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Wednesday, February 8, 2017

flee in 30 days part 3


FLEE IN 30 DAYS part 3

You have a month to move.  Yes, it is arbitrary.  But any longer and most of you will have your attention span challenged.  It is pulling off a band-aid, not planning for the loyal wedding of the century.  Plus, I’m kind of trying to explain the obvious here.  How friggin easy it is to get out of a very unsafe area.  Worried about not finding another job?  Hell, how secure is the one you have now?  It isn’t any harder finding one there than here ( within reason ).  I know my boss will drop me at the first sign they can find another sucker to fill in for me ( of course, good luck with that.  This is the first time I’ve ever felt I have good job security.  Who else is going to work this hard for this little of pay?  I think we’ll go out of business first ).  So, as soon as you decide what you are going to do ( move to an apartment with junk land nearby, move out to the land with a trailer, whatever ), you spend all your free time looking for that junk land.  Send a mail order overnight or pay on a debit card for a down payment ( almost all junk land sellers finance you, and you don’t need a credit check.  Just cash, and on time payments ) and put in your two week notice at work. 

*

Now you liquidate everything you possibly can.  I kept my sensible revolver and sold my two boy toy .45’s ( private sale at retail cost with mags and ammo thrown in and they sold the first half day of a one day ad ) and that paid for gas across the country, motel stays ( way too humid to sleep in the van as originally hoped ) and meals ( supermarket cold foods the first two and a sit down hot one at the end of the day-I don’t do well at all driving in the dark so we only did twelve hour days ).  I had credit cards at the time which bought the van at the beginning of the trip and the travel trailer at the end of it.  Not the smartest financing but it got us out of crowded Florida to a great western locale.  With no savings and one low paying job between the two of us.  We walked away from our mobile home which we had paid 25% down on just a year or two before.  When you want to move, these things take on far less importance.  No jobs were waiting for me.  Granted, this was just after 9/11 and jobs were easy to find ( our initial destination-warmth for the spouse-was Kingman Arizona.  No job prospects there all week long so we moved up to Nevada.  That worked out much better.  Kingman was full of Yuppie Scum and has no surface water.  My pale northern European skin also burned within hours.  Land was darn cheap, even in town, but with no jobs…). 

*

It’s scary out there, employment wise.  Worse case, if I can’t find another job here I can always get on Food Stamps and crash at my B-POD rather than pay rent in town.  But it is still worrisome, and I am in a much better position than most of you as far as employment.  I wouldn’t want to make another move across the country at this point in our economy.  But I am of course far more paranoid than most of you and panicked early.  So you are in the position of staying in a scary crime ridden turd of a huge city which in the event of a collapse will become unlivable even if you have a wicked cool semi-auto concealed carry gun and an armored SUV.  And you are anchored there by your job.  A job which won’t be there much longer given the direction of our economy.  Think on this.  In 2008, within a half a week the economy almost went tits up.  You had little warning.  What?  You think it will be different next time?  It won’t.  Zero warning, immediate catastrophe.  Just think back to how bad things were then for the next couple of years with the lay-offs and the local governments running out of money and the high unemployment.  And that was with the bail-outs.  You MUST panic early.

*

I read an interesting statistic the other day that the majority of Americans never live more than fifty miles from the same spot all their lives.  I have a hard time counting all the times I’ve moved in my life ( 30-40+ ) and for me it is no big deal.  Or, it was no big deal.  Now I’m rooted and refuse to even vacation far from here.  The big deal for most of us is being able to give up everything normally construed as an investment, plus worrying about employment at our destination.  Yet, most of you are at a higher skill set than I am in employment.  Why haven’t you moved?  Surely your odds of finding a job surpass mine?  And it isn’t the problems you shall face moving now, it is the far more serious ones later if you refuse to move now.  Right now, moving moves you around in the frying pan.  Trying to move later, you are forced to jump from the pan into the fire.  It is really as simple as that.  Look, all those people who were convinced the end was nigh, back in the ‘70’s or ‘90’s?  You can’t claim they screwed up, because they are the ones who got in early and got to move to a great location which was expensive then but cheap compared to today’s prices, plus they found steady employment and learned homesteading while there was still time.

