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Friday, October 14, 2016

the forever gun book 6


THE FOREVER GUN BOOK 6
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RELOADS V RIMFIRE

Do you recall many times when the military reloads its ammunition?  Me either.  Yet, they use center fire primers.  Not rimfire.  Which are not as reliable.  It is pretty sweet that the military puts so much care and effort into given its troops great ammunition, then gives them a crappy gun to go with it ( I grant you that the original Colt M-16’s were built with abysmal quality control and all of them had severe rusting issues.  You could excuse them for lack of a better break in period.  I’ll grant you that the military keeps making the rifle worse by continually messing with powder types and barrel twists.  That is the Army doing its best to screw up a wet dream.  And I grant you that my issue weapon was an A1 model and so might be excused for jamming constantly.  I’m still not going to willingly bet my life on such a plastic turd ).  But in this case, we could actually learn something from the military ( I usually try to do the exact opposite as it improves my chances of survival ).  Center fire primers are simply better. 

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The problem with the rimfire, from a logistics point of view, was that they were TOO cheap.  From that basis alone every swinging cheese dingus wanna-be “survival expert” heartily recommended them.  You’ve all read the drivel.  You simply MUST have the following “budget” arsenal: semi carbine, semi battle rifle, semi pistols, bolt action sniper, shotgun and rimfire semi and pistol.  Sure, I’ll get right on that.  $3500 total for the cheapest of each type.  Not included are clips or ammunition.  I’d hate to think what they consider an expensive version.  Long ago I fixed my ammunition calibers at a total of three.  Battle bolt, revolver and rimfire.  If I didn’t have rimfire the third would be a pistol round that could fire from a insert in the battle rifle ( more of that to come ).  You know my feelings on semi’s.  But here is my point.  All those “experts” looked on the rimfire as nothing more than larger volumes of fire to be used by petite females and children.  To arm them, sure.  The most vulnerable need protection more than anyone.  But they are/were imprisoned in the semi paradigm.  They either believe all civilization collapses last approximately 365 days, and NO longer, or they think the supply of tree stump remover for alternate reloading supplies is both immense and infinite.  They never thought to conserve rimfire ammunition.

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In and of itself, the rimfire ( and, I suppose I should have reiterated this much sooner, rimfire is both an ignition system AND, as I use it, assumed to be the 22 Long Rifle only ) is really nothing more than a shooting gallery of old re-creation for entertainment purposes only.  It might be lethal but it was never more than a step up from a pellet gun towards the eventual Big Boy guns.  It was mistaken for a survival gun ONLY because the ammunition was so God Awful inexpensive that its only use was to bring forth an alternate source of lead filling the air.  It was a shotgun without the recoil.  Without it being so cheap it should NEVER had made the list of survival guns.  As a forever gun, yes of course.  As a tool to survive the die-off, however, it is nearly worthless.  Now that it is no longer affordable enough to piss away each weekend by the boxful, all of the other factors that make it an inferior round should be taken into consideration. 

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Not only is it’s ignition system less reliable, it can’t really be reloaded ( okay, it CAN be reloaded.  Technically.  You can fudge the process to some degree.  I would hesitate to bet my life on it, unless it is the only alternative with your budget ).  It’s stopping power is crap.  It’s wounding and killing potential is wonderful, given time.  If you plan on ambushing someone, the round is actually great.  Easily suppressed, you can Ninja their ass and escape easy detection.  Then you wait a few days or weeks for them to die of infection and internal injuries.  If you are out in the open, I would be a little less enthused over the caliber.

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Again, it sure beats arrows or muskets.  However, if you are able to afford options, I would suggest to you that almost any center fire pistol round is in itself superior to the rimfire.  Superior reloading ( with more reliable components ).  Superior stopping power ( we are speaking of relatives here.  Nothing stops like a close shotgun slug or a far away thirty caliber battle rifle bullet.  We are not comparing a pistol round to those, only to a rimfire ).  And, sadly, superior finances.  Yes, Virginia, more than likely it will be cheaper to reload a superior pistol round than to buy a factory loaded rimfire.  Sadly, because the era of rimfire is long gone and not coming back.  Ten cents a round for a rimfire, on sale ONLY, verses eight or nine cents every day low prices for reloads ( granted, I don’t factor in lead costs.  Lead is the ONLY reloading item that is low tech.  You can save and salvage and reuse lead all day long with a $40 tool and a fire.  Getting your lead included in the price of rimfire is less of a big deal than you imagine ).

