to hurry up and spend our company store chits before worthlessness is brutally imposed upon them.  After a series of them, however, they corrode your thinking ( an object becomes a talisman against hard work ethnic, the hard work of thinking logically and the hard work of intelligently budgeting ) and that is far more tragic than wasting money.  You must go into the Apocalypse with a clear mind, a sharp focus and unfuddled thinking.  Which is another reason I’m opposed to other unsavory practices such as urban living and over-dependence on a motor vehicle.  It isn’t just economics or safety but trying to learn how to use your mind more efficiently.  If you can’t make the sacrifice and move, even if it should be clear as day the most dangerous locations include your own, what other lazy mental habits will sabotage you? 

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If you can’t bike a reasonable distance to replace some of your driving ( yes, yes, I know.  If applicable-if you are clear of crowds, a vehicle is the lesser of evils.  As long as you have local water and supplies.  As far as a job, well, your situation will dictate the comfort level in that.  I say, the lesser addiction is best ), can you do any other exercise when needed?  Bike riding is THE most energy efficient mode of transportation ever.  If you can’t even handle that, good luck on that patrol hiking or even functioning with less sleep and less calories.  And if you can’t do a small change in routine such as that, how about when the ass truly falls out of western civilization?  Ditching your car, for those that can ( there is another lazy habit for you-you can’t even find the difference between your wants and your needs.  Most don’t want to give up their car, even if they could ), would be one of the best things you could do to start illuminating to yourself how easy prepping can be.  True prepping as in minimizing civilization ending dangers, not pretend prepping which is equipment to see you past imagined dangers.  Getting through an earthquake is important enough, but it isn’t even close to surviving an apocalypse.

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Anyway, as much as I’ll keep preaching on true mental conditioning later, for today it is time to wrap things up.  Next I’ll be focusing on a dozen too-hyped tools that are totally unnecessary ( I already told you the first two ).  You’ve heard it all here before, but I trust I have a few new potential disciples out there, and it never hurts to reinforce and repeat  importance lessons.   I also trust some of you will pass this article on to friends so as to spread the word.  Then, as a bonus for putting up with listening to me repeat myself, I’ll add a new category.  Gear that will be so easily available, widespread and not yet close to scarce that it doesn’t make sense for you to waste your money on.  It is like the oft repeated tale of the prepper that had the notion he would corner the post-apocalyptic market for soap, not realizing it was so easy to make with ingredients everyone had it was worse than a pipe dream.  I won’t give you any other hints, as I need you to burn with the fire of a thousand suns in your desire to read this series through.  More tomorrow on your same Bison Channel.

END

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47 comments:

  1. A couple of articles ago, you recommemed "Prepping for Armageddon on a Budget, Book 1".

    If you want to live and not die a slow agonizing death from food poisoning, I would recommend that folks stay away -- no, run away -- from the food preservation advice in that book. I was feeling queasy just reading about how he processed his food. For heaven's sake people, for around $30 (on sale) you can pick up some Mountain House freeze dried yak testicles that will last for 30 years -and- be safe to eat.

    His advice on the screws at the top of the fence was worth thinking about. Though why for the life of me, he didn't leave a small section screw-less so he had a place to climb over and not get injured (twice, he said) is beyond me.

    Regarding your article today -- rope and tarps. These are never advertised on the yuppie survival sites but they are cheap and oh-so-handy to have around.

    Idaho Homesteader

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    1. I have issue with tarps. Crappy quality, high price. I try to avoid at all costs.

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    2. With tarps, you get what you pay for. If the only ones you have ever used are those cheap blue ones, I can see why you don't like them.

      Try this one

      http://www.amazon.com/Super-Heavy-Duty-Brown-Tarp/dp/B005MRQI9S/ref=zg_bs_511396_12

      Remember they are not suppose to last forever but sometimes they are just what you need. This one seems to be the sweet spot between durability and reasonable price.

      Idaho Homesteader

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    3. Right. A roll of visqueen and few hundred feet of sistle rope.

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    4. Sorry, but while the cheap ones might be poor quality-even though, for goodness sakes, it's still ten friggin dollars!-I've had $20 ones not a whole lot better. I use one, of course, but hate the bastards who make them.

