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Thursday, February 2, 2017

flee in 30 days part 2


FLEE IN 30 DAYS part 2

When you are trying to leave the Rat Race, buying land has some unique problems.  It has to be cheap, close to town to compensate for lack of a motor vehicle and with low property tax.  When that land also serves as a crash pad for the economic crash, you must add in distance from people and access to nearby surface water ( I don’t place fertile farm land on the list.  You store the one thing difficult to farm on a small plot-grain-and you can raise veggies and eggs on the worst land.  Wheat costs $100 for a years worth of calories and does away with the requirement for rare soil and excess water.  You spend more than that in a month on cable and cell phones.  But everyone is holding out for twenty acres and a mule, hence never leaving their city.  Methinks they aren’t too serious about surviving ).  With the 30 Day Plan, you can try to factor in all these requirements, and you should, but they are not critical.  You can make marginal payments on the land if you keep in the rat race.  As well as have the motor vehicles for commuting.  And have a larger property tax.  You have a broader amount of land to pick from.

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So, you aren’t trying to finance $150k for a boonies survival retreat, nor are you stuck on a $3k piece of desert in a state you don’t care for.  I’d say a good rule of thumb is to buy land equal to the average automobile price, if two of you are working and you aren’t excessively in debt ( otherwise, you might have no choice but to go low end ).  Again, this is far from perfect.  But you went from a mortgage of $150k to that of $15k.  Or, you went from renting to buying.  As long as the buying cost is lower than the renting, of course.  Nor do you even need to buy land.  If you move from a $600 a month apartment to a $300 a month trailer space rental, you are still ahead of the game.  That way, you can move anywhere you desire.  And since a lot of RV parks are out in the boonies, there is a bit of a bonus.  It simply increases your options-it is not a perfect or preferred method.  And granted, it probably doesn’t make sense if you need to make payments on the trailer.  Better to tent camp and build as cash comes in.  But if you already have an RV, or can get one cheap, it is another way you can go.  It certainly doesn’t leave you any excuses why you haven’t moved.  All you need is a hitch and some fuel ( just beware a lot of RV parks are being greedy whores and only want Social Security pukes parking there.  They put a maximum age on the trailer to ensure poor workers don’t have this rental option ).

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This is just one of the myriad of ways that the poor are confined to their reservations.  Try not to fight that trend.  You could work a solid honorable job, rescue kittens or volunteer as a firefighter in your spare time, but if you are poor some fat worthless lawyer or a Yuppie Bitch spreading her legs for the lions share of the husbands paycheck will look down on you like you are a dog turd smeared on their shoe.  Stay away from the better off so as not to become one of their targets.  They know people who know people in City Hall.  In other words, keep to your own tribe.  Which usually also means, beware the advice most survival guru’s give.  It is geared towards the Yuppie Scum.  If you are not worthy because you can’t afford their advice, they don’t need your patronage.  You probably have more to spend on them, seeing as how you aren’t in debt for a retreat and retreat bug out vehicles, but that is not how they look at it.  Anyway, back on subject.  Moving is the hardest aspect of vastly improving your percentage of disposable income, and the advantage of improving your location.  And you’ve done it enough so that it isn’t too strenuous or mysterious.  Move, already.

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You don’t have to live in a well funded property tax suburb to have your kids in a better school.  Move to a state that allows home schooling, or baring that you know perfectly well that a small town is probably much safer than a big city school regardless of money spent per pupil.  So you can’t use the kids as an excuse.  And don’t listen to them whine about leaving old friends.  Kids are some of the most fickle unloyal little conehead bastards around.  They’ll make new friends.  They just are trying to avoid undesirable change.  We all hate change-it is in our DNA from the time it might have meant danger.  We are still in a high enough energy economy ( most of the issue is that we aren’t in anywhere near as HIGH FLOW of an energy economy as it was designed for.  But we still have enough surplus to make stupid decisions based on change and have a sufficient cushion to rescue ourselves ).

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Family nearby?  A false sense of security, as nobody has the means to help those in need, not even family.  And a false sense of happiness as most families has everybody working and they are all on different schedules and nobody sees anybody anymore.  With nearly free mail, e-mail, cheap long distance, Facebook messages and Skype connections, why do you need to live in the same area?  Again, excuses.  Almost finished with retirement and must stay put?  Why aren’t you paying for land now, so retirement lacks that expense?  If you are living in a house that is, or almost is, paid for, yet you don’t feel safe living there any longer than you have to, why pretend you are forced to stay there because of the money you’ve already paid?  Do you stress about the money you’ve paid all these years on cell phones?  For food?  For cars?  You don’t desperately hold on to cars that are paid for, do you?  Of course not.  You get rid of the piece of crap and get another.  You don’t look at them as investments, but consumables.  Well, sorry, but houses are the same way.  With the property tax you pay, and the commuting you do, and the deteriorating surrounding areas ( blight, pollution, crime ), how can you call that an investment?  It was always just an ill-considered expense.  Better late than never to make better choices.  Move, already.  Continued tomorrow.

END

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7 comments:

  1. Good article. Jim $ 15,000 in Alabama normally would buy 3 acres 25 miles from a major city. At that price it would have water and power available , if no utilities are available it would be enough for 5+ acres. These are rural retail not junk or tax prices. Old overgrown 1 acre with no utility's are common 3 to 5000. No utility's is a good thing as it makes a person learn solar and water conservation.

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    1. The price difference between utilities and not is a LOT of solar panels.

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  2. Replies
    1. Thanks, I was worried it was too repetitive.

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  3. Hey Bison... Today you touched again on a subject that is near and dear to my heart - growing food on junk land. I want to reinforce your statement that you can "grow veggies and chickens on the worst land." Too many feel they need 3 ft of topsoil and an endless source of manure to grow food. Also they think a lot of water is needed. Neither is true. In fact, having the above generally results in growing very inefficiently, which means more work than necessary. Count me out.

    I grow vegetables using passive hydroponic methods. Soil quality is not an issue, and only minimal amounts of water are needed. It is often stated that at least 1/4 acre of land is needed to grow food for one person. Wrong again. Something less than 800 sqft is adequate with intensive cultivation if you are industrious. I'm not and use only 200 sqft, but experience tells me that 800 sqft would be more than enough if I needed to grow to survive. The one thing that is critical for growing and that should be a major criteria for selecting land is sunlight. Pick a spot that has good southern exposure in an area with decent weather. I live on a remote section of the Washington coast and it is nearly always cold and overcast. However, 10 miles inland the sun is usually bright and skies are relatively clear. In spite of my poor weather choice, I'm able to grow vegetables with relative ease.

    You have made sound arguments for stockpiling wheat while it is still available at low cost thanks to cheap oil. I have a similar approach to farming. Stockpile concentrated chemical nutrients while they are still available at low cost, again, thanks to cheap oil. Being simple mineral compounds, dry hydroponic nutrients store forever. You will need about 40 lb of chemicals to grow a man-year of food. In bulk these sell for about 50 cents/lb. A 400 lb 10 year supply will cost about $200 and can be stored in two plastic 30 gallon drums.

    One further note on nutrients - there are enough high grade nutrients in one's own urine to grow nearly enough food for oneself. Using it to supplement a 10 year nutrient supply could extend the chemical stockpile for decades.

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    Replies
    1. This is an approach I hadn't thought of and makes excellent sense! Thank you.

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