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Friday, November 7, 2014

bulls-eye 2


BULLS-EYE 2

Okay, I’m glad I got that tirade off my chest.  Bulls-eye prepping is easy peasy pudding pie.  You supply yourself with the very bare minimum.  If the ass falls out of civilization ( a distinct possibility every single day now ), you are prepared.  If the can is kicked down the road, you keep upgrading to better and better quality.  This is the difference between the Glorious Bison Prepping Way and Everybody Else Who Is Unworthy Way Of Prepping.  Their way is to ever so slowly and surely work at prepping to that forty acres, a mule and freeze dried Yak testicles.  If anything really bad happens, their preps generally do not exceed a 72 hour food kit, a plastic tarp, a plastic compass and a $2,000 AR-15 with glowing red dot scope and ninety round drum magazine.  How many times has Rawles run an article on some five year prepping Yuppie who is barely beyond the researching and intense bible study phase ( again, not to pick on the man- he is but the latest in a long line of carbon copy survivalists gurus.  If nothing bad happens for the next twenty years, his advice is golden.  If something does, not so much )?  It seems that there is an article similar to this almost every week.  My heart ALMOST goes out to these people.  If I cared more I’d write inoffensive generic non-inflammatory, politically correct Jesus preaching meek pleas to get more readers, then rationally and calmly implore them to prep smarter and quicker.  But, hey, screw ‘em.

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They wouldn’t listen anyway.  For those that will, here is your target.  My Infamous $500 Frugal Survivalist Plan.  Wheat and a bolt action rifle, a grinder and filter and some ammo.  You really can’t do this on $500 anymore unless your long gun is a single shot 12 gauge.   But with about $800 you can buy a new modern bolt action, a spam can or two of commie carbine ammo ( the steel case thirty cent a round in 762x39 or 223 ), a good Corona grinder and Katadyn water filter element and a year’s supply of wheat in buckets.  One assumes you have plenty of warm clothing and a pick and shovel to build an improvised dug out ( have a good piece of plastic or two ) and some warm blankets ( you don’t have the clothing to put you on a bicycle in the winter?  What happens if the Saudi main refinery is taken out by ISIS?  You don’t have wool blankets and a feather comforter for sleeping without central heat?  What happens when the can can’t be kicked down the road anymore by the central bank and we are seeing 50% unemployment? ).  This is your primary target to shoot for.  Even a poor slob on retirement or minimum wage and scrape up, even with some difficulty, $500-$800.  Anyone can be prepped, now.  Next article, we expand outside the bulls-eye and further our preps to a more luxurious and improved level.

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9 comments:

  1. Bullseye 2 11-07-14
    " One assumes you have plenty of warm clothing and a pick and shovel to build an improvised dug out ( have a good piece of plastic or two ) and some warm blankets ( you don’t have the clothing to put you on a bicycle in the winter?  What happens if the Saudi main refinery is taken out by ISIS?  You don’t have wool blankets and a feather comforter for sleeping without central heat?"

    Thrift stores are the best bargains in town James. It's probably the same at all, but in my area, pants, shirts, and coats, are all the same price regardless of the original retail price. For me, the biggest challenge would be socks, since they wear out the most, and wouldn't typically be found at a thrift store. Also, the wool pants at a thrift store probably aren't as good of a bargain as I had originally thought? I say this based on the fact that the type typically found at a thrift store are of the dress variety. That is, they are quite thin, and require dry cleaning. But if you can find a way around the dry cleaning, I would say go for it. I got two pairs of wool dress slacks that were in new condition, and probably retailed for no less than $100.00, for $7.00 each! Otherwise, military surplus wool pants are a better bargain, being much thicker, and washable.

    As a substitute for blankets, also consider a Cold weather sleeping bag. In this day and age of modern synthetics, it's quite possible to get a bag rated for very cold weather for well under a $100.00. No, it won't be light, and can only double for car camping, as opposed to backpacking. But it will be warm, and washable, as opposed to down. There are lightweight synthetic sleeping bags that are rated for cold weather, but they are much smaller, and more expensive. The sportsman's guide has some nice bags at a good price. Down bags are nice and light, but harder to clean, and useless if they become wet. This probably isn't much of a concern if being used in a shelter, but you are still faced with the cleaning issue. I would suggest that if you already happen to have a down bag, and do not wish to part with the funds for a new synthetic bag, that you should purchase an inexpensive synthetic liner, that can be easier cleaned.

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    1. On wool slacks. Just have a few jugs of Wool-lite ( dishwash soap works in a pinch ). Since the slacks are so thin ( an improvement over jeans or slacks, but yeh, Sportmans Guide military surplus thick wool pants are the bomb-diggity. Mine go on at single digits and my legs are warm at -20 ) they will dry real quick so self-cleaning ( as opposed to dry cleaners ) is no big deal. Hand wash in a pail, rinse, lay out flat- no hanging or they stretch out in a new shape- on a towel and done in a day or so.

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  2. That thought on cleaning dry clean only items, had occurred to me before James. If you can clean them with a solution, and lay them out flat to dry, so that they don't deform, they should be alright. The only other method that I can think of requires using a dryer, which requires grid power, so that's out. At $7.00 a pair, you're not going to get a better deal on wool pants than that.

    I've noticed that wool shirts are damn expensive these days, usually in the $80.00 to $100.00 price range. But military wool sweaters, or really, even wool sweaters in general, are much lower in price. I saw a Pendleton wool shirt the last time I was at the thrift store, but unfortunately it was not in my size. That's a $100.00 shirt for $5.00, so it pays to pay attention when at the thrift stores.

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    Replies
    1. Didn't mean to imply you were dumber than a box of Obammy :). I do a lot of "state the obvious" not for the person I'm responding to but for all other readers who are unfamiliar with a concept. Good info on the sweater vs. shirts. I hadn't paid attention so its good to know.

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    2. No problem James; no offense taken at all. In fact, I wasn't actually sure that this would work until you confirmed it; thanks.

      Wayne

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  3. j, how much wheat do you consider a years supply?

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    1. 400 pounds. One pound a day, 1500 calories. 365 days, the extra is for sprouts. Elko feed is expensive- $15 a 50 lb sack. Yours might be cheaper. Feed store wheat and Home Depot buckets, $44 a hundred pounds. As we discussed, you can buy Wal-Mart wheat through the web site and deliver to your local store, only about $7 extra a hundred pounds compared to do-it-yourself. Worth it to avoid the potential toxic buckets.

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    2. And as a reminder riverrider, if you are getting it from a feed store, make sure that you don't get the stuff that's treated with wormer for livestock. I think it has a red tint to it? But it will say so on the bag.

      Wayne

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