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    5. Tarp of really good and expensive: King Kamo by Aqua Quest (10x13', 4 pounds) or even-more-expensive but very-light (~2 pounds)and huge 20x13' silnylon green by Aqua Quest. The price will make blue tarp buyers choke. Snugpak has a 10 x 10' tarp of good quality for ~ $60.
      -pdxr13

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    6. VOMITING BLOOD!!!!!!


      We've had this debate before, quality things cost more.
      Lots of reasons for this, a few being, they are more expensive to make, the company making them needs to charge enough to stay in business.

      I really don't understand why you continue to base all buying decisions on the lowest price and not make the jump to understanding that the lower priced stuff is low quality.

      You may say you know this, but the fact that you keep buying low-dollar stuff and rant about it being junk tells us you don't really understand.

      A $60.00 tarp or $80.00 tarp is not that much for a quality item that will last.

      And who cares what tarps cost back in the day, we are living in the here and now, not the 1980"s.


      Chuck Findlay

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    7. A yuppie prepper can do worse than dropping 3 bills on a good tarp. It's all on credit cardz anyway, so no worries.

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    8. In short, I keep working up from the lowest until I find quality. Highest price does NOT equal best. Why start out there? I usually find good quality at affordable price at twice the cheapest. The stuff that is more is brand name penalty. When a $20 tarp is just as crappy as a $10 one, I feel ripped off because I know someone pocketed that extra $10. Why give then ANOTHER $20 on top of that? I'd sooner buy a few pieces of metal sheeting and do away with the tarp. Did I recommend any of the "half price" Mosin-Nagant bolt guns over Mausers or Enfields? NO! Because they are crap. I don't go strictly by price, but I can do middlin quality inexpensively.

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    9. Tarps: I want to know what is out there at "cost is no object", since I know how awful the very cheapest stuff is. I want to know the length of the field between Jon Corzine and Mother Theresa. I want to pay 10% of the price of the very-best and get most of the quality/features possible, even if I have to get out the awl and sew them on myself to a piece of magical synthetic spiderweb bulk material coated with silicone bathtub sealer thinned out with mineral spirits.
      Here's one on Amazon for ~$30 that is almost as good as Snugpak for $60. B01AXV8VLU click on a sidebar here first, then buy. Blue tarp is too heavy, too loud, not waterproof. Shredded blue tarp can be useful as urban debris camo.
      pdxr13

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    10. My experience with Mosin Nagant M44 and M91 is that they need to be cleaned and cleaned again or they don't work. Yours were probably under-cleaned and still holding storage goo.
      M44 with heavy ball ammo is a flamethrower! Custom load and it's great. M91 is a great bayonet stock with rifle-accessory.
      Mine were not half price, they were less than 1/15th the cost of an FAL. I made money selling them, and made money selling the ammo, even after inflation/handling. Should have bought dozens.

      pdxr13

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    11. My objection has always been the lack of the gas safety bleed. They were needed back then, prior to modern ammo-which applies to future home brewed ammo. Never owned one, myself.

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  2. One of my favorite prepper web things is the lists of what to stock up on "for barter" purposes. A collapse will not be month of chaos followed by 19th century technology at the local flea market. Got 10 years worth of food? If not, you're not ready to think about bartering. Buy food.

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    Replies
    1. Food first and foremost. Most local food infrastructure has been wiped out. Then filters, then ammo. Only then, more guns.

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    2. Water first, then grub, then shelter (don't forget the garments - the first level of shelter), then a means to protect all of it.

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    3. Of course you are right- I was going under the assumption shelter was already there for day-to-day. But then, most folks are tennis shoes and T-shirts in oil controlled climates, aren't they?

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    4. "most folks are tennis shoes and T-shirts in oil controlled climates, aren't they?"
      Yes. Double damn yes.
      My kid walks around in bare feet when it is -40 out, but he is indoors in the house that we keep at @60F, so it isn't a big deal. Our neighbors across the way keep their place at 76F. They pay 4 times the heating bill we do. They wear the same clothes indoors or out only putting on a jacket to go out. tennis shoes t-shirts and slacks/skirts all year round, at least my kid puts on his thermals come fall.

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    5. Your kid can't be all retarded then.