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IF you already own a rimfire firearm, AND you already own a lot of ammo, AND you are too poor to pay attention, a rimfire Forever Gun is just fine and dandy.  If you have yet to own a Forever Gun, and can afford it, I would suggest you strongly consider a pistol center fire round instead of the rimfire.  It is simply a better choice all around.  The rimfire no longer holds the title of Frugal king.  Get updated on your survival/prep advice.

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25 comments:

  1. While the 22 is NOT ideal it is The most popular round as far as # of cartridges nation wide. The ability to find shells makes it a necessity to have a means to shoot them. Now if your starting from scratch then the 9mm as far as cost and Rank nationally of rounds sold. Reloading can be done for half of new .While cost of stocking a forever gun/round combination is a major factor it is also important to consider how popular the caliber is nationally for barter, purchase, scavenging.

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    1. That is a good point-thanks. I'll have to try to stuff that in somewhere.

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  2. H&R handi rifle 38sp / 357 mag

    you're welcome

    dr. shitfinger

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    1. Doc, I don't think we've heard from you in awhile. The 38/357 is for a further chapter.

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  3. Interestingly enough James, the rimfire had its share of popularity in the past. In my 1897 Sears, Roebuck & Co reproduction catalog, I counted no less than 16 rimfire cartridges available at the time. But apparently the rimfire cartridge did not contain the practicality of format, for it to make the leap into the modern age, as only a few were available by the latter half of the 20th century.

    I would imagine that the .22 LR is still quite a bit cheaper to shoot than most centerfires. But probably not enough so with its lack of reloadability to make it practical for purchase today. As you say, if you have one and plenty of rounds to go with it, keep it, and I'm sure it will serve you well.

    The .22 magnum, while a nice round, is way too overpriced, and always was. Same with the 22 HMR (.22 mag necked down to .17) .22 HM2 ( (.22 LR necked down to .17). Unless you already had plenty of ammo for the 3 above mentioned arms, I'd give them away to the closest friend or relative.

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    1. Give away to a close friend or relative you pissed you off. Be passive-aggressive.

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  4. And, when it comes to handling a 'anyone, including women and small children' being able to handle a round, I would recommend the still cheap-ish 9mm from practical experience a disabled woman and 8 year old boy are able to handle shooting a few rounds through a 9mm pistol.

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    1. And, I would imagine the 9mm carbine might be even better with the extra weight damping the recoil.

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  5. From my Marlin SS60 I used to put 10 out of 10 .22's in a coconut at 100yds. In less than 10 seconds from a sandbag. And there's still 7 left in the pipe. THAT will bring down just about any living thing in north america.

    Guess I was lucky with my Rack #104 army issue M16, in 37 months and thousands of shots in -30 to +100 temps I never had an issue. Not one.

    If I was starting over with very limited coin I'd probably do like Gary in Bama suggested. 9mm pistol and rifle, both with magazines and semi-automatic. Be a nice simple load out. Not the best but certainly not the worst.

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    1. I always play the "starting over" game with my arsenal. Of course, I've also done it for real a couple of times. Still, I can't get my mind off HK clones. But it is all fantasy-reality is proceeding ahead of my budget.

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  6. 9x19mm is common and dirt-cheap, fmj only a few cents more than (or cheaper than?!)mid-grade .22lr. Re-man is 19 cents in thousands, with occasional sales of new getting down there.
    124grain truncated cone semi-jacketed bullet in an Israeli +P+ loading (sturdy action only- dangerous in wimpy guns)fired from a carbine is accurate and effective (cartridge weight, cartridge volume, cost) against un-armored personnel inside the (short-ish) effective range. There are revolvers that can use 9x19mm (semi-auto-optimized) cartridges. UZI carbine, Kel-Tec sub-2000, DIY historical rifle/carbine to get the longer barrel needed to use the powder to make speed.
    Handi-rifle in .357Mag with glass and a spotter looks pretty good for cheap and reloadable, as would a .44Mag. A Handi-Rifle or a bolt-CZ in 7.62x39mm could also be in the nice-middle-ground. Tactics would be strictly limited to the patient ambush, never ever a fair fight, with multiple prepared exits. No one would need more than 20 rounds per encounter, but bring shade, lunch, and a canteen.

    My .22lr weapons each have thousands of rounds to make them valuable to me or the next user. I always include a box of ammo (325 or 500) with a .22 if I sell it, since the neckbeards have been staking out Wal-Mart ammo sections to divert ammo that should be stocked.