*

NOT moving NOW is the wrong course of action, not moving way too early.  Once you resolve yourself, it is as simple as liquidation and packing.  The move itself is easy ( of course, given Murphy’s Law which ALWAYS manifests itself during a move-trust me, I’ve had plenty of experience-you need to double the anticipated money, time and trouble and plan accordingly ).  Even if nothing goes right, it is a great learning experience.  I know, easy for me to say as I won’t be giving up my house or job or marriage.  Hey, I’ve been there and bought the T-shirt.  I know the disruption and loss.  I also know I finally got it right and found a location that will suit me come retirement or collapse.  In the end, after a high price, it is worth it.  If you don’t actually think we will collapse any time soon, just find a nice $50 a month junk land payment and a affordable used travel trailer and plan on retiring there.  Worse case, you can move there during the collapse, without any disruption before that.  Have everything in place.  The land, trailer in the back yard, savings.  And move in two weeks once the next economic collapse begins-and again, without any disruption now.  Come on!  You can’t handle $50 a month now?  I’ll bet you a jelly filled donut that right now there are junk land lots in Arizona and Elko that are $50 a month, and that is without having looked on E-Bay for the last few weeks.  Again, this stuff is easy.  The resolve is the issue.

END

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17 comments:

  1. Exactly so. I found a job in a very rural, cold area (I can mostly handle the cold), and chose to take the job when I found a state land sale with affordable prices for large (40 acre an up) lots of land with no HOAs or local or state building codes. Surface water in walking distance (when it isn't frozen) and lots of local food production (wheat, beans, and beef -isn't that the prepper's dream diet). The sacrifice has been significant, no close friends in driving distance, ruined credit from the abandoned condo that the bank refuses to foreclose on or do a 'deed in lieu' for, less income, harsher weather(-25F this morning), and nosy neighbors.
    But it is worth it. I am building the house I can live the rest of my life in, the spouse will have the dream garden, the child and canines have room to run, we can practice our shooting when ever we like, and basically live mostly free, while being as prepared as possible for whatever life brings to our country and civilization.

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    1. We had one day here Dec./Jan worse than minus ten, and just a few a whisker under zero. The winters here are getting shorter and milder. Downside, the rains/warming come suddenly and melt a good portion of the snow. 30-40 here the last week, everything flooding ( one park and bus lot for the miners had over a foot of water standing. We got melting then rain so we are saturated ). I think I picked a good Bad Winter location, aside from its other issues.

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  2. When I moved off-grid to Northern Idaho twenty years ago, hubby almost didn't join me. He worked at a barely-above-minimum-wage job but he had lots of loyalty for the small, local manufacturing company.

    Less than a year after we moved (hubby did end up joining me), the company was sold and all the jobs were moved to Chicago.

    A friend once told me something that really put the employer/employee relationship in perspective:

    "If you quit, an employer expects a two week notice. If you are fired, you are shown the door that minute."

    i.e. -- You're suppose to show loyalty to your job but it is not reciprocated.

    Idaho Homesteader

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    1. And even with two weeks notice, they still might bad mouth you on the phone reference ( even if legal, damning with praise, hinting, etc ). Here's another one: In know you've been a harder worker than anyone else, accepted lower pay, never call in sick, cover shifts on no notice, but, well, what have you done for me lately?

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    2. Don't get me started on Employers screwing loyal and hard working employees. You see it happen enough times that you wake up to yourself and realise that it's the norm. I think it has a lot to do with the type of people attracted to HR or supervisor / management. You know, fair dinkum socio / psychopaths. If you check out the book "the sociopath next door" maybe it's "the psychopath" - but from memory it's not an insignificant percentage of people are sociopaths. They're a nightmare to deal with.