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    6. nope not dumb, just stubborn and acclimated - I hate working in an office for the simple fact that the office next door (that runs the thermostat) likes the temperature to be closer to 80 than to 60 even when it is below 0 out. I think keeping it about 60 works well for being acclimated. But then I choose to wear thermals, long sleeves and wool socks when it is wintertime, so that I don't get frostbite walking the half mile back to the rental house (or if I had to walk the 7 miles to the homestead). But the cubical crones feel it is ok to wear strappy sandal shoes, t-shirts, and knee length skirts as long as they throw on a cheap jacket before running to their remote start SUV's. Bah!

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    7. I get hot as hell about 65 ( above 45 outside in the sun if no wind ). 80 is what I call "old people cold". No circulation geriatric bastards. Whenever some scumbag here mentions they love summer, I suggest they move down to Las Vegas and allow us to enjoy our cold.

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  3. “Most don’t want to give up their car, even if they could”

    Sort of employed minion here James. I'd love to give up my car; in fact I can't afford not to. But unfortunately it will be replaced by a scooter or motorcycle, which means that I can very well get creamed by some idiot in a car. I plan on being on the road only at the off times for most of the traffic.

    Scooter tires are $25 each. Insurance is $20 for 6 months. A brand new engine is $250.00. The economy of ownership is there. Now if I compared that to my car, I paid $400 a year alone in liability insurance, being the same age as yourself and with a good driving record.

    As for the bicycle, it would be nice to be able to get by with one, but the distances that I would have to travel (My Elko land is 15 miles from) are too great, and Lance Armstrong (Before steroids) I'm not.

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    Replies
    1. Seriously think about an electric bike. Front wheel motor on the hub, $200. Three 12v motorcycle batteries in your front basket, wired to 36 volt, charged by 12v solar panels.

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    2. To be honest James, I guess I'm just not that open minded to the electric bike option. I really can't give any totally solid reasons for it, but here are my attempts to justify my choice.

      I wish to have a more extended range. Yes, I could always rent a car if I ever wish to travel beyond my usual short range jaunts, but that's kind of a pain, and too big of an expense. I will be hauling water until I eventually set up a cistern, and I know I can do that on an electric bike, but I'm not sure as of yet how far I will have to venture out to find water? And I would like to haul big when I do, so I planned on having a motorcycle trailer for this purpose. Another issue is that I probably won't have a very serious solar setup. It will probably just be enough to power one of those little notebook PC's, and some LED lights, so when the sun's not shining, I probably won't be going very far with an electric bike.

      I do realise that eventually I will probably be confined to a bike. But as long as the fossil fuels continue to flow, I'd rather take advantage of it while I can. I'm a pussy that way :D

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    3. That's a lot of weight on the steering wheel, I'd consider balancing the load. Put a generator on the back wheel and coast on the downhills and recharge the batts - every little bit helps. (we have lots of steep hills around here, and they kick long ass)

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    4. I'm not talking about the engine that sits atop the wheel, but the new ones built into the wheel. Three small batts balance all the weight-the rider-in the back.

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    5. 341-all valid reasons. Water is around five miles away. And cars are NOT cheap to rent here-the city charges a 20% tax on them. So, $40 a day, plus $35 insurance if you don't have your own, then $15 tax. If you go into town regularly, owning is cheaper than renting.

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    6. “Water is around five miles away”

      I suppose that's a negative in one sense James, but I'm thinking it's a positive for me at this point. I've only had the land for less than a year, and already I've gotten about 6 lowball offers in the mail for it. This makes me slightly nervous because I'd hate to see the area build up. I only have 2.5 acres, not the 20+ that I wanted as a buffer, but hopefully the water situation will work to my benefit, and I won't need the large mass of land. I guess if you're willing to rough it, you can safely eliminate a large percentage of the population ever living within close proximity to you.

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    7. If the power lines are far away, you are safe. The lowball offers are best viewed as junk mail.

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    8. Not sure how far away power is James? But it's the property that's not far away from your hermitage parcel; about 4 or so miles north of Ryndon? So you probably have a better idea on this than I? But even if power were relatively close, I would think that the water issue would put a damper on any excessive building?

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    9. You have MILES without power. Relax. Granted, I only visited ten years ago. But how many could have paid to install line further up?