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    1. I was thinking about a .357 Handi-rifle as well. I already have a .357 revolver. Heavy loads for hunting... reversed wadcutters for revolver defense. I picked up a Lee-Loader kit for that caliber at a yard sale for $5 last summer. Still have to order bullet molds for that caliber.

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    2. Neckbeard is a pejorative term referring to unattractive, overweight and misogynistic Internet users who wear a style of facial hair in which a majority of the growth is present on the chin and neck. Neckbeards are commonly associated with hipster stereotypes and Internet addicts who frequent websites like 4chan and Reddit.

      http://knowyourmeme.com/memes/neckbeard

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    3. Okay, that's funny-I can picture one now.

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    4. AT- expect the bullet mold to be spendy-like $40 or so, new. Of course, well worth it given shipping costs and mandatory for better self-sufficiency. I keep putting off getting mine. I have the 303 of course, but a loyal minion just recently gifted me a 357 reloader and I need to get the mold. Course, I don't have pistol components so I keep putting it off.

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  7. I was told by a "professional" poacher (fed his family and every poor family within 5 miles) I was friends with.. that the best poaching (survival hunting) rifle was the .22 Mag. Twice the power of a .22LR with the same amount of sound.

    At todays prices... in my area.. $500 can get you a Marlin .22 Mag and 30 boxes of ammo. 1500 rounds is a lot of deer, woodchucks, pheasants, geese, and turkeys. Anything smaller I would use my pellet rifle.

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    1. I'm leery of relying on hunting due to suddenly increased population. But, yes, $500 is still a very cheap insurance policy.

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    2. Agree on the twice the power part, but fail to see how it wouldn't be any louder than a .22LR, as physics would seem to indicate otherwise (Then again, I'm no Stephen Hawking).

      All of those animals including deer, can easily be taken with a .22LR as well. Now the .22 mag would offer better range and killing power, but you would only need that for the deer, and you wouldn't want to be shooting at a deer with a .22 caliber bullet beyond short range anyhow. If I were a poacher, I would use a .22LR, and in particular, the subsonic .22's, which are said to be virtually silent in the longer barrel lengths. Or better yet, snares and traps.

      Just looked up the price of the .22 mag ammo, and the cheapest I saw was $10.79 a box. The .223 was actually cheaper, but of course it was for 20 rounds, not 50 as with the .22 mag. The difference being however that you can reload the .223. Not hating on the .22 mag, as my late father had one, and loved it. I just could never see the value in owning one? It's sort of a jack of all trades, master of none caliber, with most of the game that you can take with it, can also be taken with a .22LR for a fraction of the cost. For the price of the ammo, I'd rather have a small .22 cal centerfire that I can reload, but that's just me. For smaller game such as rabbits and squirrels, I'd go with a high powered .22 cal air rifle, if I weren't trapping or snaring.

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    3. Hunting when people "need" to hunt will be dangerous. Trapping will be less work and less dangerous. In urban areas, trapping will be the only fresh meat-food supplement, short of cannibalism. Cats/oppossum/raccoon/rat will go in your well-concealed baited trap. Stored food is the least dangerous way to have food.

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    4. I can't see relying on hunting at all. Trapping is the way to go, and wheat caching should be a given.

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    5. Yes hunting as a way to get food when your hungry and really needing it aint a good plan, but not being able to take a animal that happens to wonder by would really sux in a survival situation. There is a old saying, some what tong in check, the things you see when you haven't got a gun. PSHTF you don't want ever to not have a gun within easy reach at all times, not just for defence from 2 legged preditors but to opportunistically collect protein. And as for game, people don't factor in livestock. Livestock will be virtually worthless to farmers and many will be either abonded or turned loose.
      Aussie

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    6. I understand livestock can't be fed under current practices w/o transportation. Yet, the abandoned herds wouldn't last too many BBQ's, either.

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  8. I'm not big into the whole bug out idea, bugging out to no were in particular, is only likely to delay your impending demise by a week or 2. But were there is life there is hope, so bugging out should always be at least kept as a absolute last ditch back up plan. Quantity has a quality all of its own, if your on the move on foot you can carry a whole heap more 22lr than any centre fire. Google Malcom Nadin, he was a fella that lived out in the bush in Australia for 7 yrs by stealing from isolated houses and living of the land. He stole a lot of different guns, but carried a 22lrsemi auto.

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    1. I turned on The Road on Netflix, trying to sneak in a bit of doom on the NOL. Actually better than I remember it at first. Your comment reminds me of his .38 with a whole two rounds. A rimfire would have been much better.

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