      Now I'm angry thinking about the last time I got screwed over by an employer

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    3. My first six months at this job, they sacked a co-worker more from being a scapegoat than performance issues. It could have been a personality conflict. But it was weeks before Christmas. Why am I still here? It never got better. I guess I too accept it as the norm.

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    4. dingo, read that ceo's have a higher percentage of sociopaths than the general population.

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  3. Very true that you will not be notified when SHTF, you'll have to figure it out on your own. Reminds me of a conversation I overheard at work after the 2008 market crash.
    Co-worker 1: I'm so sad my house is in foreclosure, my loan reset at a higher rate, I'm depressed, wah, wah, wah.
    Co-worker 2: Don't feel bad, you'll be okay, you're not the only one, "NOBODY SAW THIS COMING."

    I narrowly avoided laughing out loud. This was a guy that I previously thought was of at least average intelligence. Housing prices had inflated so much they weren't even affordable to what you call the upper 10%. I would forgive a person for not being able to time the 2008 crash, but they should have seen it coming. # 2 later lost his house as well. I didn't say anything so they wouldn't hate me for it.

    The only way you'll be "told" SHTF is if it's something obvious like an EMP. Along the same lines, notice how you only see on the news that a meteor narrowly missed Earth AFTER it passes? I'm not really concerned about meteor strikes, it's just an example.
    Peace out

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    1. I think the movies on asteroids hitting from a few years back went a long way delegitimizing the concern. The one in Russia six or so years ago didn't help-"it just cracked some windows". To me, that said "we'll never even know". Oh, well, I guess we can just wait for the 400 next Fukishima's.

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    2. That reminds me.

      A number of years ago there was a significant flood in my state. Along with the panic buying the local water board asked via radio that people were careful with their water usage in case the water treatment facility was overwhelmed.

      Well, they experienced RECORD water usage as people filled every container they could including bathtubs etc.

      My take away is this.That will have been the last time the water board will ever issue that type of warning again

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    3. It amazes me to think ANYONE believes any ruler cares enough about them to warn them of anything.

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  4. You might have a clue as to something being up if you watch what those in the know are doing. Unfortunately when it comes to timing even those in the know are often blindsided. But recently there was an article making the rounds talking about how many of the rich are getting bunkers and remote secured homesteads and stocking up for 'bad times'. We are talking about the young nouveau-riche who are seen as optimistic and up and coming big men who are going to be taking over- getting ready to head for the hills so to speak.
    Something is in the wind. And it isn't good.

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    1. How these guys are acting, and how those in power act are two different things. I can't reconcile the two behaviors, myself. Which just leaves me more confused than normal.

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    2. most of those already in power already have backup plans and preps in place, in some cases for generations. They are just very quiet about it - hardly anyone thinks twice about the Bush family Crawford Tx off grid ranch, and it barely got a mention that they have another similar place somewhere in South America. That is the sort of thing all the old school rich have in place, only even quieter.
      The Nouveau-Riche on the other hand are innately loud in most cases, and have just found out they have a lot of missed ground to make up for.

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    3. I believe the Bush South American getaway was in Paraguae. Paraguy. Whatever-look it up for the right spelling. Right next to a military base that gets US funding and/or staffing.

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  5. a few years ago my nephew and his step brother saw an anomaly in their pay packets one friday and ,when they asked, were told they were fired and don't come back on monday.
    his step brother has little kids and it was just before Christmas. he had already spent his money on kids' gifts.
    i know my nephew is smart, clean, honest and hard working.
    his step brother was saved because he rented his house from his in laws. they were able to carry the payments until he found another job.
    my nephew already had a second job on weekends, so he was able to make it with help from his dad.
    but that put my brother very close to the bone financially.
    they got through it but many have not.

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    1. I'm surprised they could get away with such blatant behavior ( the usual way is to hide why you are being fired ). One company town?

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