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    10. Thanks for the heads up James. I am wondering, did you ever find out how to legally acquire water out there? I think it's frowned upon to take it from the lakes and streams? I know that the Rancho Costa Nada dude got it from a park, but if they see you taking a lot of water they might not like that? But of course, the nearest park is probably many miles away?

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    11. The gas station/C-store and RV park are both there at the exit. I figured I'd work something out with them. Or a household if I got to know someone.

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    12. Good to know about the RV park James. They offer two important services; water and waste disposal.

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  4. Ok I second the electric bike (I have one) but we have to agree to disagree on a chainsaw (I have 3). If you took a man from 1600 to 1870s and offered him 1 tool to take back to his home and time he would pick a chainsaw. It replaces so many other tools and saves so much time in work. It also saves calories in reduced work. I have 1 gas and 2 electric chainsaws that work great off a solar inverter setup. A genset isn't in my top 25 but a chainsaw is in the top 10 at #9.

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    Replies
    1. Well, you'll disagree with the upcoming article then. Not that I expect any less-I don't think I can change anyone's mind on chainsaws. Which is fair, as I won't listen to any pro arguments, either. Hopefully there will be enough humor to justify reading/enjoying the post anyway.

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    2. James, my guess is you don't heat with wood. If you did you would have a completely different view on chainsaws. Anyone that processes wood for heat has several chainsaws as they are very handy time-saving tools.

      PS: If you think we are going to have fuel shortages and more expensive fuels in the future you may want to get into wood heat, and the aforementioned chainsaw.


      Chuck Findlay

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    3. Here, wood is $350 a cord, and a long way to go get your own. I planned the future with sagebrush wood, manually cut, and as little of that as possible.

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    4. (Here, wood is $350 a cord.)

      No it isn't if you are modivated and resourceful..

      I heat the garage with only wood and the house with a mix of wood and natural gas.

      In $20-years I have never bought wood and have never ran out of wood.

      When driving down the road I see wood in people's yard every week. When I want wood I stop and ask if they want it, like 89% of the time they say I can have it. I load it up in the truck and take it home. Also I do construction and get a LOT of scraps.

      There is also a place that gives away pallets, as many as you want.

      You can get it for free if you look for it and are willing to do a bit of work.


      Chuck Findlay

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    5. All dependent on driving around. The Oil Age has a termination date. The Fracking Fags have already been proven wrong.

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  5. Can't give up the van, it's full of repair equipment that I make a living with. No bike can carry all of the tools and supplies I use every day.

    as far a processing wood (for heat) a chainsaw is nice to have. I have several electric ones, a manual log splitter, Power miter saw (have at least 3 of them and they process a LOT of wood fast.)

    As far as people buying prepping toys, who cares? It’s their money, they have the right to spend it where they want. We could easily say you have and buy too many books. But being a person that respects others rights to do what they want with their money, you can buy all the books you want and I don’t care at all.


    Chuck Findlay

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    1. Your last paragraph kind of negates my need to publish a blog at all, doesn't it? :)

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    2. I think advice is always good, although it might not be good advice. Advice gets you to think about the subject of the advice and hopefully about the effects of the advice. Your advice is more thought out than most prepper advice out there- most prepper advice goes as far as "it would be nice to have ______" fill in the blank with the toy of the day. Your advice goes, "although it would be nice to have _______, since you are probably financially and time limited, you should instead focus on the most affordable time saving preps of _____, in the place of the toy of the day, if you insist on something like the toy of the day try these lower cost alternatives _________".
      But you approach each toy, and measure and critique on its own merits and costs.

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    3. Yes, it is their money. But if they are buying to help with a societal collapse after consulting with online survival experts, they may be unwittingly making dumb, ineffective choices. Pointing that out does not take away their free will.

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    4. JJ-my loyal minions have led me to making more coherent arguments. I can't take much of the credit myself.

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    5. Noooooooo, with all those books, there's gonna be some decent spin-off ideas.

      pdxr13

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    6. Constantly reading, my subconscious is filled with wonderful article ideas. Teasing them out is the hard part. See, I only read for my minions benefit. My benevolence knows few boundries.

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I must moderate-trust me. You don't want to see what happens otherwise. Sometimes it takes awhile to respond as I only check two or three times a day. No N-Bombs, nothing to get me libeled. Otherwise, have at it. If you criticize me, make sure to praise my hair first.